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***ASK MONGO***


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Yes, Jack I had forgotten about her singing that song.....and then one of the twins was named Hallie. Thank you for the info about Sid. Do you know if he finished his book about Judy Garland? And if it was published? Gerald Clarke wrote in his credits that he appreciated Sid talking to him although he was working on his own book. Her last husband whose name eludes me Deans? was writing one also.

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And of course, Joanna Barnes, who played Brian Keith's girlfriend in the original, played the mother of the girlfriend in this remake...

 

I'm not aware a publishing of Sid Luft's book, and I'd have my eye out for something like that...

 

Mickey Deans was the name of Miss Garland's last husband. They were only married three months when she passed away...

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gwtwbooklover and Jack, I've enjoyed the banter regarding Sid Luft and Joey Luft, and must note that it is on the mark.

 

I can add that Lorna Luft has confirmed that her brother, 51 year old Joey Luft is indeed a photographer in California.

He is single, balding and chooses to avoid show business completely.

Like his sister, he has struggled with addiction and rumors of being gay.

 

Although the late Sid Luft was helpful in revitalizing Judy Garland's career he was also abusive to her. There was a time when Frank Sinatra was going to step in but Garland wouldn't allow it.

 

As far as "The Parent Trap" goes it is not uncommon in Hollywood for films to duplicate scenes from films of the Golden Age. Today's writers can't touch those of the past.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was cleaning my room and was watching Task Force with Gary Cooper and it started in Black and White and was for a long time and then when I look up(I was listening intently) it was in color! My ? is why? Robert didn't even comment on it at the end which I thought he would. When the technology improved for air craft carriers did they switch to color? What was the deal? Thanks in advance.

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Oh, it's just one in a long line of black-and-white/color hybrids that the studios made from time to time (THE WIZARD OF OZ, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, the silent KING OF KINGS, BEN-HUR). As with OZ, the switch to color was implemented both for dramatic reasons, and as an added inducement to get audiences into theaters.

 

The film is told in b&w flashback, as Cooper's character Jonathan Scott recalls his Navy career up to the climactic battles of World War II, and goes to color as the mature Scott, about to retire, concludes his reminiscences with his friend and superior, Pete Richard (Walter Brennan, in the last of six films made with Cooper).

 

I find mixing-and-matching color and b&w an uncomfortable match, but I admit that I can't look at it through the eyes of audiences from generations past.

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I thought this effect worked beautifully in Paul Shrader's film Mishima. The flashbacks were in black-and-white, the present day narrative was in "regular" color, the enactment of scenes from Mishima's writings were shot in vivid, glossy, saturated colors.

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GWTWbooklover, the movie "Task Force" (1949) was a lot more realistic than most 1940s war films. Director Delmar Daves made good use of actual combat footage both black and white and in the last 15 minutes color. Lent a real air of authenticity to what we were viewing. I thought this was a great idea as special effects back then couldn't have shown the realistc effects of mass destruction that was caused on US Naval ships. And this being a very important film needs to put its point across, so real archive footage does engross the viewer more.

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As mongo has already correctly added, the last 20 minutes or so of the film Task Force (1949) is in color, after the Battle of Midway but before the "task force" moves on to Okinawa et al. In fact, the transition scene between the two 'formats' is quite unique. Gary Cooper's character goes to an inner room within the aircraft carrier and it gets quite dark (it's almost impossible to see anything); it's a different B&W hue than the rest of the earlier film. The next thing you know, he's in a room with Walter Brennan, Wayne Morris, and others and the film is in color. From there on out, the film is in color and a lot of stock footage is used including explosions, the carrier's defensive weaponry against enemy (including Kamikaze) planes, and some of 'our' own fighters coming in and crash landing on the decks. The last scenes include Cooper's character talking to the troops before his retirement which, interestingly enough, was in B&W at the beginning of the movie.

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=other_reviews&item=348

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I'm strange, I like to watch the opening credits. (You learn a lot of names that way.) The movie has the Technicolor credit in rather large type so you know something's coming but the fun is in how it's done.

 

You're right in that with a chance to use color battle footage it is going to have to mesh with the film.

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I missed that in the opening credit, movieman, and hence was surprised by it. I was asking myself "who turned out the lights" when I saw the strange B&W footage between the two formats. The movie Midway (1976) uses a lot of the same stock footage, I believe. At least I think I recognized it;-)

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Hey Chris,

 

No, you're not strange. Reading the opening and closing credits is very educational.

I, of course, always loved seeing the names of people that I knew in those credits.

Johnny Green (MGM musical director), William Tuttle (MGM makeup) and Douglas Shearer (MGM sound technician) and countless others.

Today, when seeing an old film, it's like visiting old friends to see their names living on and I can actually see them. My friends get annoyed sometimes when I call out, "Oh there's Pop Leonard (Robert Z. Leonard) or Mary Boland or (Uncle Sugar) Adolph Zukor!!"......

Yes, I guess it is a little annoying!!!!!

 

Larry

 

Message was edited by:

vecchiolarry

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I agree. I too love the credits. Director, costume design, photography, set design, editing and sound are the ones I always look for. And, you're right. It is like seeing old friends along with the cast. They all worked together, and when you read any of the bios, their names are often mentioned.

 

I finally got to tape The Devil is a Woman, but I started too late and missed the credits! To me, it is not a whole film without them. I will have to buy it someday to satisfy myself!

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GWTWbooklover, the movie "Task Force" (1949) was a lot more realistic than most 1940s war films. Director Delmar Daves made good use of actual combat footage both black and white and in the last 15 minutes color.

 

That's the way the clueless Bob Dorian used pronounce it at AMC, all those years ago (remember AMC?). For the record, the name is Delmer Daves, and a fine director he was.

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Thank's Jr., you are on the ball. And my apologies to director Delmer Daves.

I do recall AMC host Bob Dorian, who I happen to have on video tape introducing a movie I taped years ago. I use to get a kick out of the sly way that he read the cue cards.

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Well, frankly, a lot of his intros were obviously culled from old studio pressbooks, which were usually the product of studio publicists' fantasies as much as anything else (a problem, to a lesser extent, with Bob Osborne's copy at TCM, I'm sorry to say). Maybe it's just a problem with guys named 'Bob.'

 

While it's at least as much the fault of the writers and producers as the host, there's really no excuse for it, because there are loads of people with an encyclopaedic knowledge of the material (but who know better than to trust their memories other than to have a firm grasp on where to find authoritative information), who'd gladly vet the copy and provide correct pronunciations for free (or a few DVD's, anyway).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Mongo:

 

I see where you might give up your birthday thread next year. It's a wonderful piece of information and loved by all. I understand it's a mighty effort and probably draining on your schedule so it may be more of a surprise you have kept it going as long as you have. I certainly appreciate your efforts.

 

A response to your news brings me to the question. Why have so many left? I don't presume you will stop contributing to other things. I know some left during the "upgrade" and the problems that created. You, being the Premier as Larry put it, might have an idea. Do you think it got boring? Did it get mean spirited? Neither of which I think has happened. New people are still coming on but it's tough losing people with whom you've built a relationship. If you'll allow, I'd like others to respond as well.

 

Thanks for all you have done and continue to do.

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Soon after I first arrived on this scene, some posters were bemoaning that a favorite colleague was missing from the Forums. They were bewildered and worried about his absence. I checked his profile and noted that his e-mail address was listed, so I wrote him a note to let him know that he was missed. He responded that he was well, but had grown weary of the same conversations and decided to direct his energies elsewhere. I'm sorry that I missed his time on the Boards, but this is one example of a poster who left...

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Jack, as with any forum people come and go. But, when you start losing some of the best contributors it is a sad occasion. To name a few Ralph, Cindbm, therealfuster (I really miss her) Coffeedan, silentmovefan,Helenwheels, lux0786 etc...and now maybe "bansi4" (mongo) to name a few. I know things change but I'll always miss their times on these boards. I learned a thing or two about my favorite classics here through some great folks. Hopefully they someday return.

(Keeping my fingers crossed)

 

vallo

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Hi Chris and all,

 

It is very distressing when suddenly valued people drop off with no warning.

I did a thread on this very thing several months ago, asking where a number of named contributors had vanished. Some came back briefly and most replied to me through PM's or E-Mails.

Nearly every day I get something via either method. Just today, I got a very long E-Mail from Ralph in Laos --- he's doing very well.

 

Some however, I never hear from again and wonder what????

 

I have some very good friends from the IMDb message board that I correspond with privately; but that board deteriorated into a nasty **** fight with name calling etc.

Nobody moderated that board, I don't think.

Let's hope this doesn't happen here. Agree and disagree politely and gently.

 

Larry

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Movieman1957, thanks for the kind words. I do appreciate it.

 

We did have a terrific group of members when I first joined the TCM boards. Those still around are Moira, Sandy, Spencer, Alix, Coffeedan and on occasion Jeryson aka Patypancake who was a riot.

 

The subjects on most threads were fun and interesting, relating to the subject of films and stars (as it should be on a classic movie site).

Most members were very knowledgable while others were eager to learn.

We also had our cut-ups, some of which were a hoot. And a few sassy ones who usually evaporated in time.

 

I would imagine that a few left due to boredom, since we did have our lulls. I can't imagine how many topics I started to get the ball rolling again. I recall one was 'Hookers, Tramps, and Whores", relating to movies of course.

Some others did disappear due to a fiasco of logging in and then again when TCM overhauld their boards. There are still some that can't log in due to their former screen name, notably the endearing Loliteble.

 

And there were those that did depart due to a few mean-spirited posters, as well as the doom and gloom set, who could be caustic, crude and sarcastic.

These individuals took/take the pleasure out of the boards, with constant complaints and whining. They seldom participate in anything productive relating to our many topics or enlighten us with a thread about the subject of movies.

I for one would never step down due to any such nonsense.

 

I'm considering my departure from the Happy Birthday! thread due to the time and effort it does take daily. Plus the eyeballs ain't what they use to be. Maybe you've noticed many of my typos. Perhaps a new pair of glasses would help?

 

In any event I do appreciate the support from all you guys and must say that there are quite a few good eggs on the TCM site, today.

 

By the way Larry, I also hear from former members in my mail bin. I'm glad to hear tha Ralph is doing well. I enjoyed his trivia thread and also his quips. Please give him my regards.

 

 

Mongo

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Hi again Mongo,

 

I certainly will give Ralph your regards and Charlie T's also.

 

Don't sweat the typos man, hey we all make them and sometimes they provide an unintentional laugh. I've had a couple of hoots with some of your typos but even if I were a perfect typist (and Lord knows I'm awful - I'm a hunt and ****!) I would never criticize anyone else's mistakes. Humanity is full of mistakes and a lot of them are walking around all over the world. But, I'm positive you and me are not two of them!!

 

Larry

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