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allaboutlana

2000 TO PRESENT MOVIE TRIVIA

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{font:Times New Roman}I know we like to discuss older movies, but this is a new thread for anyone interested in mixing a trivia game with more recent movies, from roughly 2000 to present.

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{font:Times New Roman}Here’s one to start: This 2006 movie was a remake of a story filmed twice before, once with Garbo and once with Eleanor Parker. Name the 2006 film and its two stars. {font}

 

 

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The 2006 film has the same title as Garbo's (1934), but Eleanor's (1957) has another title. Garbo's version was on TCM some time recently, in October, I think.

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1934 -- Garbo in *The Painted Veil*

 

1957 -- Parker in *The Seventh Sin*

 

2006 -- Naomi Watts and Edward Norton, returning to the title *The Painted* Veil

 

???

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Early in the first decade of the present Century. Talented young artist. Currently supporting herself as a wineshop barmaid, and house-sitting for a family that got posted abroad. Absolutely loopy over her married lover, and convinced he's going to leave his wife.

Distracted and playful; does a good drawing of the model her class is using, but then she puts her lover's face on the body. Reprimanded by the instructor, who then informs her that she has won a competition for an Art scholarship, and must produce fifteen paintings during the Summer break. She is guaranteed a showing.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Nov 6, 2011 1:18 AM

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The lover is an MD -- cardiologist. His wife is an attorney.

 

The artist borrows a friend's Moped. Returns with scratches and bruises and with dents in the Moped. A later revelation: The doctor's wife was run over by someone on a Moped, who left the scene. The incident terminated a pregnancy at five months.

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At one point she dresses up nicely, waits for him to pick her up to take her to his birthday party. After the miscarriage, dresses and packs, goes to the airport to meet him for a trip to Florence. On both these occasions, the doctor does not show up.

 

 

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Don't it though. Early in their story, when she is just starting to occupy and tend the house next door to his, he rushes home with a loosely-wrapped handful of flowers. He starts to rush into his house, then turns back to hand her one of the roses. "This is for you!" Later it is learned that he is in a hurry to get home to his wife, having just learned of her pregnancy.

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She tells a young girl, daughter of a friend, about her beginnings as an artist. In the studio of her artist father, there was little extra room, and Papa told her she could not have a pet kitty for that reason. She gathered up bits of cloth, string, scraps of trash, etc and glued them to the wall in an imaginative figure of a cat. That was her pet. In a later scene, it is found that she has fashioned a figure, in glue and scraps, on a wall in the house that she is not really taking care of any more. It is grotesque, but it is artful, and it clearly represents the form and face of the doctor. In its hand the figure holds the wilted and rotted rose that he handed to her on that day long ago when, per her interpretation, he declared his love for her.

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The doctor has a patient/stalker who is fixated on him. Shoves her way into exam room, rattles off symptoms, begins disrobing and says, "Examine me. It's comforting." The doctor focuses on this patient as the source of unwanted attentions and gifts. He's hardly even aware of the artist/housesitter next door. His wife moves out, also angred and suspicious about the attention and gifts. A confrontation with the patient becomes violent, and the doctor is under charges. The patient is then found dead, and the doctor is alibied by his artist/neighbor.

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The artist sees the doctor's stressful circumstances, and helps where she can (offing the patient/stalker, for one thing). She is observing from mid-distance when the doctor's estranged wife reappears and announces that she is the doctor's lawyer. It is seen that they embrace just before the police take him away in cuffs, after the wife instructs him not to talk to anyone. The artist goes home, turns on a gas stove without lighting a flame, and lies down on the floor to die.

 

Storytelling technique: The film rolls rapidly backward from this point to the earliest moments of the story. It goes forward again, telling all from the doctor's experience -- and there never was an affair.

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Well into the chronology of the doctor's experience of events, he is at home, having been bailed out by his wife. Commotion next door: Emergency Medical personnel, having responded to gas leak report, are wheeling out his housesitter-neighbor who has passed out. The doctor stops them; a quick examination shows they probably don't have time to get her to a hospital. He resuscitates her mouth to mouth, and her life is saved, including her fantasy life.

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As mentioned, earlier in this Century. In March of that year this foreign-language film came out in its native country. The following September, an American TVM (fact-based) came out that portrayed much the same situation. They both serve to explain to those who are not psychiatric professionals the term "erotomania." Briefly, this is a delusion that one is loved and admired by another. Often this fixation focuses on a famous person. In both these examples, the deluded were women, and the objects of their fixations were doctors. The foreign film used the rewind-and-tell-it twice device to get to both sides of the story. In the American TVM, the doctor's version comes out piecemeal by means of a defense attorney's investigation.

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Following a scene with a receptionist showing him a list of marked-through appointments, the doctor prepares to leave with his wife and start to put his life back together. Handling some of the things in his home, he has certain memories come back and begins to wonder...Entering the neighboring house, he finds the rag-scrap collage of himself on the wall. Remembers where that rose came from, and now he knows.

 

With her love and faith restored (he did kiss her and bring her back to life) she goes to his office and finds finds him moving items out of there. He solemnly tells her there is nothing between them and never was. A la felia...pas du tout. As he starts down a winding staircase with some bundles, she catches him in the back of the head with a heavy brass figurine and sends him to the bottom, badly hurt.

 

Vignettes in their seperate lives:

 

She does not go to trial, having been declared mentally incompetent by reason of extreme erotomania. Institutionalized, she is seen making a run for it and two very big attendants having a hard time bringing her down.

 

His vigilant wife eagerly calling the doctors to his bedside when it appears he's coming out of his coma. Scenes of painful rehabilitation, and soon small children appear.

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There have been a number of plots showing the dark side of one-sided/unrequited romantic fascination. *Play Misty For Me* and *Fatal Attraction* come to mind. The two stories that have been mentioned here both try to make a real-life point: Eratomania is sometimes a condition that does not go away. (It seems similar to some addictions and conditions such as pedophilia in that respect.) Control, (with hopes for medication), coupled with concealing is often the first resort. Long incarceration sometimes becomes necessary.

 

The American TVM (fact-based story) mentioned here progresses to a trial based on the woman's harassment of the doctor and his family. She primps in anticipation of the doctor's testimony, glad he'll be able to see her again. She scornfully rejects any plea of insanity or reduced capacity -- her version is the true one, to her. Her case has not involved homicide, and her behavior, bizarre as it was, did not rise to the level that would allow the Court to impose an insanity verdict and bypass trial and go to treatment. Found guilty, she is sentenced to prison, with advice to make use of the psychiatric opportunities there. She is the only passenger on the caged bus to the pen; the driver and the corrections officer see her in animated conversation with no one. In her own mind, she's chatting with a supportive friend, a talented reporter who won't name sources and who sasses judges, who is always having troubles of her own, at the same time this woman is incarcerated again. The audience gets far into the story before learning this person is not real. Checked into the prison, she is called aside by the prison doctor, who has been alerted to the nutcase coming in. Her imaginary friend thinks he's hot. The new convict enters the doctor's office, sits and crosses her legs, and prepares to transfer her mania.

 

The foreign film discussed here is from France, in French and subtitled. The woman is seen after four years of inpatient care, reiterating to her psychiatrist a full description of her condition. She knows she is delusional; she knows she must continue her rigid schedule of taking her medications. The shrink congratulates her on completing her treatment, and pronounces her free to be released. The proviso to stay on her meds in still in force. She is seen from behind, walking down the covered walkway where she was previously seen attempting to escape the attendants. In the room she occupied, a workman is seen moving aside a large dresser. On the wall behind it he finds a life-sized collage picturing the doctor in her mania; quite a good likeness. It is made up of what looks like years worth of variously-colored pills, glued to the wall The workman, evidently not aware of what this means, takes a paint scraper and starts scraping away this evidence. The doctor is out there somewhere, and she is free.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Nov 14, 2011 12:17 AM

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Issue date in France, 27 Mar 2002. Title *A la folie...pas tu tout*. In English *He Loves Me...He Loves Me Not*. Delightful French pixie Audrey Tautout brought the fetching charm of 2001's *Amelie* to the role of the love-focused artist. Her self-assurance in her view of the world is convincing to the confidants around her -- her fellow worker, a medical student loopy over her and jealous of the doctor. And the audience can believe in her for quite some time. Riveting film.

 

The similar story in the American TVM *Obsessed*, issued 22 Sept 2002, is carried by the performance of Jenna Elfman in the role of the real-life Ellena Roberts. And support-role performances make the story even more riveting. I know Ms. Elfman's work mostly from comedy, but she brings serious acting chops to this dramatic role as well. *Obsessed* shows up a couple of times a year on Lifetime Movie Network, usually on their "True Story Thursday" lineup.

 

Both these stories are worth the viewers' time.

 

Open thread.

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Fact-based. A death-by-gunshot, ruled a suicide, but with many unanswered questions.

"Since when do suicides miss twice, lay down on a rug and start over? Is that normal? Just asking."

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Correct, lavender, at some 66 Views.

On two occasions, I happened to observe something that was enacted in the movie *Hollywoodland*. In 1957 or so, I saw a re-issue of *From Here To Eternity* with my family, in a theater. At the scene where Burt Lancaster and George Reeves are conversing while walking on the verandah at Schofield Barracks, my mother commented that that was the guy who played Superman on TV.

 

Seeing the movie caused me to look up the book, and I read it at least three times over the next several years. // Mid-1960s, in the Common Room of a college dorm, I was watching a matinee of *Eternity* with a number of other students. At that same scene, one of the couchpotatoes gleefully shouted "Superman!", and pointed Mr. Reeves out to all present. I had long ago forgotten that point.

 

And *Hollywoodland* includes a scene about the world premier of *From Here To Eternity*, which indicates that the same thing happened in the theater when people in the audience recognized Mr Reeves in that scene. It's portrayed as embarrassment to the actor.

 

lavenderblue19's thread.

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