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***ASK MONGO***


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Gigi, I can tell you that there are friends of mine that obtained DVDs from the UK and were happy with the quality.

However since member Edgecliff read that Paramount has the rights to "The African Queen", perhaps you may want to hold off, since its apparent that the studio will eventually release the movie on DVD and most likely with extras.

Since Lauren Bacall was on location with Hepburn and Bogart she may comment on the experience.

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Thanks Mongo.......

 

I will hold off!!!! I'd love to get one with "extra's". I am collecting all the Bogey movies!!! He was one of my favorites. Hopefully, it will be released soon, it's clear there are many of us who'd like it!!

 

Thanks again.

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Ralph, after some research I couldn't come up with the name of a 'companion' other than those ladies that you mentioned.

It was Hepburn's 'housekeeper' Norah Moore who received the most money (cash) that was left in her will. I would imagine after all the years that Miss Moore spent with Miss Hepburn, she is considered to be a 'companion' too.

 

The report on Smoking Gun indicates that Miss Moore received $200.000, yet the actual will indicates that she was to receive $100.000.

 

Mongo

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Hi Mongo,

 

When I was in LA last month, a TV station played "Spellbound" one afternoon and then "The Spiral Staircase" about 3 days later.

Both featured Rhonda Fleming in small roles.

 

Nobody ever hears about her anymore. Do you know what's happening with that beautiful redhead lately??

 

Thanks,

Larry

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Larry, the ravishing redhead Rhonda Fleming is well and still active at age 82.

She was married 6 times including to the late Ted Mann who was associated with the Chinese Theatre.

 

Miss Fleming is a philanthropist involved in many causes including Childhelp USA, Alzheimer Research, The Rhonda Fleming Mann Clinic for Women's Comprehensive Care at UCLA Medical Center associated with women's cancer, etc. Her belief is that caring, compassion, communication and commitment are essential to the healing process.

 

Last on screen in 1990, she has one son Kent Lane from her first marriage.

 

She is quite a lady, that Rhonda Fleming.

 

Mongo

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Thanks Mongo,

 

I'm glad to hear she's still alive. I asked the concierge at the Beverly Hills Hotel about her and he'd never heard of her. Sometimes these people pass away and there's no report on them if they're not currently famous.

 

When I first lived in LA, Rhonda was married to a doctor, so maybe that's why she's so interested in philanthropy in the medical field.

 

Thanks again,

Larry

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You have mixed up a number of different people .

 

It was Phyllis Willbourn who first worked for Constance Collier . Phyllis was a nurse and she was originally employed to help Constance who was a diabetic . Constance was one of the first people to be given insulin for her diabetes - she was literally hours away from death and the drug saved her life .

 

In 1955 Constance Collier died and Phyllis went to work for Katharine (they already knew other ) Phyllis was slightly older than Katharine and she continued to work for Katharine until her death in 1995 - she was over 90 when she died and she really didn't work any more but Katharine and Phyllis were great friends and so Katharine took care of her and considered her to be family . Apparently Phyllis had a beautiful apartment and lived reasonably well . She is buried with the Hepburn family as she had no family of her own .

 

Norah was Katharine's cook and housekeeper and worked for Katharine for many years . Katharine left her some money in her will .

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Constance Collier was not Katharine's companion - she was her acting coach and she didn't look after Katharine . They were good friends and apparently Constance was a bit of a mother figure to Katharine after her mother died suddenly .

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No problems .

 

Katharine was probably a difficult person to work for at times but she was enormously generous and loyal to those who worked for her and many people who worked for her became her best friends . Phyllis is mentioned in a number of books - apparently she had a reasonably good relationship with Spencer although he liked to tease her because of her british accent .

 

It was Katharine and Phyllis who went down to the funeral parlour in 1967 and drove the car behind Spencer on the way to the funeral - his own funeral cortage .

 

Katharine also had a guy who looked after her house in New York when was living in California - Charles he worked for her for over 40 years .

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Hi Smithus -

 

I've been away for a few days and just found your material on Katharine Hepburn - thanks for your help. I knew I had the ladies mixed up - and we haven't even mentioned Laura Harding.

 

I tend to be a little skeptical (no, a lot skeptical) of autobiographies; they are too often just self-serving and ego-stroking. I remember reading Bette Davis and Tallulah Bankhead autobiographies years ago and enjoying them a lot - only to find that neither had written hers (and there was very little truth in either book). Still, they were fun to read and not to be taken too seriously. But for the whole story, I'd much rather read a good biography anytime.

 

So I got a good laugh when last month I picked up an old paperback copy (in Thailand!) of "Me" by Ms. Hepburn - of course it was called "Me;" I don't think there was really anyone else in her world. But I enjoyed it; she was a good actress with a gargantuan ego and personality. I just never put much credence in what she said (I know I am in the minority here - many people think she could walk on water).

 

Have you seen the recently published biography, "Katharine Hepburn: An Untold Story?" Certainly, it's a diferent take on the woman - and not for her fans. But there lots of biographies out there by people who idolized her.

 

Again, thanks for the information.

 

Ralph

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Ralph

 

I have read the new biography and I have a very poor opinion of it . Not because of the allegations but because its so poorly written and inaccurate .

 

I have access to a lot of material relating to Hepburn that the general public doesn't see and I have read widely and seen some pretty rare material on Katharine including her letters . It is true that its not possible to write a probing biography if you idolise someone but I was particularly surprised that the author didn't make use of newer material that has come out since Katharine's death .

 

A good example of poor research in most of the biographies is Katharine's husband Ludlow . He only gave one interview to the media and reading it makes you realize that he was not the idiot that most people have portrayed him as .

 

We wait in hope for a decent biography of Spencer as well

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Sounds like Mongo is the one to ask. I am searching for a reproduction-quality film still or production still from Adam's Rib. It was included in the TCM travelling exhibit "Lights Camera Classics". It's the one with Tracy, Holliday, and Hepburn seated in court with the courtroom spectators behind them. I have registered with Photofest so I can search their collection, but I believe a colleague of mine already searched there and came up empty-handed. I have also written to MGM and TCM both, but I do not hold much hope of hearing from them anytime soon. This is to be used (I hope) on the cover of a forthcoming book about women and law films.

 

http://www.lightscameraclassics.com/Adam.html

 

The MGM Library of Film Scripts book for Adam's Rib, published by Viking in 1972, has some nice stills, but not this one. I might also be interested in other good courtroom stills from this film.

 

Can anyone help?

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Arb, I think your in luck. Go to filmposters.com and enter "Adams Rib" in search by title.

Numerous lobby cards will pop up from the film including the one you want. It' s in color and mint condition. You can click to enlarge and blow up a copy for the cover of the book. Good luck.

 

Mongo

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Thanks Mongo. That's a terrific resource. Unfortunately a jpeg of that size will not hold up to high-resolution printing, so I'd need to buy it in order to get a good scan. That's a possibility here, btu I'd prefer an image without the ad in the corner. That makes it harder to use. So I am still hoping that one of your fellow forum posters can point me toward another source for these images, or, if I am very very lucky, might have one in their own collection.

 

Many thanks, amy

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  • 4 weeks later...

Of course I might as well just ask now - so - -

What can you find out about an actor by the name of Albert Salmi/Salmai. He was a 60s actor mostly, I think but am not sure. He was in a couple of movies I've seen but was also in some really good Twilight Zone episodes. I think he was a way better actor than a lot of better known actors of the 60's - but then I thought the 60's sucked. But - I do like Salmai. Sorry I'm not sure on the spelling. But knowing you - you can find him. heheh Thanks bunches! :-)

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Hi Scarlett. It's good to see you bouncing around the boards again.

 

The underrated actor Albert Salmi was born in Brooklyn, New York. After serving in the Army during WWII he got into stage work and eventually hit Broadway.

 

He would go on to make about 40 films and his debut in "The Brothers Karamazov" was a knockout. He was offered an Oscar nomination for his role but he wasn't interested.

Other films included "The Bravados" with Gregory Peck, "Wild River", "The Outrage", "The Unforgiven", "Brubaker", etc. He favored westerns.

He also appeared on many TV shows including 3 episodes of "The Twilight Zone" titled "Execution", "A Quality of Mercy" and "Of Late I Think of Cliffordville", which was the most popular.

 

Mr. Salmi was known by friends and his peers to have a sense of humor and a lack of pretense.

He would marry actress Peggy Ann Garner ("A Tree Grows In Brooklyn") and would have a daughter. Unfortunately the marriage didn't last.

With his second wife he had 2 daughters. Sadly in 1990 after 25 years of marriage he and his wife were found dead, which was believed to be a murder-suicide (shot to death). He was 62 years old. It was noted that he depended on sleeping pills and was overcoming a bout with depression.

In 1995 his daughter with the late Peggy Ann Garner also passed away.

 

In any event Albert Salmi will be remembered as an outstanding character actor who took great pride in his craft.

 

Mongo

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To Ariel regarding Aline MacMahon:

 

Hollywood has never known how to deal properly with the great performers of the stage, especially actresses, as Aline MacMahon, who gave it a try in the movies, but found far greater rewards on Broadway.

In the early 1930s she was on the verge of becoming a film star but decided there was far less to be derived from playing Guy Kibbee's wife than from appearing in plays by O'Neill, Shakespeare and T.S. Eliot, and subsequently returned to the screen only rarely.

 

Movie critics raved over her though, calling her "one of the screen's few perfect actresses". She was in fact unique, a sad-faced, soulful, gentle-mannered lady who portrayed touching and sympathetic women with real warmth.

 

Tall, dark-haired and distinguished-looking, with large heavy-lidded eyes, she had a face like a tragic mask. She could provide a blunt, earthy and practical note to a film, and there was a touch of melancholy in most of her roles. She could, however, handle comedy equally well, and dished up the wisecracks with facility.

 

Miss MacMahon was born May 3, 1899, in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, the daughter of a telegraph operator who, sources say, became editor in chief; she was raised in New York City. After graduation from Barnard college there, she made her stage debut at the Neighborhood Playhouse's "Grand Street Follies" which paved the way for a successful career in the theater,in which Noel Coward would described her as "astonishing, moving and beautiful".

 

While in a play in Los Angeles a Warners casting director spotted her and promptly offered her a contract. She made her screen debut as newspaper editor Edward G. Robinson's secretary in "Five Star Final" (1931). She got rave notices. Other films that followed were "Once in a Lifetime" from a successful play she starred in, "The Heart of New York" as a tenement cleaning woman, "The Mouthpiece" with Warren William, and as "Barrelhouse Betty' posing as a fake countess in the fine drama "One Way Passage" with Kay Francis.

 

Miss MacMahon was married in 1928 to a prominent New York architect, Clarence S. Stein whose works included that city's most famous synagogue. She had known him for 10 years. Her warner's contract stipulated that her filming be restricted to certain times of the year so she could live in New York with him. They had a son.

 

In Hollywood she scored with one of her best roles in "Gold Diggers of 1933" followed by "Heroes for Sale", "The Life of Jimmy Dolan" with Loretta Young, "The World Changes" as Paul Muni's mother, "Heat Lightning" perhaps her finest role opposite Ann Dvorak, and "Babbitt" etc.

Her last good part in years to come was in "Kind Lady" where she befriends con-artist Basil Rathbone. Also in "Ah, Wilderness" wooed by Wallace Beery, "Back Door to Heaven", "Out of the Fog" as Ida Lupino's shrewish mother, and the comedy "Tish" with Zasu Pitts and Marjorie Main.

In Oriental makeup, she was Walter Huston's wife in "Dragon Seed" for which she received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress.

She would have one last good role in "The Search" (1948) with Montgomery Clift.

 

Other roles included "Roseanna McCoy", "The Eddie Cantor Story", "The Man from Laramie", "The Madwoman of Chaillot" with Katharine Hepburn, "Cimarron", "Diamond head", "I Could Go On Singing" and her farewell to the screen as Aunt Hannah in "All the Way Home".

 

Widowed in 1974, she lived in Manhattan. As late as 1975 (when she was 76) she co-starred at Lincoln Center in a revival of a play.

In 1991 she died at age 92, one of the last survivors of Hollywood's Golden Era.

 

Unfortunately she does not have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Mongo

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thank you!!

 

i suspected that she was, first and foremost, a stage actress. she had such ease and great, great delivery. i also felt that she had been highly educated.

 

i've see many of her films, but it was watching "gold diggers" again that reminded me i knew very little about her. and, again, i was struck by how very classic and beautiful she was. like a modigliani model.

 

i'm very glad she lived to a good, old age. smart woman.

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Mongo - thanks so much for the info about Albert Salmi. I was especially glad to hear you describe him as 'underrated'. :-)

 

Actually, 'Of Late I Think of Cliffordsville' is my favorite Twilight Zone episode - and I'm fortunate enough to have them all. I really got to appreciate him because of TZ.

 

Great news about his offer of an Oscar nomination - I'm sure he deserved it. I will watch that movie, "The Brothers K. . . ", (it's a Yul Brenner movie I believe) as soon as I get the chance.. Very sad news about his/his wife's death. I was hoping maybe he was still around and I could contact him.

 

Scarlett

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To Feaito regarding Zeffie Tilbury:

 

After performing many, many years on-stage, talented, petite actress Zeffie Tilbury made her film bow in 1917.

 

Almost from the beginning of her movie career in her early 50s, Tilbury was typecast as grandmotherly types, be they lovable, spiteful, or diabolical.

After a few silent films she would appear in such movies as "Mystery of Edwin Drood" with Claude Rains, "Werewolf of London" as a boozing landlady, "Alice Adams", "The Gorgeous Hussy" with Joan Crawford, "After the Thin Man" as Aunt Lucy, "Public Hero No. 1" as a deaf barfly, "Desire" as the elegant, larcenous Aunt Olga, "Marie Antoinette", "The Story of Alexander Graham Bell", "The Earl of Chicago" with Robert Montgomery, etc.

 

Perhaps she is best remembered for her small but touching role as Grandma in "The Grapes of Wrath" and as Ma Lester in "Tobacco Road", both directed by John Ford.

Fans of "Our Gang" will remember Tilbury as the snappish hypochondriac who is regenerated by the presence of the kids in the 1936 comedy short "Second Childhood". It was one of the best in the series.

 

During the the 1930s Zeffie Tilbury was almost totally blind, a fact she successfully kept secret from the public so as not to generate curiosity or pity. She would be helped on the set by a friend and companion.

There is no info regarding her education or marital status.

 

Miss Tilbury retired in 1941 and passed away at age 87 in 1950.

 

Mongo

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