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***ASK MONGO***


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I'm trying to find out the name/band of the song that played on the diner juke box in the movie A PLACE IN THE SUN(1951)? After selecting the tune, the beatnik charactor swayed and snapped his fingers to the beat. Thanks in advance! Respectfully, Steve Morris

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Sorry everyone! I have the wrong movie title. I'm trying to find out the name/band of the song that played on the diner juke box in the movie IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT not A PLACE IN THE SUN(1951)? After selecting the tune, the beatnik character(cook) swayed and snapped his fingers to the beat. Thanks in advance! Respectfully, Steve Morris

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I have been driving myself crazy looking for the name of this movie. I believe I saw it on TCM or AMC a few years ago. It is a B/W film probably made in the late fifties or early sixties and is a B movie. I can only remember that the male lead murders someone and pretends to be insane to get away with the murder. The last scene is set in a living room in what seems to be a typical suburban home and the male lead is in it but he goes crazy breaks through a window and tries to run away. It turns out that he is in a mental institution and men in white coats grab him and there were doctors observing him and that is how the movie ends. It is not much to go on but any help would be greatly appreciated.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A question regarding columnist/panelist Dorothy Kilgallen, continued from the Happy Birthday thread of 11/8/06.

 

 

The DEATH of DOROTHY KILGALLEN

A Key Chapter from "Justice For JFK"

by Robert D. Morningstar

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

One of the early victims of the JFK conspiracy of silence, better yet "silencing" in the

aftermath of JFK'S murder, was the noted reporter, columnist and television celebrity, Dorothy Kilgallen. I had watched her for years on "What's My Line?", not realizing that she had any involvement with the JFK story. Years later, I learned that she had broken the convention of silence in the press and written openly in her column about discrepancies in the official story. Suddenly she was dead.

 

On November 8, 1965, Dorothy Kilgallen, was found dead in her apartment shortly after returning from Dallas where she had interviewed Jack Ruby and had conducted her own investigation of the JFK murder during several trips to cover the Ruby trial.

 

She had revealed secret transcripts of Ruby's testimony in her column. Kilgallen had met with Ruby. She had learned of a meeting three weeks before the assassination at Ruby's "Carousel", the Dallas underworld's merry-go-round where the "Big D" mobsters wheeled around.

 

Present at the meeting were Ruby, Officer J.D. Tippit, Bernard Weismann and, she would later learn, a fourth party.

 

Lee Israel, author of "Kilgallen", reports that that Ruby, himself a TV fan of Dorothy Kilgallen, had taken a liking to her during the trial. According to Israel, he respected her more than any other reporter. She had gained his confidence and had several conversations with him in the courtroom. She was given a five minute session alone with Ruby. Some writers have stretched this to a half-hour, others deny it.

 

Regardless, it is a fact that when Dorothy returned to New York, she told friends that she had discovered that Ruby and the slain Officer J.D. Tippit had been friends. They had been seen together in Ruby's Carousel Club at a meeting 2 weeks before the assassination in the company of Bernard Weissman, who had placed the "JFK-Wanted for Treason" newspaper ad in Dallas newspapers on November 22nd, 1963. Studying the Warren Commission Report, Killgallen deduced that the meeting had also been reported to Chief Justice Warren AND that the identity of "the fourth man",which she had been unable to ascertain, had been reported to Warren as "a rich Texas oil man", as Earl Warren described him in the official transcript.

 

She told Israel that she had discovered something that was going to break the whole JFK assassination mystery wide open. She told the same story to her next door neighbor, her hairdresser, her agent, her publisher, and the producer and host of "Nightlife".

 

Kilgallen had told Israel about a very mysterious and sinister player in the JFK assassination to whom she gave the code name "ferret man". From the description of the individual, it is clear that "ferret man" was none other than David Ferrie, another known associate of Jack Ruby involved in gun running, the Marcello mob and other anti-Castro operations from Florida to Texas. At one time, Ruby and Ferrie were co-owners of an airplane.

 

Nightlife's producer, Nick Vanoff, pleaded with her not to broach the subject on the air. She had arrived at the studio with a folder full of pertinent and explosive notes documents. She kept the folder closed throughout the interview. Vanoff, asked her agent, Bob Bach, to send her "a dozen long-stemmed roses."

 

On Sunday November 8, Dorothy Kilgallen was found dead, sitting fully dressed, upright in bed, early in the morning. The New York City Police investigated and the coroner found that Dorothy Kilgallen had died from ingestion of a lethal combination of alchohol and barbituates. All her notes and the article on which she had been working to "blow the JFK assassination wide open" also disappeared.

 

What did Kilgallen know? The convention of silence continued. The New York Times noted the coroner's report. The Daily News noted it as well. Of course, the Journal American took note but nowhere did you read any reference to her Dallas trips nor her investigation into the murder of JFK at the high point of her own career. Every nostalgic memory of her in the Press was a fond one of "What's My Line?".

 

They all abandoned her, no one asked a question publicly. Not John Daly, not Bennett Cerf. No one in the press could be bothered about someone, even someone famous, who had died nearly by her own hand. Indeterminate causes can mean many things and "causes" is plural.

 

It was only the year before the murder of JFK that no one had questioned the death of Marilyn Monroe on the other side of the continent, who had also died of a barbiturate overdose, by her own hand. Neither her diary, nor her notes for her press conference, nor her "suicide note" were ever found. Only Joe D. cared, courageous enough to say, "Those bastards, they killed her."

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I want to ask a question and I'm not sure it is appropriate however it may not be a big deal. Once when I was watching Rhoda(a TV ? again) she said "Now a certain muscle can relax" I hope like hell that I am not asking a stupid question. She said this to her husband after they were married she was describing how she felt since they got married. If I have offended anyone I apologize. I am asking because I'm assuming that it isn't sexual in nature since Rhoda was on in the 70s or pehaps it is and I apologize for being a nimcompoop. Also I've got to post I am going to have to start writing down my ?s by the time my time comes for the computer I forget them. Thanks Mongo and I apologize if I missed the obvious...gwtwbooklover

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gwtw, you have nothing to apologize for. It is a good question.

With the advent of such breakthrough shows as "All in the Family" and "Maude" in the early 1970s, I would say that Rhoda did mean the obvious when she made that statement (in a comical manner).

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Very interesting story Mongo! I just posted that Lyndon Johnson was three cars back from JFK when he was assassinated. He went to Dallas Airport, and summoned a woman judge to swear him in on the plane. They placed JFK's body in the same plane LBJ was on for the swearing in. Johnson at that point insisted that Jackie Kennedy observe the ceremony. I've seen that picture of him with his hand on the Bible with Jackie still in the blood stained outfit she wore that day with a blank expression on her face in total shock. How hard it must have been for her knowing that a few yards away in the back of the plane, laid the body of her husband who was murdered. I'm glad you spoke about Marilyn Monroe also. The story goes she was trying to get in touch with Bobby Kennedy ( Who JFK gave the OK for Bobby to take over where he left off with MM) all day and night and was so angry that he didn't return her calls that she got in touch with Peter Lawford (Bobby's Brother-In-Law at that time) and told Peter that she was calling for a press conference the next morning to blow the whistle on the affairs she had with the Kennedy boys. We all know what happened next. There are so many unanswered questions between the JFK assassination, the Monroe and Kilgallen death and the involvement that I believe LBJ had in this whole mess. The first thing I'm going to ask when I go to the next life is "What the hell is the Story of what really happened in all these incidents"

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mongo,

 

Here is something interesting. I watched the movie "I Cover The Waterfront" last weekend. I noticed a couple of things about the DVD (one of those three movie per DVD side and five DVDs per package deals). Some dialogue obviously pre-code...a snide remark about, I assume, lesbians and the word "****" used to describe the "I cover the waterfront" guy's editor (boss). The other thing I noticed was the graphic "NTP", or "Non Theatrical Productions". I looked the movie up on IMDB to check if "I Cover The Waterfront" was a "NTP" production...the movie was not. I was getting ready to compose a question this forum, but first...I did a GOOGLE search and...the following link was the number four "hit":

**************************************

brackenhe

Re: ***ASK MONGO***

Posted: 09/09/2005 10:49 EDT

Mongo--I was watching an early precode today (that I rented from Netflix and I swear I don't have stock in the company.) It was called I Cover the Waterfront starring Ben Lyon & Claudette Colbert. Released by Non Theatrical Productions (I think that's what it was called.) What can you tell me about Ben Lyon and what about Non Theatrical Productions? I figure it's one of those poverty row companies but I never heard of it until today.

 

Re: ***ASK MONGO***

Posted: 09/10/2005 10:55 EDT

Brackenhe, since the movie "I Cover the Waterfront" is currently a public domain film hence the name Non Theatrical Productions.

The movie was actually released by Reliance Pictures co-founded by producer Edward Small with connections to United Artists.

Concerning actor Ben Lyon, there is a good mini-bio on IMDb that you should find interesting, and which I couldn't improve on.

I for one didn't realize that he was married to actress Bibi Daniels for over 40 years. Enjoy.

Mongo

*************************************

Remember the more than one year old exchange? Of course you don't, but you answered MY question. History repeats...

 

By the way, the "Ask Mongo" link was the ONLY useful GOOGLE link I noticed...well, I just glanced at the results page.

 

Oh, yes...thank you for your 2005 answer to my question.

 

Rusty

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I remember getting to go the Universal Studio Commissary with my parents once.

I was in the sixth grade, terribly shy and terribly awkward. All eyes and legs, as my mom used to say.

 

I got Fred MacMurray's autograph, he seemed tall as a tree, and dressed in flannel shirt and lumberman's shoes.

 

Also sitting there trying to eat lunch were Tony Curtis (Gasp!!!) and Martha Hyer. I was completely content with my autographs, but my dad spotted 2 men sitting at the next table and, using me as an excuse, walked over.

 

"Mr. Bickford, my daughter would love to have your autograph." I remember Mr. Charles Bickford agreed, but looked kind of uncomfortable. After we sat back down (I was clueless as to who Mr. Bickford was) Dad looked back over at the table where he was sitting and said "Oh my goodness" and jumped up. He went back over and looked at the other man sitting there, and said "Mr. Danielle, I am so sorry, I didn't recognize you in costume (don't think he was). May we please have your autograph?" Mr. Henry Danielle was extremely gracious, and complied. What stands out most is that Mr. Bickford kind of leaned back in his seat (I've seen him do this in movies) and gave my Dad the most beautiful grin you can imagine. I think that memory of one friend caring about another has stuck much longer than anything else about that wonderful day.

 

I've been reading this thread for hours, and when I found the question about Mr. Danielle (sorry I'm mangling his name) I just had to jump in. Thanks for listening/reading... and thanks so much for all the great info.

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please give details on 'slightly atypical' version of "A Christmas Carol"

 

I've been trying for years to find out details (such as year of release, who starred in, etc.) of an older, black & white, live action version of "A Christmas Carol" that I saw years ago..

The main thing that I recall being different was that in the scene where Ebenezer Scrooge first is outside the door of his house and encounters the lion face door knocker, the knocker ITSELF comes to life (I suppose using stop-motion animation) INSTEAD of Marley's ghostly face being superimposed over it.

Any knowledge of this version?? I would be much obliged for any insight! I'm pretty convinced that I wasn't just seeing things..

- Thank you, Mongo!

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I had a question I had posted as a seperate thread, thought I would ask you as well.

 

Back in the early eighties, i saw a movie on tv (not sure if it was a telefilm) that was a hogan's hero movie set after the war had ended. not sure when this film was made.

 

it had pretty much the same cast, can't remember where it was set, although it may have been paris.

 

Don't know the name, but i think it had devil in the title (chase the devil??)

anyway, wonder if you know more about this film, or if it is available on dvd.

 

I loved the show and have got the available seasons on dvd and remembered seeing this movie while growing up.

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Khurram, I believe Sandy is correct. The scene that you describe is in the 1951 version of "A Christmas Carol" with the fabulous Alistair Sim.

This version is said to be the favorite and the best of all the versions that were made.

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Rusty, thanks much for your info regarding the movie "I Cover the Waterfront".

I'm glad you got your info, although in a round-a-bout way. Like you, I enjoy doing the research when I want a question answered. It's amazing the info you can come across.

 

It's also nice to know that I made it to Google. What a surprise.

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Knitter45, your post was most interesting and I enjoyed reading it.

It would be any movie buffs dream to have visited the Universal Studio Commissary during the time that you did. I would have been doing backflips.

 

I'm glad that you enjoyed reading the thread, and that you came across grand character actor Henry Daniell.

 

If you ever have a question be sure to visit us here.

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I would be the last person to question mongo's superb movie knowledge, but if I remember correctly, Michael Hordern's face is super-imposed over the knocker in the 1951 version of "A Christmas Carol." In fact, I'm not so certain that it is a lion's head knocker. I know the musical version with Albert Finney has a lion head knocker, but it's it color and the knocker is replaced by Alec Guinness's face. I wish I could answer production4's question, but I don't remember any version that I've seen where the lion comes to life. (as I read the question.)

 

CharlieT

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