Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Musicals on Tap


Recommended Posts

Thanks, Princess.

 

Although it was not a musical, the star of this movie, who had tap danced in a number of earlier films, felt that a little tap routine should be worked into the proceedings and found the perfect spot for it.  Can you name the star and the movie?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Star.  I love that scene in Roxie Hart.  I'm glad that Ginger Rogers got to put that number in the movie. 

 

 

 

Next:  In this well-known 1940s musical film, an actress-dancer performed a song-and-dance number that would later be called her "quintessential dance number".   Please name the film, the actress-dancer, and the song that she sang and danced to.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Star.  I love that scene in Roxie Hart.  I'm glad that Ginger Rogers got to put that number in the movie. 

 

 

 

Next:  In this well-known 1940s musical film, an actress-dancer performed a song-and-dance number that would later be called her "quintessential dance number".   Please name the film, the actress-dancer, and the song that she sang and danced to.

Ann Miller- Easter Parade- The routine maybe was Shakin the Blues Away. ??? I remember Ann talking about how her husband had pushed her down a flight of stairs while pregnant. Shakin the Blues Away is one of my favs of all film dance routines, so I'll go with that one

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann Miller- Easter Parade- The routine maybe was Shakin the Blues Away. ??? I remember Ann talking about how her husband had pushed her down a flight of stairs while pregnant. Shakin the Blues Away is one of my favs of all film dance routines, so I'll go with that one

 

You are correct, Lavender!  I was horrified when I found out what happened to her.  You would never guess that there was anything wrong because she performs the number so energetically and flawlessly.  Amazing!  This is one of my favorite dance numbers, too.

 

Your turn, Lavender. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My question concerns two songs in two musicals...in the first film, the leading man and lady team up to sing the memorable tune...in the later film, the same actor stars, but doesn't sing song number two. Why are these two linked? Because song two (in a very big film) is clearly the same as song one..except the lyrics were changed. Both were same studio, same producer (maybe why there was no lawsuit)..same tune, same 'spirit'.

 

If you know the original tune, and the one that film two's director called plagiarism, you'll know the two musical movies.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy and Gene sang Cole Porter's be a clown in the pirate.

 

Donald O'Connor sang make them laugh in Singing in the Rain, starring Gene Kelly. Song by Arthur freed and nacio Brown.

 

Arthur freed was the producer of both movies at MGM.

 

Same song Different lyrics - - since Cole Porter also worked for arthur, he was nice enough to ignore it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Female dancer in major Studio was scheduled to co-star in a major Musical. The married dancer discovers she's pregnant and considers an abortion.

 

She doesn't have the abortion, so the Studio has to find a replacement.

 

The replacement is a debut artist who subsequently becomes a big star.

 

Please identify the two dancers, the major Studio and the major Musical that we mentioned in the question.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn`t know about the abortion angle, and the dancer you mention wasn`t exactly a tap dancer so much as a ballet dancer,  but from the clue you have given and having seen some of conversation clips on TCM,  this is my guess:

 

 

The married dancer is Cyd Charisse.

 

She was supposed to be Gene Kelly`s leading lady in An American in Paris.

 

The role ended up going to Leslie Caron who was discovered by Gene Kelly.

 

 

The studio was MGM.

 

 

This is just a guess, because I don`t remember Cyd ever considering having an abortion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

GPF-- correct on all points.

 

Cyd was a trained ballet dancer - and Gene Kelly had been training her to be a jazz dancer. MGM had been grooming her to be a star with a contract for a number of years.

 

Cyd was married to the MGM contract singer Tony Martin.

 

The studio had invested a lot of money in Cyd, and they were very disappointed when she couldn't take this role.

 

She discussed all this in a People magazine article, following the success of the That's Entertainment movies.

 

An American in Paris role for the girl doesn't require tap dancing. The whole point of the movie in the ballet was-- the American tap danced from the American jazz cultural perspective and the French girl danced classical- ballet from French culture.

 

GPF-- you can Shuffle off to Buffalo--your turn, well-done!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised I got one right in this category.

 

I'll try to come up with one that is interesting:

 

 

Here it goes:

 

 

This actor was a song and a dance man on musicals who could do a variety of dancing styles.  He isn't one of the first people you think of when you think male dancers, and yet, he danced all the time.  He was supposed to do a movie with Judy Garland but could not due to a medical issue.  He would later be famous for a Television show.

 

Name the actor/dancer, the movie he was supposed to make with Judy and the TV series he starred in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be Buddy Ebsen who was to play the part of the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz.  He is probably best remembered as Jed Clampett on The Beverly HIllbillies, although he also had another successful series playing the title character of Barnaby Jones.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right Starliteyes.

 

There was even a TCM featurette with the original cast of The Wizard of Oz.  The Kansas scenes were all in black and white and filmed and then Tin Man makeup caused an allergic reaction.

 

I was thinking more of Jed than Barnaby because of the length of the show, but yes there were two shows.

 

Your thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...