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***ASK MONGO***


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Mongo,

The Cagney biofilm Man of a Thousand Faces took some dramatic licence with Lon Chaney sr.'s life story. Could you give me a more accurate bio of his life as well as Chaney,jr? Thanks so much..

Ken.

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Thanks so much Mongo for that great info on Toby Wing. Ever since I saw her in the "Young and Healthy" number in "42nd Street" with Dick Powell I was eager to learn more about her. She's one of those familiar Hollywood faces who never really became a "star," but was always a great addition to any film she was in. She was also great in the Warner's musical short "Rythemitis," which is a bonus feature on one of the gangster DVD's that they just released. I believe it's on the "Petrified Forest" disc, but I'm not sure.

 

Anyhow, she was great, and it's so nice to know that she had a nice life outside of Hollywood, save the death of her two sons. At least she had a happy marriage and a family life.

 

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To Lynn regarding Sidney Lumet:

 

The music that was played during Mr. Lumet's tribute could possibly be from his movie "Murder on the Orient Express" of which the score was nominated for an Academy Award.

 

Mongo

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To Moira regarding Fredric March & Herbert Marshall:

First of all a profile of Mr. March was requested earlier in this thread and appears somewhere below.

*********************************************************

 

Herbert Marshall (nickname Bart), a polished English star who, in the 1930s, was a matinee idol. Tall and handsome, with a round face and slicked-back haie , he became a popular romantic lead in early talkies, playing well-bred (and often a bit world weary) lovers opposite all the famous Hollywood actresses including Jeanne Eagels in "The Letter", Marlene Dietrich in "Blonde Venue", Miriam Hopkins & Kay Francis in "Trouble in Paradise", "The Painted Veil" with Garbo, "The Dark Angel" with Merle Oberon, "The Good Fairy" with Margaret Sullavan.

Other co-stars included Claudette Colbert, Deanna Durbin, Mary Astor, Katharine Hepburn, Barbara Stanwyck, Sylvia Sidney, Ruth Chatterton, etc.

 

Just as popular in real-life Mr. Marshall was married 5 times including to actress Edna Best (1 daughter) and to actress Boots Mallory (1 daughter). He had 3 daughters total.

He started out as an accountant and eventually went into theater work before entering the service in WWI where he lost his leg in an accident. He wore a prosthetic limb and continued his acting career without making the loss apparent. It was kept a secret from the public for most of his career.

Mr. Marshall also worked on radio and appeared on television programs including "Alfred Hitchcock Pesents" etc.

His later films included "Foreign Correspondent", "The Letter" this time with Davis, "The Little Foxes", "When Ladies Meet", "The Enchanted Cottage", "The Razor's Edge", "Duel in the Sun", "The Secret Garden" etc.

 

It's a wonder that he never received an Oscar nomination for a number of fine roles during his career.

He has a star on the "Hollywood Walk of Fame".

 

Herbert Marshall passed away in 1966 at the age of 75.

 

Mongo

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Nice account of Herbert Marshall's life Mongo. And I can't believe that he was never nominated for an Oscar! Especially since he played opposite so many famous leading ladies, including, I might add, Norma Shearer.

 

His performance in "The Little Foxes" alone should've gotten him a nom. He was excellent in that, especially the scene when he's trying to get up the stairs to his medicine. I won't say any more for those who haven't seen it.

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moviejoe your absolutely right thought the same thing

when i was reading this thread today on Herbert Marshall

What was the academy thinking or not thinking! When

Marshall was excluded from the nominations that year.

I'm still scratching my head on that one! Maybe crossing

the stage would reveal the hidden wooden leg! Ah come on

academy could that have been it" FOR SHAME TSK TSK....

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Another thing that Marshall did in a movie that just astounded me was in Trouble in Paradise he had to run up a staircase at some point in the movie and you couldn't even tell he had a wooden leg. Now maybe that was a double but I don't think so. Great actor and I agree with whoever said he should have been nominated for The Little Foxes. He was wonderful in that.

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To patypancake regarding Sheree North:

 

Her platinum-blonde starring roles at 20th Century-Fox in the 1950s, as a pseudo - Marilyn Monroe, in such films as "How to be Very Very Popular" in which she dances to "Shake Rattle and Roll" one of the first rock and roll numbers in a movie, and in "The Lieutenant Wore Skirts" she was a knockout.

Unfortunately for her the studio decided to build up the career of Jayne Mansfield instead.

She also co-starred in "No Down Payment", "In Love and War" and "Madi Gras".

Eventually she achieved a total metamorphosis surprising critics with her work and growth giving strong performances in films such as "Madigan", "Charley Varrick", "The Shootist" (all for director Don Siegel) and on television receiving two Emmy nominations, not to mention a stint on Broadway. She is the only performer of her era to achieve such a feat.

 

Still youthful in looks (darker hair) at age 72, she has been married and divorced 3 times and has two lovely daughters Dawn and Erica.

Sheree North was last on screen in 1998.

 

Mongo

 

 

 

 

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To Ken regarding Lon Chaney:

 

He was known as the "Man of a Thousand Faces" starring in such 'silent' chillers as "The Penalty", "The Hunchback of Notre Dame", "The Phantom of the Opera", "The Unknown", "London After Midnight" and many more, and he himself would apply his own make-up in many.

 

Born Leonidas Frank Chaney on April Fools Day to deaf mute parents, he became a master of pantomine and understanding people who were born different.

He left home at age 17 and settling in Hollywood to begin his film career in 1912 with his first film released in 1913.

Once established, his features craggy and severe disqualified him from romantic leads which didn't faze the talented actor.

He would help both Noble Johnson (the native chief in "King Kong") and Boris Karloff when starting their careers. Co-stars Loretta Young and Joan Crawford also stated that he was also helpful to them.

 

Married twice, becoming the father of one son Creighton who would follow in his fathers footsteps as horror star Lon Chaney Jr.

A quiet soul he valued his privacy highly, granting few interviews and disliking the Hollywood social whirl. He much preferred spending quiet time with his family and few close friends, often in his cabin in the Sierra Nevadas, yet he was unfairly labeled as strange and unfriendly. He did not give autographs.

He was quoted "Between pictures there is no Lon Chaney. My whole career has been devoted to keeping people from knowing me".

 

In over 160 films his last was his only talkie, a remake of "The Unholy Three". A few other films were lined up for him including the lead role in "Dracula". A heavy smoker Lon Chaney died of throat cancer in 1930 at the age of 47.

 

At the time of his fame a joke was going around "Don't step on it, it might be Lon Chaney".

 

Deservedly he has a star on "The Hollywood Walk of Fame".

 

Mongo

 

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Ok this is going to be really hard to find the answer to my question. I have basically only a small bit of information on this film since it's been atleast 7-5 years since I've seen it and I only saw it once. It's about a lady who goes to Africa to aid the people there. It's in color and I believe it was made in the 50's or 60's. I think the lady is a widow and possibly has a son. She falls in love with a man she loves in Africa but, in the end she feels it's her duty to stay in Africa and does not go with him back to America/Britain. Thanks to anyone who tries to figure out this puzzle.

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thought i would help mongo out on this one Question:

The movie is "The Sins Of Rachel Cade 1961.starring

Angie Dickinson she goes to the congo to nurse sick

people has an affair with a patient or doctor on staff

i don't remember for sure ! She has her son stay in africa to help the people with her baby son in toe

the man leaves africa, & never sees her or knows about the baby at all... a real tear jerker for me at least!

hope this is the movie and solves the mystery for you....

lolite.

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Thanks for your input lolite. I'll just add that the movie "The Sins of Rachel Cade" is not available on DVD or VHS at this time however a video may be up for grabs on Ebay.

 

Mongo

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Mongo, I'd like to ask another question if I may. I've always been curious about Warner Bros. player Winifred Shaw, usually credited as Wini Shaw. Could you tell me about her? The IMDB doesn't say much. I'm curious about what she did after she left films. Thanks.

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To Moira regarding Gloria Swanson:

 

Moira, in your post when you listed Herb and Gloria Swanson were you referring to her 2nd. husband Herbert K. Somborm who fathered her daughter Gloria?

 

Mongo

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No, Mongo, I wasn't referring to any of Gloria Swanson's numerous consorts. According to some references I've come across in such biographies as Gavin Lambert's "Norma Shearer", Laurence J. Quirk's "Margaret Sullavan" and other books, Miss Swanson and Herbert Marshall were never married, but had a rather publicly torrid affair in the '30s when both were married to others. Apparently this went on for years, and eventually led to both parties living together and being socially ostracized in an increasingly image-concious Hollywood, (though the Norma Shearer & Irving Thalberg invited them to their home despite the gossip). "Bert" and Gloria each eventually divorced their spouses, (Marshall at the time of the affair was in a longtime, much celebrated marriage to the noted British actress, Edna Best), but apparently Marshall's stress during this period of his life led him to drink heavily, and his career, while remarkably long, was never quite the same following this upheaval in his life. After this episode, he drifted away from being a leading man, and, in my eyes, at least, became a much more interesting character actor.

 

BTW, I thoroughly agree with those posters who feel that he was robbed of a deserved nomination for best actor, or at least best supporting actor, for "The Little Foxes". I also loved his turns as W. Somerset Maugham on screen, especially in "The Razor's Edge". And of course, his wonderful acting in the much earlier leading man role "Trouble in Paradise" was delicious.

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To Moviejoe regarding Winifred Shaw:

 

She was born Winifred Lei Momi (the youngest of 13 children) and began her showbiz career in her parents' vaudeville act.

Dark-haired, and beautiful of face and voice, she sang "Lullaby of Broadway" in one of the most memorable production numbers in "Gold Diggers of 1935" in which the heroine (Wini Shaw), falls from a skyscraper, screaming as she twirls down to her death. It was Busby Berkeley's favorite sequence of all his dance numbers.

Another highlight of hers was "The Lady in Red" which she performed in "In Caliente" (another Berkeley number).

Was in many other Warner Bros. films during her most active years (1935-37) including musical shorts.

She started at Universal in 1934 in "Million Dollar Ransom", "Wake Up and Dream", etc.

 

Her first marriage produced 3 children. After appearing on Broadway in 1938 in "Let's Play Fair",she quit show business and eventually had a long, happy marriage to New York theater box-office manager William O'Malley until her death in 1982 at age 72.

 

Mongo

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