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The Best Location Movie


slaytonf
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And I mean entirely on location. No sets. I know everyone will automatically think Naked City, but that's not it. Later tonight (and for you Easties, tomorrow morning) the best location movie ever made will air. Panic in the Streets stars Richard Widmark, Paul Douglass, Zero Mostel, Jack Palance, and Barbara Bel Geddes Directed by Elia Kazan. For capturing the grit, the grime, the slime, and the beer, no other movie comes close. It also does better than any other in using local talent for small roles. Better is not to say great. The results are inconsistent and show the inadvisability of the practice.

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"Prancer" (1989) was shot in 3 Oaks, Michigan. I really like that small town and the country side they picked for the movie's location. I wouldn't mind living there. :)

 

I'm a bit stunned that this movie doesn't get discussed. I think its a very nice, charming Christmas movie. Has near perfect casting and a surreal music score in spots. For modern Xmas movies, this ranks 2nd from "A Christmas Story" (1983).

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>For capturing the grit, the grime, the slime, and the beer, no other movie comes close.

 

Yep, you are right. I lived there for several years, not too long after the film was made. A sleazy dirty hot sweaty city with a lot of low-class sleazy people living and working in it. I was one of them. :)

 

That was back in the days of no air conditioners, and everything was in black and white.

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Some others come to mind.

 

*The Unforgiven* (1960), directed by John Huston, not to be confused with Clint Eastwood's 1990s movie with a similar title. Filmed in the area around Durango, Mexico. Desert vistas, distant mountains, good use of low-angle shots to show off the pale blue, cloud-dappled sky.

 

*The Law and Jake Wade* (1958) In California Lone Pine area. Made use of an existing Gold Rush ghost town. Very impressive mountain scenery, well-used.

 

...and there's always *Jeremiah Johnson*, filmed mostly in a State Park in Utah. 'nuf said.

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{font:Arial}This is a tough category for most of the famous, Hollywood major films. Very few were filmed outside of a studio soundstage or back lot. Even if there was on location filming, like “Miracle On {font}{font:Arial}34^th^ Street{font}{font:Arial},” or “On The Town,” it was somewhat limited. And, many films made overseas won’t really count, because here too the use of a studio soundstage was routine; in whatever country the production company decided to shoot the movie. As for my choice for this category, I would go with the 1954 western, “Vera Cruz.” This movie was entirely shot in {font}{font:Arial}Mexico{font}{font:Arial}. Also for some consideration might be the 1951 MGM western, “Westward The Women.” As far as I can tell, John Ford’s “Wagon Master” was mostly shot outdoors, but some sets were utilized back at the RKO studios.{font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}A good example of attempting what I call “juggle a film around with its look,” or to even fool an audience about the authenticity of a movie shot outdoors was with the MGM 1946 classic, “The Yearling.” It’s pretty easy in this movie to see the difference from what standing-sets there are and then what’s obviously been shot outdoors and away from the soundstage. I often wondered about Billy Wilder’s ill-fated 1951 drama, “Ace in The Hole” that was mostly shot out in the desert and what if any scene might have been shot in the soundstages back at {font}{font:Arial}Paramount{font}{font:Arial}. So, as previously mentioned, this is a tough subject to tackle and perhaps get a lid on what production team years ago, might have sacrificed the comfortable, easy environment of a studio soundstage for what reality had to offer. Today, most movies are shot on location, at a real place! Things sure have changed. {font}

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>writes MovieProfessor:

> I would go with the 1954 western, ?Vera Cruz.? This movie was entirely shot in Mexico. Also for some consideration might be the 1951 MGM western, ?Westward The Women.?

 

Normally, if I bring up a subject, I'm interested in seeing how posters expand the theme beyond the original post. But on this one, I mean what I say. Entirely on location. No sets. I'm not sure if there wasn't anything built for Vera Cruz. And there were several scenes in Westward the Women (a film I rate as one of the best Westerns, btw) which had sets. The Yearling has some great location shooting, but also has a lot of studio work.

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Of course the list wouldn't be complete without the very first movie shot on location - Roman Holiday. But for my money give me anything shot in Monument Valley since I have actually been there and even the best westerns don't do it justice!

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How about a film in which its budget is so small, the producer couldn't afford movie sets.

 

"Alien Factor" (1976) shot entirely in the woods just outside of Baltimore. The director/writer Don Dohler is from Baltimore.

 

The total budget was $3,500.00

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> How about a film in which its budget is so small, the producer couldn't afford movie sets.

> "Alien Factor" (1976) shot entirely in the woods just outside of Baltimore. The director/writer Don Dohler is from Baltimore.

 

I believe that was also the situation of *The Blair Witch Project* (1999).

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I have wondered what is done for movies set in movie studios. I am thinking in particular of *The Falcon in Hollywood* (1944).

 

Did they create a set of a sound stage within a sound stage?

Did they shoot the exteriors of sound stages on a back lot?

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>I'm not talking about films that have scenes shot on location. I'm talking about films with no built sets at all.

 

Why don't you give us a list of each and every location film that was made entirely on location, with no sets at all, and we will tell you which ones were the best.

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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote}Summertime (shot in Venice)

Good pick here, Charlotte.

 

My wife and I had visited picturesque Venice in the early '90s, and just a few years later I remember my very first viewing of *Summertime* on TCM, and I remember how David Lean's movie transported me back to that wonderous city on the Adriatic. And since then, I've had the feeling Mr. Lean captured the essence of a particular place and a particular time as well as anyone ever has in a film.

 

(...and for the folks around here who aren't Kate Hepburn fans, I defy you to watch that film and not have that lady's performance break your heart at the end)

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> {quote:title=slaytonf wrote:}{quote}I'm not talking about films that have scenes shot on location. I'm talking about films with no built sets at all. There were sets built for Roman Holiday, great as Rome was made use of in the film.

Films I've previously mentioned:

 

*Jeremiah Johnson* -- A warm, tight cabin built in snowbound country.

 

*The Unforgiven* -- The sodhouse with cattle grazing on top, and another settler's home viewed only from the outside.

 

Do these structures disqualify these films, by your standards?

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> {quote:title=slaytonf wrote:}{quote}I'm not talking about films that have scenes shot on location. I'm talking about films with no built sets at all. There were sets built for Roman Holiday, great as Rome was made use of in the film.

If the art direction is good, then we (the audience) don't know which scene is a set & which scene is an actual location. Be that as it may, I always loved AMADEUS. More than any other film I can think of, it really seemed to put you in that time & place (Austria, circa 1700's).

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