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Anne Sheridan Bio


Terry Sherwood
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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}For 90% of the population, though, the mention of Ann Sheridan's name would be met with a resounding "Who?". Sad but true.

I'm with you finance. I think the longer time goes by, the less interest a project like this would have. Also, I would expect most, if not all, of the people who worked with her are now deceased. A book on her life in 2011 would probably have to read more like a guide to her career. I like Ann Sheridan and would support a book on her, but honestly, I would take the details with a grain of salt.

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I always liked Ann Sheridan. Aside from being a very sexy lady with a tart delivery of a wise crack, she also came across on screen as being very down to earth and, well, a regular guy. She seemed like a realist without too many illusions about herself or anything else.

 

Apparently that was an extension of the actress herself. In a 1965 interview with a writer for Screen Facts she was at one point asked what was her impression of her position in film history.

 

Her response: "It's just one of those things that will be written off, for heaven's sake. It won't mean a thing."

 

If Ann Sheridan could have peered into the future then and read the comments that now appear on this thread about people no longer caring about her, she wouldn't have been a bit surprised. I, for one, am sorry that she was correct.

 

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If, by "general public," you mean people other than those who tune in to TCM on a regular basis, I seriously question how much great Garbo's name means to anyone today. Hepburn and Davis, yes, and Crawford probably because of the Mommie Dearest rep. If Rogers is remembered (and I don't really think she is particularly), it's only because of her collaboration with Astaire. Dietrich's name would have been up there, to some degree, I suspect. Judy Garland because of the Wizard of Oz is also remembered.

 

For that matter, though, how many of the men still have real name recognition with the general public? John Wayne has to be at the top of the list in fame but then his career outlasted that of so many others, extending into the '70s. The others, I think, would be Cary Grant, James Stewart, Bogart, Gene Kelly (because of Singin in the Rain), Gable (because of Gone with the Wind), Bing Crosby (because of his Christmas connection), Bob Hope, Chaplin and I think that's pretty well it for '30s and '40s male stars. Maybe Astaire. I'm not even certain that Cagney's name means much anymore. Maybe Flynn because of Robin Hood.

 

 

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I have also always liked Ann Sheridan and have enjoyed her performances in many films but I'm not sure I would purchase an Ann bio and I'm a classic movie nut. It isn't that I don't like or even love these stars but only that I'm really not that interested in reading an entire book about them.

 

I would rather get a book like Warner Stars of the 30s and 40s, where many stars are given a few pages or so about their personal lives as well as some of the better movies they were in during the period. Hey, no such book exist as far as I know. But if there was one I would buy it.

 

I do have books about Davis (her 2 books as well as a 3rd party bios), and Olivia DeHavilland and Joan Fontaine (both their bios as well as a book called Sisters), the Lauren Bacall book and one on Garbo and one on Cary Grant. I got these books years ago when I first got into classic movies because at the time these where the stars that interested me. But today I don't have that same level of interest in their personal lives but a lot more about the movies of the era (so if I get a book it is mostly about the movies they made and stories related to those movies). Maybe I would get a book about Mitchum but other than him, I cannot think on anyone else.

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*I would rather get a book like Warner Stars of the 30s and 40s, where many stars are given a few pages or so about their personal lives as well as some of the better movies they were in during the period. Hey, no such book exist as far as I know. But if there was one I would buy it.*

 

 

I own this book below, and love it! Sometimes his opinions about certain films are off the mark and get catty sometimes, but otherwise it's chock-full of info.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Hollywood-Film-Actors-Vol/dp/1557835519/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1325206038&sr=8-1-fkmr0

 

 

 

 

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The closest I can come to an Ann Sheridan biography is a book I purchased many years ago. It's called "The Forties Gals" and gives an in-depth biograhy of six very talented ladies of that era. She had an interesting life, but, as some of you have said, a full-length bio of her probably would just sit on the bookshelves (except for us TCM fans).

 

Terrence.

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If we're talking people in their 20's and 30's, the only classic films stars they can name are Monroe, Wayne, Hepburn (Audrey) and maybe Sophia Loren and Liz Taylor.

 

That's it for the majority of the population in that age group. Trust me I know, because I'm in that age group and have gathered as much from people.

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Jeff, you left out James Dean and Elvis Presley. In other words, excluding John Wayne, you don't think they know anyone from the pre-'50s period and Wayne they would know, of course, because his career was such a long one. You may well be right. Even Bogart, rediscovered by youth in the '60s, even his legend may diminish with future generations.

 

At least two other names will live on, I feel, though. Judy Garland because of the Wizard of Oz, and Bing Crosby, because of his films and music getting so much play at Christmas. But I guess that Crosby and Garland will hardly be names that young people think much about, other than that

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*If Crosby will live on, so will Sinatra, though the bulk of the latter's career was somewhat later.*

I have a theory about that. Because of the Christmas connection Crosby's name is guaranteed to live on, while Sinatra, since he's not associated with any particular season or holiday of the year like Bing, doesn't have quite the same reassurance of immortality. Of course, I'm talking decades from now, long after I'm gone to know whether or not I am correct.

By the way, I'm a big Sinatra fan. I've got more CDs of him than any other singer.
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Many younger people know Audrey Hepburn, especially women, because she is a fashion icon; i.e. the little black dress. So like the other icons mentioned (Wayne, Dean, Monroe, and Bogie), she will be remembered for more than her films.

 

As for Frank Sinatra: I think he will be one of the most remembered entertainers of the 20th century. More so for his music than films but Elvis, The Beatles and Frank will be the primary music of the 20th century that are known by future generations because of factors other than just their music.

 

 

 

 

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I'm 28, and you wouldn't believe how many people I know in my age group who either don't know Bogart, or have heard of him but couldn't pick him out of a police lineup.

 

I feel most people know Audrey Hepburn, because every store I go to has some merchandise with her face on it. Much like Marilyn in that sense.

 

Sinatra is someone everyone knows, but curiously, most people don't seem to realize that he was a great movie star. They just assume he was a singer who also happened to make films, kind of like Elvis. The fact that he made a lot of top notch films (unlike Elvis) and gave some terrific performances is basically unknown.

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}The only actresses from the '30s and '40s whose names still register with the general public are Garbo, Davis, Hepburn, and maybe Crawford and Ginger.

The main reason why they even register are because of pop culture references that actually poke fun at info from their personal life or an infamous role. I don't know how popular Garbo may be but I'm sure most would just misquote her wanting to be left alone. Crawford is remembered for wire hangers before anything else. And Audrey is more remembered than Katharine and it is for her Holly Golightly role and the fashions that came along with it than anything else. Ginger Rogers? I don't think she regusters with the public today. Maybe in the 80s, but not today.

 

The other woman that registers, is often misquoted, yet is idolized is Marilyn Monroe. Young women love memorabilia with her likeness on it. I don't know if some have seen or can even name 5 of her films though.

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LoveForNoir makes some very solid points and yes, my guess would be that Audrey is a little more known than Kate because of Audrey's fashion connection. Audrey also has a big gay following because of her tie to fashion (e.g. I have had some young fashion designers ask to use some of my Audrey photos to help them in their designs).

 

To me fashion has a stronger link back to the past then music or movies to younger generations. With music or movies younger people typically like what is 'pop'. While this is also true with fashion there is a strong pull for classic fashion and the reinvention of classic fashion into what is currently hip, from fashion designers. Thus the industry itself promotes classic fashion. We don't see this with music or movies since the current sellers of these products do NOT wish you to buy 'old' stuff but their stuff. This keeps fashion icons like Audrey in the limelight.

 

Kate is still very well known (as for as classic actresses) since she had such a long career but even this will die down as time passes on. While, someone like Monroe will continue to be pushed on generation after generation (for reasons that I don't agree with but understand).

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