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Ascotrudgeracer

"Joe MacBeth" (1955) Worst Disaster Possible!

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I had hoped to watch it because the description sounded interesting. It is sad to say I forgot until it was nearly over.

 

I wonder if the actors referred to it as 'the Scottish movie' during its production.

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The idea for the movie wasn't all that crazy. It just appeared exceeding puerile, not written well enough to be taken so seriously. After all, this wasn't the first time a Shakespearean work has been turned into a contemporary storyline. Orson Welles and his Mercury Theater group had performed up to date versions of several Shakespearean plays. The most memorable was a modern staged version of "Julius Caesar" that turned out to be a direct affront at Fascist Itlay during the late 1930's.

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*Throne of Blood* (1957) is an excellent adaptation of Macbeth set in feudal Japan.

 

Macbeth (2010) is a television movie starring Patrick Stewart and is set in a modern totalitarian state. It is a very powerful and compelling adaptation.

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Regardless of any Shakespeare connection, the film was low-budget, poorly directed, and poorly made.

 

During the chase and car wreck sequence at the beginning, they used stock footage of three different cars that was supposed to be the same car. One car from the 1950s, another from 1938, and another one from the early '30s or late '20s, all supposed to be the same car. And they used a high-contrast copy of some other movie's chase scene, instead of filming a new chase scene.

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So were any of the Ruth Roman films today good? I first saw her playing a saloonkeeper in an episode of Gunsmoke called "Coreyville" (at least, that was the town the episode was set in, and I think that was the title). I really liked her portrayal of the tough saloonkeeper who would stand up to the town matriarch (I called Roman's character the "Miss Kitty" of that town), and then I saw her playing a scientist in an episode of The Outer Limits. But I missed most of her films today as I wasn't feeling well. I did catch a bit of Down Three Dark Streets and it looked interesting, especially since it starred Broderick Crawford, who I really like on Highway Patrol. I wasn't able to watch much because I was too sick to concentrate. But my, how much Ruth Roman aged between these movies in the 50s and the TV episodes I saw her in no more than ten years later in the 60s! I hardly recognized her! The way I first recognized her in one of the movies today was by that unmistakable husky voice, rather than her appearance.

 

Robbie

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It was awful, as were most of the other movies before it.

 

Poor Paul Douglas, I was embarrassed for him. His timing was impeccable, wasn't it? No cell phones, yet he knew exactly when gourmand guy would be having his crepes. Good thing fat guy grabbed them away from his minions, or he would have figured it out.

 

Who was the fat guy, btw? He was really lapping up his role. Good at math, too, when it came to oysters.

 

Nice seeing all the old cars, though.

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I got home in time to catch "Rebel in Town" and I thought Ruth Roman was miscast -- looked a bit too old for the part, but then the same could have been said about John Payne. Still, it wasn't completely unknown in the 1870s for people appearing to be in their early to mid 40s to have a 10 year old.

 

That was an interesting movie, with a band of outlaw brothers and their father operating on the outskirts of a town. I immediately thought of similarities with "The Big Country," and as it turns out "Rebel in Town" was from 1956 and "Big Country" from 1958.

 

Will catch up with my time-delay of "Joe MacBeth" sometime this weekend. But now I'm not sure I'm looking forward to it! :-)

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>So were any of the Ruth Roman films today good?

 

They were fun to watch, and they were new films. She was beautiful. She should have been in better films and should have been more famous.

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She was in a few good films. Champion (I think?) and Strangers on a Train to name two........ Wasnt she in a film with Pat Neal and Eleanor Parker ? (Havent seen that one......)

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British films that tried being American where always bad the only good thing in Joe Macbeth is Bonar Colleano the British film industries perpetual quick taking "Yank". I have always wondered how his career might have gone had he repatriated himself back to the US after the war, sadly he was killed in an auto accident in 1958. I have seen him in numerous Brit film mostly in supporting roles and have always thought with a few breaks he could have had a marvellous career.

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Columbia didn't have much better luck with 1990's MEN OF RESPECT, another Macbeth gangster attempt. Nice cast though with John Tuturro, Peter Boyle, Dennis Farina and Rod Steiger. It ws certainly better than this turkey.

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>British films that tried being American where always bad the only good thing in Joe Macbeth is Bonar Colleano the British film industries perpetual quick taking "Yank".

 

Thanks for the information. That might account for all the oddities. Filmed in England. Ok.

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"...All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand....Oh Oh Oh..."

 

Sorry, this has nothing to do with anything, really. Just, whenever Macbeth is mentioned, I always think of all the great speeches in it. I have heard that Lady MacBeth's madness speech, part of which is excerpted above, is a real plum for actresses to tackle ( hmm, I can't really imagine tackling a plum - oh well, you all know what I mean.)

 

I also really love the opening speech from the Three Witches ( aka The Three Weird Sisters)

 

 

"When shall we three meet again?

In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

 

 

When the hurly burly's done,

When the battle's lost and won..."

 

 

And of course, "Fair is foul/ And foul is fair/ Hover through the fog and filthy air."

 

 

These lines are not only attention -getting and key to the entire play, they're fun to speak.

 

 

Come to think of it, Macbeth be one of my favourite Shakespeare plays.

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"Never shake thy gory locks at me."

 

Poor old Macbeth - trying to reason with a ghost. The Banquo ghost scene, if done well, can be deliciously scary.

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The best US noirs are made in the US with US crews. The best British noirs and Dickens films are made in England with English crews.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> hmm, I can't really imagine tackling a plum

 

Fruit wrestling is a greatly under-appreciated sport. If a cherry is pitted against a grape it will be a crushing defeet. Good girls never let the banana win. One must be careful to avoid the after-match drinking parties unless they like stewed fruit.

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