Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

***ASK MONGO***


Recommended Posts

Mongo--After the movie the other night with Virginia Weidler (the one where she belongs to some club that collects movie stars autographs) Robert Osborne made it sound like she died mysteriously and that her family never wished to discuss it. I think I'd forgotten it was due to heart disease, but it's strange about her family. Although I guess I wouldn't want curiousity seekers bothering me either if I didn't have anything to do with what she did. Anyway, you never fail to amaze me with the info you come up with and I love this thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mongo and Feaito,

 

About your inquiry re Lana Turner's photograph:

There was a photographer at MGM in the 50's whom I knew called Eric Carpenter. He was Lana's favourite photographer and had taken many portraits of her in the 40's also.

Just a hint, but maybe he took the picture you're both thinking about?????

 

Larry

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brackenhe, many thanks for the kind words.

 

In the film "The Youngest Profession" where Virginia Weidler was an autograph hound, she co-starred with Jean Porter, who played her pal. They remained life-long friends in real life.

In an article in Classic Images magazine Miss Porter who is still living, said that Virginia was a very private person and chose not to discuss her early years in the movies. She also spoke of Virgnia's battle with heart disese which was very trying for her family.

After she died, her family was most likely carrying out her wishes of privacy.

 

Mongo

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mongo!

 

What do you think the chances of finding a copy (any quality or number of reels) of "Convention City are?"

 

Also, do you think "London at Midnight" exists? I don't mean the TCM still picture movie, but the real thing.

 

Do you think the "hype" surrounding these two movies makes the greater than they probably are/were?

 

Thanks! I'd love to hear your thoughts on this.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mongo,

 

Thanks for continuing the research on my inquiry about Lana's "Glamour Still"

 

and

 

Larry,

 

Thanks for the tip, it well may have been Eric Carpenter.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It's my pleasure Feaito and welcome back to the boards.

 

Thanks for the lead Larry. After some research I discovered that photographer Eric Carpenter was also a favorite of Norma Shearer. He is also famous for his candids of the stars, which are delightful.

I have yet to come across his association with Lana Turner regarding that one glamour shot, although I won't give up.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the welcome Mongo.

 

I did not know that Eric Carpenter was also a fave of Norma Shearer; I only knew that she had brought George Hurrell to MGM in 1930, whom she met thanks to Ramon Novarro. I had wondered who was her favourite photographer after Hurrell's departure from MGM. Thanks for the info!

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Alix regarding Lost Films:

 

Sorry to say that your chances of seeing the 1933 pre-code film "Convention City" are slim to none...but.

At the time the Joan Blondell movie was considered "too hot to be shown" and there were many complaints lodged against it.

In 1943 it was noted that Jack L. Warner ordered all prints plus the negative burned. However due to the controversy, word is that a few of the prints were smuggled off the Warner Brothers lot, giving hope that one day the movie will surface again.

 

It looks like there is no hope at all for Tod Browning's lost silent film "London After Midnight" (1927) starring Lon Chaney.

The movie existed up to the mid 1950s and was stored in the MGM vault #7. In the 1960s it is noted that a fire in vault #7 destroyed the last surviving print of the movie.

However, miracles were known to happen and one day perhaps one or both of these gems may show up in someone's attic...hopefully.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mongo,

 

I remember coming across a posting that delineated the sources of TCM's library, but can't find it again. Could you help please? Was one of the sources 'The Selznick Studio'? I'm interested in seeing 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1938), and wondered if it's likely to show up on TCM?

 

Thank you for any help.

 

Dianne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dianne, I believe it should be 'The Selznick Studio' since he produced the film "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" in 1938.

I also usually rely on the TCM library and the movie isn't scheduled, at least in the next 3 months, although I believe that TCM aired it in the past. I've seen it and it is true to the book and beautifully filmed in color.

I'll be on the look out for it, as myself want to see it again.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Mongo,

 

You deserve an Academy Award for all the great information you've provided for us! I spent the better part of 2 hours catching up and especially enjoyed your posts relating to MARNI NIXON, C. AUBREY SMITH and FAY BAINTER.

 

Would love to know about: MILIZA KORUS - star of the GREAT WALTZ. Known as the "Girl with the Tin Whistle Voice" and supposedly the only female singer that made Jeanette MacDonald nervous (or so I heard). I heard that she had made a film in Mexico (or maybe Cuba) - and that she'd also been in a car accident. Can you provide any clarification?

 

My other favorite is JEAN PARKER - what happened to her after her last film? I know she currently resides in the Motion Picture Country Home. She was so likeable -- but didn't seem to "hit it bigtime" in Tinseltown.

 

Thanks again for your efforts!

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Erzet regarding Miliza Korjus:

 

The 'Berlin Nightingale' was born in Warsaw, Poland of Swedish descent.

Her mother and father separated during WWI and in 1918 she moved to Kiev with her mother and sisters and received her musical education.

While still in her teens, she joined the Dumka Chorus in Kiev and toured the Soviet Union.

 

In 1927, she joined her father and brother. Under her father's guidance (he played the violin and greatly admired opera). She began making concert appearances in the Baltic states.

 

In 1929 she married a physicist and moved to Germany. She continued her concert career there and in 1933 was engaged by the Berlin State Opera. Her operatic appearances and recordings quickly propelled her to the forefront of European singers.

 

Her records were heard by Irving Thalberg of MGM who signed her sight unseen to a 10 year film contract.

She arrived in Hollywood in March of 1936, however Thalberg's untimely death in September of that year delayed production of her first film, and it was not until May of 1938 that she started work on "The Great Waltz". The film was well received and best of all, she was nominated for an Academy Award in a supporting role, one of the few singers of the period to be so honored.

 

In 1940, she was set to co-star in MGMs "Guns and Fiddles" with Robert Taylor and Hedy Lamarr, about a kind of Hungarian Robin Hood.

On May 28, 1940, just two weeks before production, she was seriously injured in an auto accident. Her left leg was so badly crushed that the doctors at first considered amputation. However, after several months in the hospital, she underwent numerous operations and bone grafts, she did recover use of the leg.

 

By the Summer of 1941 she had sufficiently recovered to undertake a concert tour of South America. It was the start of WWII that she decided to remain in Mexico, where she made what would be her final film "Imperial Chivalry".

 

She returned to the U.S. in 1944 to appear at Carnegie Hall. Eventually, she settled in Los Angeles and made concert appearances throughout North America. In 1952 she married once again, to a physician, and retired from the stage instead to make recordings.

 

Miliza Korjus remained a bright fixture in southern California society and was greatly admired and sought out by visiting artists such as divas Joan Sutherland and Beverly Sills.

 

The Berlin Nightingale passed away of heart failure at age 71 in 1980.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was prepared for bad news--and not surprised.

 

I figured that both films were lost causes, and as nitrite film decomposes, the chances move from "slim" to "none."

 

I've been away from the boards for a long time, but I enjoyed reading your "Ask Mongo" column. You know a lot and it's nice to share what you know with the rest of us. Take care.

 

Alix

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Erzbet regarding Jean Parker:

 

The petite blonde from Montana was born Lois Mae Green. Her father was, a well-known gunsmith and hunter, her mother, one of eighteen children of a pioneer family.

 

During the Great Depression, when her mom and dad were unable to find work, Jean was 'adopted' by a family in Pasadena, California during her formative years. An accomplished gymnast before being discovered by Louis B. Mayer's personal assistant, she went with the flow and became an actress.

 

Of her 70 films, several were top notch including the original "Little Women" with Katharine Hepburn (Jean is the only surviving member of the key cast). She also was in "The Ghost Goes West", "Lady for a Day", "The Texas Rangers", "The Flying Deuces" with Laurel and Hardy, "Bluebeard" good suspense with John Carradine, "The Gunfighte" with Peck, "Black Tuesday", etc. Although for a time, she was the Queen of MGM 'B' films.

 

During WWII and after several successful trips cross country entertaining injured servicemen, she lost her flying service in Palm Springs.

Eventually she moved to New York, where she hit Broadway and starred in some plays including "Born Yesterday", filling in for Judy Holliday. She also appeared on TV programs.

 

Jean Parker was married 4 times including to actor Robert Lowery by whom she has a son.

 

In the 1960s and 1970s she worked as an acting coach. By the 1980s she was a recluse, accepting few visitors outside of her son Robert, who has twin girls.

 

Jean is now close to 90 years old and lives at the Motion Picture Country Home in Woodland Hills, California.

 

Jean Parker has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Mongo

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

erzbet, I'm not so certain about a book, especially since Jean Parker became a very private person in later years. Perhaps one day her son just might pen his moms

memoirs, which would be nice.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mongo, I want to change the topic here a little. Last night I was surfing around on a very well-done silent film website. Under their FAQs, it said that there were a few child stars from the 20's still alive but that was all. I immediately emailed them that Anita Page (Our Dancing Daughters) was still alive and appearing in films! Do you know of any other adult film stars from the silent era still alive? I know most would be in their mid 90's by now, but I was curious.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alix, needless to say, there aren't that many former silent screen stars with us today, especially with the celebrity of Anita Page.

Of course we still have Mickey Rooney and June Havoc, who was in a film with Harold Lloyd, and also Fay McKenzie.

Then we have Jackie Cooper and other members of the silent Our Gang comedies including Dickie Moore, Jean Darling and Mildred Kornman.

I would imagine that there are less known actors of the silent screen still alive and like you say, well into their 90's.

 

Mongo

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mongo

Could you give any information on Estelle Taylor she was in the movie Street Scene 1931 she played Sylvia sydney's mom in the film. I think she was in the Carole

Lombard & Gary Grant film "To Each his Own" as Carole's

sister in the movie but i'm not sure?...lolite.

thanks Mongo for any information and thanks in advance for taking the time to search...:).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...