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allaboutlana

2000 TO PRESENT MOVIE TRIVIA

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British. A homicide to solve. All the traditional trappings: Amateur sleuths aiding the police. Red herrings. ALL clues are given, but some of them cloaked in misdirection. One of the investigators with a different agenda. All the cliches.

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An elderly, sickly woman is killed. The first suspect is the overworked daughter who has the burden of caring for her. But a note found nearby generates another theory.

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At the local college, a Professor of Physics (PHD) finds a seeming pattern in the homicide and some deaths that follow. Notes found at each scene, all with numbers written on them, suggest that a system following a numerical progression may be involved in the selection of victims and the different methods of the killings. A brilliant star pupil of the professor (an American) becomes interested also, and the two of them are consulted by the police at each new incident, each new clue.

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The theory develops that the killer may be a physicist. Or at least that a person trained in that discipline may be the clues-dropping killer. It focuses attention on that department of the college, and some quirky eggheads turn up. One, a German-born student, gives an impression of knowing something significant to the case.

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At one point, the murder mystery is laid aside briefly while the physicists gather in a classroom to hear one of their number give the solution to a famous theorem that has lasted some six hundred years. Polite applause from a small group. It is while walking away from this meeting that they have some new case-related information turn up.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on May 24, 2012 5:00 PM

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(2,627)

At some 120 Views.

Seeming to fit into the numerical progression, a group of mentally-handicapped children die in a bus crash. Or did they die because the bus driver's beautiful and intelligent daughter needed a lung transplant?

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The setting, the atmosphere of this story brings to mind works such as *Good Will Hunting*, *A Beautiful Mind*, and even the sitcom *The Big Bang Theory* in its portrayal of the academic environment peopled by mathematics and physics aces. The overlay of standard crime-solving points makes it familiar, and it also contributes to the whodunnit fun.

 

To give away an important point: The children are murdered in order for the busdriver's daughter to get her lung transplant. This is accomplished, but the driver himself loses his own life in the "accident". There is false "evidence" planted at other "crime scenes".

 

Edited by: flashback42 on May 27, 2012 11:57 AM

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In fact, the "B.B. Theory" gang might enjoy this movie, considering their own taste in entertainment.

One of the leads of this film, in another context, actually came under the spell of "the one Ring that rules them all", but then the ring-bearing finger was bitten off, and he was spared that fate. Another of the leads -- well, a newborn alien ate its way out of his belly through his ribcage, looked around and growled at everybody, and then skit-skittered across the table and made its escape.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on May 29, 2012 2:11 PM

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I bought a second hand copy of "The Oxford Murders" from Blockbuster but fell asleep trying to watch it...I guess it's not in the same class as "The Name Of The Rose"...However, I'll try to get a copy of the book by Guillermo Martinez. It might prove more interesting....

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Nearing 320 Views, skipper. I used some misdirection of my own, when I mentioned the nearby "college", rather than "university." The general impression, I think, is that Oxford in a one-industry town.

 

It's a matter of taste, I guess, but I do like the Agatha Christe - type of tale with the misdirection, etc. I saw it on one of the Premium Channels, and Amazon is slowly shipping me my own copy now. I hope you do enjoy it on a second viewing.

 

mudskipper's thread.

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Released within the period appropriate for this Thread. Color. UK. Fact-based. Overall, a problem play focused on medical advances in treating women's issues. Victorian Era setting. Existing conditions included: The story about "germs" being involved in disease and infection was just a theory, and was not accepted by many members of the medical community. That stuff about washing your hands and frequently changing to clean bandages -- simply not true. // Current treatment of "women's problems" dated as far back as the 16th Century, where it seemed to work well for "widows and women in religious orders."

 

"Pelvic manipulation" by hand was the procedure employed, and an MD could build a good practice around it. One doctor found himself with painful spasms in his hands from using this method. Then the advance -- to an electrical device that worked for the same purpose.

 

At this time, electrical power came only from a steam-driven generator that you brought into your house. They started at about the size of a large steamer trunk, and got bigger from there. The new device looked something like a modern hand-held electric drill. The doctor and his dilettante friend tested it carefully before going to other doctors to introduce it. Found it produced "parixisms" easily, and faster than the hand manipulation used before. They hadn't yet named the device, but an early test subject advised them to find a name "so's a girl will know what to ask for." Suggested names included "rubby-nubby", "excitator", "parixiamater" and 'vibratorium.' Eventually it was manufactured and sold directly to the user (bypassing the doctor's office) under the name "jolly molly".

 

And this is all fact-based. The Film?

 

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Improvements in this field were achieved when electricity became a widespread and reasonably-priced resource. Another great leap came about when dependable batteries were made available.

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Yes, *Hysteria*. I didn't expect it last long because it's so recent, but I enjoyed it. I was only vaguely aware of the subject matter, but I saw it for another reason: When Maggie Gyllenhaal makes a movie, I get around to it sooner or later.

 

As I watched the developing story, things I had observed and learned over a long period were called to mind.:

> > Early 1960s: A satirical magazine, I think the National Lampoon, ran a feature of several pages spoofing the early Sears & Roebuck catalogue advertisements for the "exciter" devices.

> > Sometime in the 90s, I believe: I read somewhere that the sex toy called a "****" had been introduced into society via doctors' offices, where they were used to treat "female problems."

> > Janeane Garofalo had a line in *The Truth About Cats and Dogs* about her character's current status with no man in her life: "After all, this is the electronics age."

> > And, source not remembered, I was aware that the idea of female "hysteria" was removed as a medical diagnosis some time in the 1950s.The movie has an "R" rating, based of subject matter alone. There are none of the on-screen images that usually go with such a rating. A couple of the sidebar interviews on the disc provide some additional legal and historical perspectives. Commentaries on the current laws in Texas are interesting.ScrewballDame's thread.

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Interesting.

 

This is a film adaptation of a beloved comic centered around two girls. One of the girls is an aspiring artist and the drawings sketched out in her notebook are actually the works of a different comic writer, underground legend, Robert Crumb, his wife Aline Kominsky, and their daughter Sophie.

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No, not that one.

 

There's a scene in the film where the girls are visiting a comic book store called Zine-O-Phobia run by an actual xenophobe and on the shelves are some of the comics created by the author of the comic the film is based on. The titles are, Eightball, Pussey! and David Boring.

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This is in reference to a 2012 film. A young actress, who started acting in 2003, wrote this film and starred in it as the title role, as someone who suddenly comes to life. Name the actress and film.

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