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The Thin Man and Noir!! Grooving Thurs and Fri on TCM!!!


markbeckuaf
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Man, if you've never seen them, or all of them...or if you have and just totally dig 'em like I do, TCM is airing the entire Thin Man series--6 flix--count 'em!!! All night tonight (Thursday), and in prime time! Over night, into the morning hours!!! Since I'm off tomorrow, I'm gonna pull an all-nighter!!! And if you are still awake or getting up early, there is another mystery series flick airing in the early AM---ALIAS BOSTON ****!!! At 9:30AM EST, a rarely screened noir, COVER-UP (1949)!!!, and all night in prime time on Friday, noir, noir, noir!!! With the Christmas theme, natch!!! BACKFIRE (1950), LADY IN THE LAKE (1946), and MURDER, MY SWEET (1944)!!!

 

I'm especially excited because I have some time off and can actually watch some of these flicks live and not from the DVR!

 

Wow, what holiday treats for mystery and noir fans like me!!! Groove hard!!

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I may not remember them exactly as I have not watched them in months.

 

*The Thin Man* (1934) has a wonderfully funny scene of Christmas morning.

 

I believe it is *After The Thin Man* (1936) which begins on New Year's Eve. They are at a house where they find a problem and they go straight to a night club where there is a Midnight kiss.

 

I do not think any of the others of the Thin Man movies is specific about any holiday or if it is it is not overt.

 

*Alias Boston ***** (1942) takes place during several days after a prison escape during a Christmas show.

 

*Lady in the Lake* (1946) has a Christmas day scene.

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Thank you, SansFin! I didn't know that about some of the flix!

 

Audrey, I think all 3 of the noir's in primetime have something going on with Christmas, as they are on a theme of Christmas Noir! That's BACKFIRE, LADY IN THE LAKE, and MURDER, MY SWEET. For the life of me, I can't remember what is related in two of them, but LADY IN THE LAKE actually has a pretty strong Christmas theme, something I always thought a little odd for a noir, but it works out!!

 

As for the others, thank you, SansFin!! :)

 

We're getting let out early from work, so plenty of time to get all settled in for the night for the Thin Man all-night marathon!!! Groove out!

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> {quote:title=markbeckuaf wrote:

> }{quote}Man, if you've never seen them, or all of them...or if you have and just totally dig 'em like I do, TCM is airing the entire Thin Man series--6 flix--count 'em!!! All night tonight (Thursday), and in prime time! Over night, into the morning hours!!!

 

And watch for Shemp Howard (of The Three Stooges) in ANOTHER THIN MAN (1939).

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I have the entire collection of "The Thin Man"...what a pure delight. Very enjoyable! Love! It's $29.99 dollars at BARNES&NOBLE.

 

 

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All of the movies on Dec. 23 have Christmas content. Many of them are well known for their holiday content (e.g., SUSAN SLEPT HERE; THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER; 3 GODFATHERS), and other folks have already accurately described some others. In addition, COVER-UP is a William Bendix crime film that's set during the holiday season. BACKFIRE starts at Christmas, with one of the main characters in a post-WW2 veteran's hospital, but that's about it for the holiday content -- but it's a fairly good noir about one vet trying to clear his army buddy of a murder rap. (I don't remember the holiday content in MURDER MY SWEET, but I do remember it as an excellent noir starring Dick Powell as Chandler's Phillip Marlowe).

 

By the way, several of the noir films on tomorrow's schedule were suggested in a thread on the message boards just after last Christmas, as were some others that TCM has shown during December. Thanks once again to the TCM programmers for listening to our requests and showing some unusual Christmas movies in addition to the beloved classics!

 

 

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> {quote:title=willbefree25 wrote:

> }{quote}Anyone else put off by how Bendix was written in Cover-Up?

>

> So, who was the murderer?

>

>

> Plus, if that was a Plymouth with a green plaid interior, I got carsick in a car just like that when I was three years old. Ahh, good times.

>

My apologies, but I don't want to divulge the ending of the story, which would spoil the fun for those who haven't seen COVER-UP yet. (I just finished watching it all the way through this morning, after having seen only part of it the first time around last year.) There's a lot Christmas content in this story about an insurance investigator (Dennis O'Keefe) who comes to a small town during the holiday season to look into the apparent suicide of a prominent, but despised, citizen of a small town. He has reason to believe it's not suicide, of course, so there's quite a story.

 

I was kind of surprised that William Bendix was billed as the star of COVER-UP, because he actually had a much smaller role, as the town sheriff, than O'Keefe did as the insurance investigator. Bendix was very good in the part, however. After enjoying him in his radio series "The Life of Riley," where he's a good-hearted but not-very-bright guy, I was glad to see Bendix playing a more intelligent character. (I'm not saying anything against Chester A. Riley, though, who is one of the great comic characters from old time radio!)

 

Just to add my two cents on the Thin Man discussion, the 6-movie box set is well worth the purchase price, as all of the Thin Man movies are a lot of fun. There's also a smaller 4-movie set for those who might not want to spend as much or aren't major fans of Powell and Loy, but if you enjoy the Thin Man movies at all, I'd recommend going for the larger set.

 

To quote Irving Berlin: "Happy Holiday!"

 

Edited by: BingFan on Dec 23, 2011 12:20 PM

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I was really enjoying *Cover-Up* until the end. Awful dialog, implausible characterizations, a few bizarre characters (the maid!), and plot holes so big you could drive a truck through them!

 

Did I mention musical themes reminded me of the main theme of Bernard Herrmann's score to *Marnie* ? Oh, this was one screwed-up little movie.

 

And then they came up with a cop-out for an ending.

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That's what I read at IMDb, Fedya. I turned it off with 30 minutes to go, so I was spared. I think it was the last time O'Keefe didn't escalate Bendix for not doing his job.

 

Backfire was better, much better. Although confusing, I liked the flashbacks within the expositions. Not a great noir, but imo, one that deserves to be shown more often.

 

Anyone else creeped out by RO's, ahem, work? At one point he opened his eyes really wide and, well, ew.

 

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I have a question. I believe that in the original movie *The Thin Man* (1934) the title refers to the father/researcher/inventor as contradiction to the fat man supposedly found buried in his laboratory.

 

Why do the titles of the other movies in the series refer to a character who does not appear in any of them?

 

I am sure this question has been asked before. I have looked many places and I can not find an answer.

 

Can any person here please enlighten me?

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Poetic/screenwriter license.

 

Because the "Thin Man" title was used for the subsequent movies, there is a widespread misapprehension that the term refers to Nick Charles himself; in fact it refers to Clyde Wynant, the mysterious and eccentric patriarch who is the main concern of the plot. A skeletonized body, found during the investigation, had been assumed to be that of a "fat man" due to its being found in clothing from a much heavier man. This clothing is revealed to be a diversion, and the identity of the body is finally revealed as that of a particular "thin man" instead— the missing Wynant. The murder has been disguised in a way to frame Wynant, by people who have stolen a great deal of money from Wynant and killed him, on the night he was last seen.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thin_Man

 

The writers assumed, correctly, that the viewing audience associated The Thin Man with Nick Charles.

 

I never knew that Hammett was not involved with any of the succeeding movies. I bet he was kicking himself.

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Thanks for that information, WillBeFree. I knew that Nick Charles was not the "Thin Man" but I never knew who was "The Thin Man". I learn so much reading the Message Board, Thank You.

 

I appreciate that the programmers at TCM not only ran all the Thin Man movies, one after another but they did it on a night that many people had off work the next day. I did watch every movie but unfortunately some only long enough that I opened my eyes and tried to figure out which movie it was and then my eyes closed again. I hope TCM will run the movies again and instead of watching it in bed I will sit on hard chair.

 

 

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