Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

***ASK MONGO***


Recommended Posts

Hi Mongo,

 

Thanks once again for your information and that web site. That will help me out tremendously and I will let you all know what my final list of 'ommittees' is before I go to California. I know you all wish me luck with the unobservant, uncommitted, disinterested coots in Hollywood, but I may have to hit them over the head with a barge pole to get any success. Oh, if only we were all on the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, what we could accomplish!!!!!

 

Glad to her that Una merkel made it 'onto the streets' so to speak, but will campaign for Miss Treen definitely.

 

Regards,

Larry

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi mongo! Larry's quest to get stars on the walk of fame for some of our forgotten stars has brought up some memories of a trip that my family took to Los Angeles back in the 1970's when I was in grade school.

 

Thanks to my mother, I was aware of some of the classic stars like Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney, and Shirley Temple and I had a good time trying to find their stars. But I remember that I came across several stars for Tony Martin--I think that he has stars for film and radio--and I had no idea who he was. Of course, I know who he is now, but could you provide some info about him? I've seen him in TWO TICKETS TO BROADWAY and that's about all I know about him. And how many stars does he have on the walk of fame?

 

thanks! I really enjoy this thread.

 

Sandy K

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Sandy regarding Tony Martin:

 

Surprisingly, Tony Martin has 4 stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for Motion Pictures, Recording, radio and Television. Gene Autry has the most with the complete 5 stars that are allowed.

 

Mr. Martin was born Alvin Morris on Christmas Day in 1912. At age ten he received a soprano saxophone as a gift from his grandmother. In his grammar school glee club, he became an instrumentalist and a boy soprano singer. He found his first band, named The Red Peppers, when he was only a high schooler, eventually joining the band of a local orchestra.

 

In the mid-1930s, he left the band to go to Hollywood to try his luck in films. It was at that time that he adopted the stage name, Tony Martin.

He was a featured vocalist on the George Burns and Gracie Allen radio program. In the movies, he had a number of bit parts, including a role as a sailor in "Follow the Fleet" with Astaire and Rogers.

 

He eventually signed a contract with 20th Century-Fox and then MGM in which he starred in a number of musicals, including "Ziegfeld Girl", "The Big Store", "Till the Clouds Roll by", "Two Tickets to Broadway", "Easy to Love", "Hit the Deck", etc.

He also made a number of hit records for the Decca label.

 

In World War II, he joined the Navy, but as a result of rumors (without any factual basis) that he had gotten an Officer's commission through bribery, he left the Navy and joined the Army Air Corps. Though he had an outstanding record in the military, the rumors hurt his professionsl reputation and the major record labels refused to sign him.

 

He would later manage to sign up with Mercury and RCA records, belting out such hits as "I Get Ideas", "To Each His Own", "There's No Tomorrow" his biggest hit, was sung to the tune of "O Sole Mio", which Elvis recored as "It's Now or Never". He also scored with "La Vie En Rose" and "Kiss of Fire".

 

In 1937 he married lovely Alice Faye, which lasted for 4 years, divorcing in 1941. He married Cyd Charisse in 1948 and produced 2 sons, and the marriage has remained durable (57 years).

In the 1960 he and Cyd toured the country with a nightclub act entertaining at cabarets.

 

At age 92 he is still going strong, making appearances at Nostalgia events.

 

Mongo

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Addition:

 

I must say that Tony Martin's movie career was just adequate. He scored better on the radio and on TV, where he had his own show in the 1950s.

He did his best as a crooner, selling millions of records, with his magificent voice.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mongo. Do you recall if TCM showed the restored version of A Star Is Born (1954) with the audio commentary by Ron Haver about two years ago? I recently purchased the DVD and was disappointed that the extras did not include the audio commentary. I don't know if it's available for purchase, but I'm sure I saw it on TCM.

 

Thanks for all your wonderful contributions!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It just occurred to me that I didn't thank you for the info on Pat O'Brien. I guess since his comtemporaries such as Spencer Tracy & James Cagney were still playing the lead role, I thought that maybe Pat wasn't quite as popular when he reached middle age. But I guess I shouldn't compare everyone to two of the greatest actors that ever graced the screen. But thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It was my pleasure, Helen. It was also nice to know that Pat O'Brien capped off his career by co-starring with pal James Cagney in the movie "Ragtime".

A few of my favorite Pat O' Brien films are "Angels with Dirty Faces", "Til We Meet Again" and "Fighting Father Dunne".

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Mongo,

 

I have had little luck finding info about htis but you are "the one" when it comes to finding the answers to the hardest questions, so here goes:

 

Information on the Turner Archive Project. Who's been interviewed? How do they decide who gets interviewed in any given year? Who does the interviewing?

 

The TAP intriques me to no end so I am hoping you can help!

 

Thank you,

lynn in sherman oaks

Link to post
Share on other sites

cowbtony, it seems to me that I do recall watching the restored version of "A Star Is Born" with audio commentary by the late film historian Ron Haver. I can't think of any other place that I've might have seen it except for TCM.

It's sad that his commentary is not included on the DVD since it was his passion for the restoration of "A Star Is Born" and to be shown in all it's glory in 1983.

I'm just wondering if his commentary did make in on earlier

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lynn, I haven't had much luck researching the Turner Archive Project either.

 

I would imagine that they contact as many stars as possible to interview since most of them appear in the films in their vast library, and can comment on the making of the movie, to relate to a future showing.

 

Most of these 'bits' are used in TCMs "Word of Mouth" segments, which includs Anne Francis, Van Johnson, Teresa Wright, Tony Martin, June Allyson, Janis Paige, Cyd Charisse, Juanita Moore, Mickey Rooney, Gloria DeHaven, etc.

 

Of course there are those stars that don't wish to participate anymore. I would imagine that Doris Day was approached a number of times.

 

I don't recall seeing any 'new' spots with the stars lately except for Charles Lane when he turned 100 years old.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

cowbtony,

 

Ron Haver was a great guy. His tenure at the LA County Museum of Art was a glorious time for their film programming.

 

I dont' know if everyone knows this regarding "A Star is Born"-

 

Cukor was involved with the restoration. It was one of Ron Haver's and Fay Kanin's dreams to be able to show the restored version of "Star" to Mr. Cukor.

 

When work was completed, they called and arranged for Mr. Cukor to come see the restored version prior to the big, public unveiling.

 

Unfortunately, Mr. Cukor died the night before his screening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

cowbtony,

 

Ron Haver was a great guy. His tenure at the LA County Museum of Art was a glorious time for their film programming.

 

I dont' know if everyone knows this regarding "A Star is Born"-

 

Cukor was involved with the restoration. It was one of Ron Haver's and Fay Kanin's dreams to be able to show the restored version of "Star" to Mr. Cukor.

 

When work was completed, they called and arranged for Mr. Cukor to come see the restored version prior to the big, public unveiling.

 

Unfortunately, Mr. Cukor died the night before his screening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

cowbtony,

 

Ron Haver was a great guy. His tenure at the LA County Museum of Art was a glorious time for their film programming.

 

I dont' know if everyone knows this regarding "A Star is Born"-

 

Cukor was involved with the restoration. It was one of Ron Haver's and Fay Kanin's dreams to be able to show the restored version of "Star" to Mr. Cukor.

 

When work was completed, they called and arranged for Mr. Cukor to come see the restored version prior to the big, public unveiling.

 

Unfortunately, Mr. Cukor died the night before his screening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lynn, I haven't had much luck researching the Turner Archive Project either.>>

 

Mongo,

 

See me be sad. :(

 

I had hoped if anyone could track down info it would be you. It is one of the best kept secrets in town that's for sure.

 

I only found out about it reading an interview with George Feltenstein of Warner Bros on the Digital Bits website.

 

Only place I have ever seen it mentioned, I think.

 

Oh well, I guess the most important thing to keep in mind is that they are preserving the history for future generations and that's very okay in my book.

 

Thanks again. (Hopefully this one will only post once)

 

lynn in sherman oaks

www.classiclasvegas.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi mongo,

I was watching a sherlock holmes movie on movie flix .com "The Women in Green" Hillary Brooke

was in the film i know she was in several sherlock holmes

movies with Basil Rathbone. She was beautiful and had an

English accent in all her movies. I don't know a thing

about her but i'm sure you could do a detailed bio of her for me! thanks mongo in advance :) lolite.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Lolite regarding Hillary Brooke:

 

She was a tall, classy blonde who shimmered with intelligence and style. The word "tall" meant that she couldn't be cast in virginal roles opposite male stars of the 1930's, 40's and 50's, but she could be vixens, vamps and villains, all of which she played with a twinkle in her eyes.

 

Hillary Brooke, spoke with an English accent although she wasn't British. She felt it was a smart way to differ from other blonde starlets of the era, and she was right.

She was born Beatrice Peterson in 1914, in Astoria, New York.

 

Although she was basically dealt the same cards in over seventy films between 1937 and 1957, she played them with a disconcerting blend of grace and venom. She made good movies look even more sumptuous and intriguing and she gave her own special menace and allure to low-budget programmers, especially in the way she entraps Alex Nicol in "Heat Wave", and the way she confuses an already baffled Ray Milland in "Ministry of Fear", while wearing a slinky gown, with a rapid succession of distracting gestures, a cool soothing voice, and a pair of hipnotic eyes. And most always up to no good as in "Jane Eyre" or the title role in "The Woman In Green", a Sherlock Holmes mystery with Basil Rathbone.

 

She would later settle into television co-starring opposite Abbott and Costello, who she was so at ease working with. She would also lend support to Gale Storm and Charles Farrell on "My Little Margie".

 

The beautiful Hillary Brooke was married twice and had two children. She passed away in 1999 at age 84.

 

She is remembered with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Mongo

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

I particularly remember Hillary Brooke as 'Blanche' in "Jane Eyre" (1944). She was beautiful and bitchy and I think stole her scenes in the movie.

She has an entrance scene riding a horse side-saddle and she makes an impressive first sight, top hat and riding crop et al!!!!!!

 

Larry

Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks mongo,

Hillary Brooke was the sexest villain ,vamp in movies

her gowns her looks! Just magnificent I could've sworn

she was British! Astoria N.Y. well bowl me over!....lolite. p.s. Larry Hillary made quite an entance

in that movie i agree! thanks again mongo this thread is

one of my favorites you do an outstanding job!......

Link to post
Share on other sites

To Gypsy regarding Donald Meek:

 

No other actor has ever had so apt a name. For in his screen persona, meek is precisely what he was. Donald Meek portrayed timidly, respectable little men who were worried, confused and ineffectual.

 

With a quavery and bleating voice emerging from his thin mouth, and with chubby cheeks, a small nose and blinky eyes, he had a monopoly on the role of the nervous little man who is the victim of fate or adversity. The fact that he stood five feet, four inches tall and weighed 130 pounds didn't detract from that image.

 

Ironically, off-screen the bald comic was forceful and erudite, a strong, determined man who served in two wars and had been a professional acrobat.

 

Meek was born July 14, 1878, in Glasgow, Scotland, the son of an artist. He acted professionally even as a child. At 14 he came to the United States as the "top man" in an acrobatic troupe, but a fall from the high wire in which he broke both legs turned him back to the stage.

 

He served with the U.S. Army in Cuba during the Spanish-American war, and contracted tropical fever, which caused him to lose most of his hair.

Becoming a character actor at age 18, he joined a Stock Company in Boston, during which time he married Belle Walken in 1909. In 1913 h3 made his Broadway debut in a musical.

 

The actor tried to enlist in the Army again when World War I broke out, but was turned down, so he served in the Canadian Army instead.

He eventually returned to Broadway to begin a long career in the theater acting in numerous plays including "Broken Dishes" in 1929 in which Bette Davis played his daughter. During the play's run Meek lost his life's savings in the Wall Street Crash.

 

As talkies took over the screen, he was called to Hollywood and eventually make over 130 films, including "The Merry Widow", "The Whole Town's Talking", "The Informer", "Mark of the Vampire", "Captain Blood", "Top hat", "Kind Lady", "Pennies from Heaven", "You Can't Take It with You", "Stagecoach" was perhaps his most famous role, "Jesse James", "Young Mr. Lincoln", "My Little Chickadee", "A Woman's Face", "Tortilla Flat", "The Thin Man Goes Home", and so many more.

 

His last film was "Magic Town" with James Stewart and by the time it was released Donald Meek died at the age of 68, in the fall of 1946.

He was unique, he was inimitable, and he is one of the most instantly recognizable faces to appearon the screen in Hollywood's Golden Era.

 

The talented little fella has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Notice:

 

I'll be away from the boards for 5 days beginning tomorrow. Don't hesitate to post any questions you may have regarding movies and movie stars as I will make a great attempt to answer them when I return.

Have a nice weekend.

 

Thanks.

 

Mongo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...