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Japanese American Concentration Camps


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If we could go back and change every bad thing in the 20th Century, I'd be for it. Including changing the bad Japs who started WW II in the Pacific and who had spies working on the US West Coast in 1941. Those bad guys caused a lot of problems for honest and honorable Japanese Americans living on the West Coast.

 

See this. This is the reason for the war-time relocation centers:

 

http://www.fas.org/irp/ops/ci/docs/ci2/2ch2_a.htm

 

Decoded messages regarding Japanese spies on the West Coast in 1941 being directed from Japan:

 

"The items selected for this chapter pertain to Japanese intelligence activities during 1941.

...

From: Tokyo (Matsuoka)

30 January 1941

To: Washington (Koshi) #44

 

(Foreign Office secret).

...

(6) Utilization of our "Second Generation" and our resident nationals. (In view of the fact that if there is any slip in this phase, our people in the U.S. will be subjected to considerable persecution, and the utmost caution must be exercised.)

 

---------------------

 

From: Los Angeles (Nakauchi

9 May 1941

To: Tokyo (Gaimudaijin) #067

 

Strictly Secret.

 

Re your message #180 to Washington.

 

We are doing everything in our power to establish outside contacts in connection with our efforts to gather intelligence material. In this regard, we have decided to make use of white persons and Negroes, through Japanese persons whom we can't trust completely. (It not only would be very difficult to hire U.S. (military?) experts for this work at the present time, but the expenses would be exceedingly high.) We shall, furthermore, maintain close connections with Japanese Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the newspapers.

 

With regard to airplane manufacturing plants and other military establishments in other parts, we plan to establish very close relations with various organizations and in strict secrecy have them keep these military establishments under close surveillance. Through such means, we hope to be able to obtain accurate and detailed intelligence reports. We have already established contact with absolutely reliable Japanese in the San Pedro and San Diego area, who keep a close watch on all shipments of airplanes and other war materials, and report the amounts and destinations of such shipments. The same steps have been taken with regard to traffic across the U.S.-Mexico border."

 

------------------------------------------

 

And here are the Canadian internment camps:

 

Japanese internment camps in CANADA during WW II:

 

MAP OF CANADIAN CAMPS:

 

canadamap.gif

 

Japanese being hauled to Canadian internment camp in a cattle truck:

 

ph-203ht.jpg

 

Article:

The Internment Camps of Japanese Canadians In Canada During World War II

http://timeinmoments.wordpress.com/2007/11/06/the-internment-camps-of-japanese-canadians-in-canada-during-world-war-ii/

 

Tashme Camp in Canada in snow (burrrrr):

 

3_4.jpg

 

Canadian Notice Poster:

 

japannot.gif

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Joke circulating ca. 1944:

 

Question: What's the difference between Japanese and American internment camps?

 

Answer: One is full of american citizens, and the other is. . . . the other is. . . .

 

You know, it worked better when I heard it.

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Face it Fred, the Japanese Americans were far less of a threat than German Americans, during WWII. The reason we locked up the Japanese, and not the Germans, is because the Japanese have 'yellow' skin. They are 'the other.' The Germans are 'us.' Neither should have been locked up wholesale. Exclusion zones around ports, military bases, war factories, for those without permits, well, I can see that.

 

I've read more than once that there were NO Japanese Americans in the US charged with espionage during WWII, but lots of German Americans were. I'm not sure how to reconcile that with what you've posted.

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Now, ya see VX?! Fred is tryin' to make a very "valid" point here: If Yoshi-san pictured below here hadn't been forcibly removed from his strawberry farm in Gardena CA in '42, then he probably would've NEVER have had the opportunity to go trout fishing like this along the Owens River!!!

 

:^0

 

(...yep, you're right...sometimes I DO "kill myself" laughing at my own jokes...or should I have said "commit Hari-kari" laughing this hard?!)

 

 

:^0

 

 

Edited by: Dargo on Dec 22, 2011 6:51 PM

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Beddini: What are you doing here?
Travers: What are *you* doing here?
B: Yes, but this is my room!
T: Yes, but this is *my* room.
B: So (takes key from pocket), but I have the key!
T: So (takes key from pocket), but *I* have the key.
B: But I am *Beddini* !
T: You got me there, pal.

Eric Rhodes and Fred Astaire
Top Hat


Edited by: slaytonf on Dec 22, 2011 11:09 PM
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Eeh! 'At's-a no good! I think'a I like-a this-a one better...

 

Baravelli: ...you can't come in unless you give the password.

Professor Wagstaff: Well, what is the password?

Baravelli: Aw, no. You gotta tell me. Hey, I tell what I do. I give you three guesses. It's the name of a fish.

Professor Wagstaff: Is it "Mary?"

Baravelli: HA! 'At's-a no fish!

Professor Wagstaff: She isn't? Well, she drinks like one! ...Let me see... Is it "Sturgeon"?

Baravelli: Aw, you-a craze. A "sturgeon", he's a doctor cuts you open when-a you sick. Now I give you one more chance.

Wagstaff: I got it! "Haddock".

Baravelli: 'At's a-funny, I got a "haddock" too.

Wagstaff: What do you take for a "haddock"?

Baravelli: Sometimes I take an aspirin, sometimes I take a calomel.

Wagstaff: Y'know, I'd walk a mile for a calomel.

Baravelli: You mean chocolate calomel? I like-a that too, but you no guess it. [--Slams door. Wagstaff knocks again.|http://Slams door. Wagstaff knocks again. Baravelli opens peephole again.]

[ Baravelli opens peephole again.|http://Slams door. Wagstaff knocks again. Baravelli opens peephole again.] Hey, what's-a matter, you no understand English? You can't come in here unless you say, "Swordfish." Now I'll give you one more guess.

Professor Wagstaff: ...swordfish, swordfish... I think I got it. Is it "swordfish"

Baravelli: Hah. That's-a it. I guess it.

Professor Wagstaff: Pretty good, eh?!

 

 

(...hey...don't-a blame-a ME...slaytonf took-a this-a thread in THIS-A direction!!!...oh and btw, THIS was from *Horse Feathers* , of course...and I sure hope I DON'T have to tell anyone here WHO played Baravelli and Professor Wagstaff)

 

;)

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> {quote:title=slaytonf wrote:}{quote}And you made many good points, VX, that would have been worth making had FredCDobbs been interested in serious discussion, rather than mere provocation.

 

 

Well, I guess we can all see now who's interested in serious discussion and who's interested in mere provocation.

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Ouch, that hurt.

 

In any case, this thread will be worthwhile at least because we will eventually be presented with all the photos Ansel Adams took of the Manzanar Camp.

 

Minus the barbed wire fences and guard towers with machine-gun emplacements, that is. The U. S. government was delicate on that matter.

 

Those cheerleaders, they're a dangerous bunch.

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>In any case, this thread will be worthwhile at least because we will eventually be presented with all the photos Ansel Adams took of the Manzanar Camp.

>

>Minus the barbed wire fences and guard towers with machine-gun emplacements, that is.

 

 

Where are those machine-gun towers??

 

manzanar_mural50.jpg

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This photo is rare evidence of a little known clandestine intelligence/reconnaissance project conducted by the Army at Twenty-nine Palms, developing a cadre of fifty-foot tall photographers, complete with hand rails. Before deploying them to the jungles of Southeast Asia, they tested them at the Japanese internment camps.

 

 

Hint: The one place you can't take a picture *of* is the place you're taking a picture *from*.

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>This photo is rare evidence of a little known clandestine intelligence/reconnaissance project conducted by the Army at Twenty-nine Palms, developing a cadre of fifty-foot tall photographers, complete with hand rails.

 

LOL. I saw the hand railing. I didn't crop it out of the picture. I knew the photo was taken from atop the guard tower.

 

But you said: *guard towers (plural) with machine-gun emplacements*

 

So where are the other towers and the machine-gun emplacements you spoke of?

 

---------------------------

 

Girls volleyball at Manzanar:

 

photo72.jpg

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From Dictionary.com:

 

leg?er?de?main   [lej-er-duh-meyn]

noun

1. sleight of hand.

2. trickery; deception.

3. any artful trick.

 

And (I blush to say) from Wikipedia:

 

leight of hand depends on the use of psychology, timing, misdirection, and natural choreography in accomplishing a magical effect. Misdirection is perhaps the most important component of the art of sleight of hand. The magician choreographs his actions so that all spectators are likely to look where he or she wants them to. More importantly, they do not look where the performer does not wish them to look.

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One of the internees was actor Tetsu Komai, whom some of you may remember as the head boy in William Wyler's THE LETTER. Here is an ink drawing done of Komai at Gila Camp:

 

janm_97.106.2FD_a.jpg

 

Here is Komai with Gale Sondergaard in THE LETTER:

 

letter_komai.jpg

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