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Musicals on Tap


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MGM had planned to make a film to be called "Broadway Melody Of 1943" and it was to star Gene Kelly and Eleanor Powell, but it never got made.  A boogie woogie dance number that Eleanor had filmed for that picture was edited into "Thousands Cheer" in 1943, which starred Gene Kelly and Kathryn Grayson.  Likewise, a film clip of Lena Horne singing "Honeysuckle Rose", which had also been filmed for "Broadway Melody Of 1943", was also edited into "Thousands Cheer".  Eleanor Powell left MGM in 1943 and married Glenn Ford that same year.  

Here is Eleanor's tap number:

 

Here is Lena's number:

 

 

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Apparently. studios hated to waste a good musical performance.  In making a well known musical, a song was recorded by a professional voice-over artist for an actress who's singing voice was normally dubbed.  However, the musical number was cut from the final release of that picture.  The recording was later lip-synced to by Joan Crawford in a movie.  Can you name the song, as well as the two movies and the voice artist?

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Joan Crawford "sang" Two-Faced Woman in Torch Song.  The number was actually sung by India Adams and had been originally recorded and intended for Cyd Charisse to lip-sync to in The Band Wagon.  Cyd Charisse did film the number, but it was ultimately deleted before the film's release.

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22 hours ago, starliteyes said:

After a supporting actress in this musical did her one solo number, she was no longer seen, even though her character had been featured in the story line all along.

Name the movie and actress and the reason for her disappearance.

I'll have to take a guess on this one.

Virginia Bruce was a supporting actress in "Born To Dance" and she sang the Oscar-winning song, "I've Got You Under My Skin" by Cole Porter.

Then she becomes difficult and refuses to perform in the musical within a musical, allowing her understudy, star Eleanor Powell, to save the day and the tap dancing finale:

"Three cheers for the red white and blue!"

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I'll have to take a guess on this one.

Virginia Bruce was a supporting actress in "Born To Dance" and she sang the Oscar-winning song, "I've Got You Under My Skin" by Cole Porter.

Then she becomes difficult and refuses to perform in the musical within a musical, allowing her understudy, star Eleanor Powell, to save the day and the tap dancing finale:

"Three cheers for the red white and blue!"

Good guess, Princess, but incorrect.  The supporting actress in question is a Virginia, but not Bruce.  Also the musical is from the 40's.

By the way, I've Got You Under My Skin, did not win the Oscar.  It was nominated, but lost out to The Way You Look Tonight from Swing Time.  This was back in the era when there really were Oscar-worthy songs being written.   

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4 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

Good guess, Princess, but incorrect.  The supporting actress in question is a Virginia, but not Bruce.  Also the musical is from the 40's.

By the way, I've Got You Under My Skin, did not win the Oscar.  It was nominated, but lost out to The Way You Look Tonight from Swing Time.  This was back in the era when there really were Oscar-worthy songs being written.   

Another guess. And I know this one won the Oscar. LOL

Virginia O'Brien singing 

"The Atchison Topeka and the Santa Fe" with Judy Garland in

  "The  Harvey Girls".

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I knew you'd get it, Princess.  I was surprised you didn't get it the first time.  Oh, you didn't mention it, but I'm sure you know that the reason for Virginia O'Brien suddenly disappearing from the movie was her pregnancy.  Because of delays in the shooting, she was starting to show too much, and so she just vanished after singing The Wild, Wild West.   

Okay, now it's your turn.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 This performer started and ended his career on Broadway singing and dancing in musicals.

He danced in Hollywood musicals and on comedy and variety TV shows in the 40s and 50s.

But his fans primarily knew him as a prominent versatile dramatic and comedic actor.

He was top box office in the 1940s and has retained his star status for posterity.

When you identify this performer, also list some of his Musical Hollywood Movies and ladies he danced with in the movies and on TV.

Hint#1: He is not primarily associated with musicals as a classic era movie star.

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On 12/19/2019 at 12:06 PM, Princess of Tap said:

 This performer started and ended his career on Broadway singing and dancing in musicals.

He danced in Hollywood musicals and on comedy and variety TV shows in the 40s and 50s.

But his fans primarily knew him as a prominent versatile dramatic and comedic actor.

He was top box office in the 1940s and has retained his star status for posterity.

When you identify this performer, also list some of his Musical Hollywood Movies and ladies he danced with in the movies and on TV.

Hint#1: He is not primarily associated with musicals as a classic era movie star.

Hint#2-- This performer was often paired with a popular actress of the era.

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Based on your last hint, I'm guessing that it's Van Johnson because he understudied Gene Kelly in Pal Joey.  Also Broadway musicals did bookend his years in films where he rarely made a musical.  As far as ladies he danced with in the movies, the only one I can think of is Lucille Bremer in Till the Clouds Roll By.  On TV, he appeared in an episode of "I Love Lucy" in which he sang and danced with Lucille Ball to How About You?

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11 hours ago, starliteyes said:

Based on your last hint, I'm guessing that it's Van Johnson because he understudied Gene Kelly in Pal Joey.  Also Broadway musicals did bookend his years in films where he rarely made a musical.  As far as ladies he danced with in the movies, the only one I can think of is Lucille Bremer in Till the Clouds Roll By.  On TV, he appeared in an episode of "I Love Lucy" in which he sang and danced with Lucille Ball to How About You?

Yes, Van was so popular with the ladies in the 1940s making those movies with June Allyson at MGM.

It's hard to believe that he started as a dancer because he didn't really do that many musical roles in the old movies.

Kudos Star, to you, for knowing all about Gene Kelly's Broadway understudy.

It's your turn--

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This musical contained a parody of a big Broadway hit that was still playing on Broadway at the time of the film’s release.  One of the supporting players in the movie, who was not a part of the parody, went on to star in the film adaptation of the hit show several years later.

Name the movie, the hit show and the performer who went on to star in the film version of it.

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13 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

Hint:  It was the feature film debut of the performer who would go on to star in the screen adaptation of the hit Broadway musical.

I'm going to guess on this one oh, but she was my mom's favorite dancer but certainly not mine.LOL

Mitzi Gaynor--

She made her feature film debut in "My Blue Heaven"and then she went on to star in "South Pacific".

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Next:

This dancer mixed many dance genres to come up with a modern dance style that typified ballet, jazz and Caribbean dance.

An academic, dancer and choreographer, this artist primarily appeared on Broadway but also appeared in a few films.

One film was an iconic groundbreaking musical, in which the dancer performed their own choreographed material.

When you identify this artist, also identify the iconic film.

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On 1/2/2020 at 1:01 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Next:

This dancer mixed many dance genres to come up with a modern dance style that typified ballet, jazz and Caribbean dance.

An academic, dancer and choreographer, this artist primarily appeared on Broadway but also appeared in a few films.

One film was an iconic groundbreaking musical, in which the dancer performed their own choreographed material.

When you identify this artist, also identify the iconic film.

Hint#1--The Iconic Musical mentioned above was from the 1940s.

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