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***ASK MONGO***


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Mongo, can you type out a thread about the greatest actor of all time please. Of course that would be Robert Mitchum. Ok, maybe not the "greatest", but dont you agree this guy never got the credit he so badly deserved?

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Scarlett, I'm gonna have to get a another look at the Open All Night intro so I can recollect the movie scenes that are shown. I mentioned that the 'car turning it's lights off' was a clip from "The Wrong Man", a while ago (I forget which thread).

I'll eventually get back to you on this.

 

Bince, It'll be my pleasure to get a profile together on leading movie star Robert Mitchum, who has always been a favorite of mine especially in "The Sundowners".

 

Mongo

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Bince, regarding Robert Mitchum (1917-1997), I will forgo the usual profile and concentrate on some interesting quotes which I believe best describes the actor.

 

No doubt that Mitchum was the King of Film Noir with such films as

"Angel face", "Cape Fear", "Crossfire", "His Kind of Woman", "The Locket", "Macao", "Out of the Past", "The Racket", "Undercurrent", "When Strangers Marry" aka "Betrayed", "Where Danger Lives", "The Big Steal", etc.

 

Director David Lean:

"Mitchum can, simply by being there, make almost any other actor look like a hole in the screen."

 

Director Edward Dmytryk:

"On the surface he is irresponsible and vague and yes - wacky. Underneath he knows the score as few men in Hollywood do."

 

Actress Lizabeth Scott:

"I, too, am a devotee of Robert Mitchum. His persona always expresses wonderful individuality."

 

Director John Huston:

"He is a rarity among actors, hardworking, non complaining , amazingly perceptive, one of the most shockingly underrated stars in the business."

 

Director Fred Zinneman:

"He is one of the finest instinctive actors in the business, almost in the same class as Spencer Tracy."

 

Director of "Night of the Hunter" Charles Laughton:

"Bob is one of the best actors in the world. In addition he can imitate any accent there is...he has great talent. He'd make the best Macbeth of any actor living. All his tough talk is a blind you know. He's a literate, gracious, kind man, with wonderful manners, and he speaks beautifully - when he wants too. He's a very tender man and a very real gentleman. You know he's really terribly shy. I can tell you one thing : he won't thank you for destroying the image he has built up as a defense...He's one of my very favorite people in the whole world. I can't praise him too much."

 

Actor Vincent Price:

"He claims he doesn't care about acting, but he's an extraordinary actor. He's one of the group in Hollywood who are such extraordinary personalities that people forget they're marvelous actors."

 

Robert Mitchum:

"People can't make up their minds whether I'm the greatest actor in the world or the worst. Matter of fact neither can I. It's been said I underplay so much, I could have stayed home. But I must be good at my job. Or they wouldn't haul me around the world at these prices.

Essentially, I attribute my success to my skeleton, to my low voice, to my broken nose and to my Bulgarian warrior walk."

 

The outstanding and underrated actor Robert Mitchum was married for 55 years and had 3 children. Was quoted "I'm a poor husband and a good father".

He was voted #23 of the 50 Greatest Screen Legends by The American Film Institute.

Robert Mitchum died on July 1, 1997 at the age of 79.

 

An Oscar nominee, he has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Mongo

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Good research as always, mongo. It seems to me that Shirley MacLaine had some pretty interesting things to say (I wish I could remember) about Robert Mitchum (besides the fact that he was a "hunk") during her Private Screenings with Robert Osborne. They co-starred in Two for the Seasaw (1962), which I also saw on TCM.

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Sandy and Dysthymia, thanks so much for the answer. I have never seen A Fish Called Wanda, although it is on my 'to do' list..............and I have never seen Kevin Kline in a movie, I wouldn't know him if he walked in the room right now. *g* So, I guess I really, legitimately, did not know. Now I do, so thanks.

 

Scarlett

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Can anyone help me with an old movie i have been going crazy trying to recall who was in it as well as the name.........The story line is almost like Wuthering Heights except the when the female actress dies she comes back as her young daughter and the same actress plays duel roles..........and the male actor becomes intrested in her because she looks so much like the mother........I know that at the end the male actor dies in a room when he sees the woman he loved reflection in a window it is a very wonderful love story if anyone has the name of this i would be ever so grateful:).............Thank You!!!

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I saw a film with the same plot but it is not old, is the version of "Wuthering Heights" which stars Ralph Fiennes and Juliette Binoche. I haven't read the book so I don't know if this version is more faithful to the book than the 1939 Classic with Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon. In between there were other films, including made-for-TV and foreign, which were based upon that story.

 

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feaito

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I've been doing so good with asking questions.....thanks to all your wonderful help....so I'm gonna ask one more. Another movie I saw when I was about 11-12 (longer ago than I care to admit). It was a period piece and the man was in prison. He was in love with a lady and every night they would meet in his dreams......and it seemed more real than not real. I think one or both of them died in the end....and were together forever......but I can't be sure about that last assumption. All I remember vividly is them always meeting in his/their dreams, I think they had the same dream, well, actually, like I said, I think the dreams were more real than reality. Sorry I can't provide more than this, I know it's slim pickins. Any ideas? Thanks.

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Sorry to intrude again in your thread Mongo, but this film is one of my very favourites...Scarlett, the film you are talking about is the poetic, wonderful, unique "Peter Ibbetson" starring Gary Cooper and Ann Harding. It's a Paramount film from 1935, which rights are owned by Universal Pictures. It's available on DVD as part of "The Gary Cooper Collection" and the transfer is very good, IMHO.

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Beat me to it, feaito. After reading scarlett's post, I said to myself "I know that film", but I couldn't think of it (in part because I haven't written a review for it). So, I've been looking through my movielog hoping I'd read the title and know which film it was, but then decided to power search imdb.com, romance genre with the keyword "prison", to find it. Thanks to your recommendation, my friend, I saw this one last summer.

 

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path40a

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Feaito, your not intruding on this thread. In my initial post to begin this thead I invited all members to participate in the questions that would be asked.

I believe it's a lot more interesting since we could learn from each other. Your input is always appreciated.

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THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! that is the movie i just thought it was a diffrent movie because it wasn't like the orginal movie but that is the one i was speaking of you are the greatest!!!!! now i can stop thinking :) Nibiru&urantia THANKS!!!!!!!!

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Thanks so much feaito ..... and path, too. Y'all never let me down! I didn't know if I'd given enough information for anyone to ever get it, but I shouldn't have worried. I want to see this movie again, badly, so now I know what I'm looking for. This will be such fun. Thanks again.

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Dear Mongo,

 

I have a sort of etymological question that I must blush a little to ask, but I am truly most curious about this. Perhaps you or some of the older folks on this list might be able to give me a polite answer.

 

In the 1930s and '40s movies we are all so fond of, men and women will often use the phrase "making love" to describe their flirtations or courting. Though the same two words have come to denote the ultimate act of romantic affection in recent decades (I can't quite figure out exactly when), it is sometimes disconcerting to see an elegantly fully dressed woman ask a similarly dressed male, "Are you making love to me?"

 

Anyway, here is my question: What was the euphemism for sex back when this phrase had that less intense meaning? (I know "going to bed with" must have been around--I have seen a few movies that baited the Code by playing with that phrase.)

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Mongo,

 

Hope you don't mind my intrusion on your thread but, this is just too much of a coincidence.

 

Ayres,

 

Quote:

"...it is sometimes disconcerting to see an elegantly fully dressed woman ask a similarly dressed male, "Are you making love to me?"..."

 

Last night, I watched (for the sixth or seventh time) "Dodsworth". One scene was exactly as you describe except...the man does the talking.

 

Arnold Iselin says to Fran Dodsworth (paraphrasing), "My dear...I am making love to you...". Yes...man and woman dressed in formal clothes and distance between the two characters--measure in yards. I had to laugh!

 

Is that concept a 'time capsule' or, what?!

Rusty

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Yes. And Fred Astaire sings to Ginger Rogers at the end of the beautiful song, ?Night and Day":

 

And this torment won?t be through

'til you let me spend my life making love to you...

 

...which taken too literally, as one friend of mine pointed out, would be difficult even in these days of Viagra and the like.

 

; )

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Ayres, that is an interesting question. First of all I believe that the term 'making love' or 'make love' has been used since the talkies began. The other term you used 'going to bed' or any mention of a bed was meant to indicate love making, and was used in countless pre-codes.

 

Rusty posted the perfect example with the movie "Dodsworth" which coincided with the quote that you mentioned. How ironic.

Usually when two fully dressed individuals had and infatuation for each other on the screen I had the impression that they were undressing one another with their eyes hence "I'm making love to you".

 

Another favorite is when two fully dressed individuals are alone together, usually having a cocktail and she says "Would you be shocked if I put on something more comfortable?". That to me says it all, and without mentioning making love.

 

Of course there was no stopping Mae West. In "She Done Him Wrong" Cary Grant says "Do you mind if I get Personal" and West retorts "Hmmm, go right ahead, I don't mind if you got familiar".

 

One line that actually shocked even me was in the movie "Strangers May Kiss". Norma Shearer says "I'm in an ****, wallowing, and I love it!"

 

And Rusty, your welcome to participate on this thread anytime you want. You are not intruding, by any means.

And Ayres, I don't believe I'm as young as you think I am.

 

Mongo

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Also, an early term in pre-codes for ?doing it? was ?something happened?. You?ll hear this in an early Cagney movie regarding his brother and his grilfriend. Also in ?Rain?. Joan Crawford says it. Also in ?It Happened one Night.? That?s exactly what the title of that film means, and it did ?happen? on the last night shown in the film. This term seems to have gone out of style in films by the end of the ?30s.

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Mongo, do you know this movie? Or even if it exists. LOL

 

 

When I was about 10 years old, I saw a movie that I always thought was a Bette Davis movie, but have never seen it again. I thought I finally had found it in A Stolen Life, but alas, that wasn't it. Unless she made 3 movies in which she was identical twins, which is highly doubtful. Now I'm wondering if I imagined the whole thing. :-O There is A Stolen Life, the movie with Karl Malden, and this one that I can't find the name of. I doubt if she played sisters in that many movies so I don't who this could have possibly been.

 

 

I don't remember much about it other than the ending. There were identical twins, one was good and one was bad (of course). They were both in love with the same man, who was with the "good" girl. There was something about boats and water. (Hence, my connection with A Stolen Life). I think the bad girl was going to a shrink (or some kind of professional). Anyway, as near as I can remember, the bad girl had done something wrong (murder? I don't know). Anyway, her sister and a couple of other people, I think maybe the boyfriend/husband of the good girl, and a professional (doctor?) They let it be assumed that the good girl had drowned (I think it was drowned, died somehow) and the 2 guys went in to see the bad girl. I believe Bette was lying down on a couch or something. They told her her sister had died. Knowing that she wouldn't have to go to jail and would also get to keep the love interest, Bette pretended that it was the bad girl who drowned, not the good girl, and she was going to assume the identity of the good girl. After she made this decision, she sunk herself, because that proved "something". The good girl walks iinto the room and Bette realized what she had done. I sure hope I have this even partially right. Does anyone understand to what movie I am referring? I just keep looking for it, and never find it. I'd love to see it again, even though I don't remember much about it, it was a good movie. Thanks for your help, Mongo - and everyone.

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Scarlett, your movie could very well be "The Dark Mirror" (1946) in which Olivia de Havilland played twin sisters (of course one is good and one is disturbed). The

professional doctor is played by Lew Ayres (the doctor in "Johnny Belinda").

Ironically, the movie was released the same year as Bette Davis' "A Stolen Life".

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