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Musicals on Tap


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Princess is correct.  It's "The Goldwyn Follies", which was released in February of 1938.  George died from a brain tumor in July of 1937.  The songs "Our Love Is Here To Stay" and "Love Walked Right In" were both sung by Kenny Baker and both became standards.  George actually wrote two other songs that are heard in the movie, "I Was Doing  Alright", which is heard on the radio, sung by Ella Logan, and "I Love To Rhyme".  That song is sung and played by Phil Reagan and Edgar Bergen.    Here is Kenny Baker in a scene with Andrea Leeds and Ella Logan:

 

 

 

Kenny was a singer on Jack Benny's radio show.  He left to make movies and recordings.  It was a bad career move.  His movie career was rather short.  Jack replaced him with a singer of similar range named Dennis Day.  Dennis was with Jack on radio and TV for many years.  Ella Logan, in the gray dress, was from Scotland.  Some years after this movie, she would star on Broadway in "Finian's Rainbow".  I couldn't find a clip of her song, but here is a recording of "I Was Doing Alright" by another Ella, Ella Fitzgerald:

 

 

 

Marsha, thanks for your guess.  "Shall We Dance" was released about two months before George's death.  Princess, you get to ask the next question.  

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Sticking with the Goldwyn Follies, you're reminded that its choreographer, George Balanchine was one of the European emigres who brought authentic classical ballet to the United States between the two world wars.

 

What made Balanchine truly different was that he had a real love and appreciation for American culture-- he loved the dancing of Astaire & Rogers, as well as all jazz dancing.

 

Before Hollywood, his choreography on Broadway was revolutionary; he choreographed the elements of classical ballet, in a jazz style,to popular jazz music.

 

Balanchine's Broadway show became a Hollywood movie. Moreover, his jazz-ballet was also recreated in another Hollywood musical, danced by a great movie tap dancer.

 

What we're looking for here is: the name of the Broadway show (same name as the Hollywood movie adaptation), the name of the jazz-ballet and its composer, the tap dancers who danced the jazz-ballet on Broadway and in the movies and, of course, the identities of the ballerinas who danced in the three presentations.

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Princess, you're asking for a lot here.  The 1936 Broadway show was called "On Your Toes" with music by Richard Rodgers.  It was made into a movie in 1939.  The jazz-ballet is "Slaughter On Tenth Avenue".  On Broadway, it featured Ray Bolger and Tamara Geva (Balanchine's former wife).  The movie featured Eddie Albert and Vera Zorina (Balanchine's wife at the time).  It was danced in the 1948 Rodgers and Hart biopic "Words And Music" by Gene Kelly and Vera-Ellen.  And by the way, the 1939 movie "On Your Toes" featured another tap dancer.  Donald O'Connor played Eddie Albert as a boy.

 

Check out this clip:

 

 

And this clip as well:

 

 

 

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Miles, I asked for a lot because I know you always enjoy a challenge. But this didn't look too hard for you. A lot would have been asking you to name all of Balanchine's wives! FYI-- they were four of them and they were all ballet dancers.LOL

 

Anyway Miles, thank you for the dance videos. I always thought that Slaughter was the best jazz dance Gene Kelly ever did in the movies.

 

Miles, you earned the next turn - -

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Ah, Princess, the research for the question was very enlightening.  I love learning new things about musicals.  Who knew that Eddie Albert could dance?  

Now, we know that Fred and Ginger danced in a gazebo during a rain storm in "Top Hat".  A few years later, two top dancers did the same thing, as well as dancing out in the rain in a movie musical.  Can you name them, the movie, and the song that they sloshed around to?

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Sorry, Miles, that's not the answer.  While it's true that they wore sailor uniforms in both movies, I'm thinking specifically of a similar musical number in both movies where these two co-stars (not Sinatra and Kelly) wore the exact same costume.  Both movies were a little bit earlier than Anchors Aweigh.

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That's it, Marsha!  In both Babes in Arms and Babes on Broadway, the minstrel segment began with Mickey and Judy dressed as Mr. Bones and Mr. Tambo and they wore the very same costumes in both movies.  I tried to find a clip from each film to show this, but all of the minstrel clips were of other parts of the show when they had changed out of the Bones and Tambo costumes; so you'll just have to take my word for it. 

 

Anyway, good work, Marsha; the thread is yours.

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Thanks, Star, Love every musical starring Mickey and Judy. One of the greatest pairing in movie musical history second only to Fred and Ginger.

 

This musical performer was under contract to 20th Century Fox where she made several films in which she co-starred with the one and only Carmen Miranda.  One of these films is about a burlesque star who at the suggestion of her manager writes her autobiography to show her literary knowledge. It is reported that Fox paid a huge sum to a very famous burlesque/strip tease artist for the rights to her book in order to film the movie. After her Fox years, this actress made her Broadway debut in one of Broadway's greatest musicals in which she created one of the most iconic characters in musical theater history.

 

1. Name this actress musical performer  2. Name the Fox film in which she plays a burlesque star. 3. Name the famous burlesque/strip tease artist. 4. Name the Broadway musical and iconic character created by this wonderful performer/actress.

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Thanks, Star, Love every musical starring Mickey and Judy. One of the greatest pairing in movie musical history second only to Fred and Ginger.

 

This musical performer was under contract to 20th Century Fox where she made several films in which she co-starred with the one and only Carmen Miranda.  One of these films is about a burlesque star who at the suggestion of her manager writes her autobiography to show her literary knowledge. It is reported that Fox paid a huge sum to a very famous burlesque/strip tease artist for the rights to her book in order to film the movie. After her Fox years, this actress made her Broadway debut in one of Broadway's greatest musicals in which she created one of the most iconic characters in musical theater history.

 

1. Name this actress musical performer  2. Name the Fox film in which she plays a burlesque star. 3. Name the famous burlesque/strip tease artist. 4. Name the Broadway musical and iconic character created by this wonderful performer/actress.

1. Vivian Blaine

2. DOLL FACE

3. Gypsy Rose Lee

4. Guys and Dolls, she played Adelaide, Adelaide, ever lovin' Adelaide

????

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1. Vivian Blaine

2. DOLL FACE

3. Gypsy Rose Lee

4. Guys and Dolls, she played Adelaide, Adelaide, ever lovin' Adelaide

????

"From a lack of community property

And a feeling she's getting too old.

A person can develop a bad, bad cold. (Kerchoo!)"

Thank you Miss Adelaide.....and thank you Vivian Blaine and of course Frank Loesser

 

and thank you Lavender for your correct answer.  The thread is yours.

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I never thought I'd say that a musical had too much dancing, but if there is one this might be it. But of course, all the dancing is very good.

 

Give a girl a break - - Helen wood, Marge champion and of course the winner is Debbie Reynolds. And they danced with Gower champion and Bob Fosse.

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Give A Girl A Break, Helen Wood, Marge Champion, Debbie Reynolds, Gower Champion and Bob Fosse, all correct Princess :) TCM once in a very blue moon shows this film and you're also right about ALL that dancing! LOL but a great cast, not such a great film, but an OK one. However, fascinating to see Marge and Gower together and always love seeing Fosse. Good work, your thread Princess

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Star, I didn't know anybody had seen it. I saw it in a film class in college.

 

Since it's such an early musical it's has none of the sweetness or cutsy woosie stuff that you see in most musicals of the Golden Era.

 

You almost have to wait for West Side Story to see another musical as

murky and nitty gritty.

 

Star, you really know your stuff. It's a pleasure doing business with you.LOL

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Thanks, Princess!  I would have responded sooner, but I've been having some trouble accessing this website.  I'm not sure what the problem is.  Anyway -

 

Yes, I saw and taped Applause off of public television back in the late 80's I believe.  Unfortunately, I erased it to tape something else and, of course, it's one of those movies that never shows up anywhere any more.  But it did make a lasting impression.  I would love to have it back in my collection.  Moving on:

 

This mid-30's musical was remade twice, first in the early 40's and then again in the early 50's.  It had a male star and two leading ladies.  Can you name the 3 versions of this musical and the 3 stars in each case?

 

 

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Applause (1929 w/Helen Morgan) is on YouTube, in case you're still looking.

 

I thought I had your answer with Girl Crazy..until I realized the last one with Connie Francis was mid 60's...back to the drawing board...

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