Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

***ASK MONGO***


Recommended Posts

That's a carbon-arc, all right: two pointed carbon rods, carrying a high-voltage electric current, are brought into close proximity, causing an electric arc to jump between them, much the same as that used in arc-welding.

 

Besides the tremendous heat (the projectors needed substantial ventilation to keep them cool), which would melt and incinerate the film if it slowed from the 24-frame-per-second speed at which it passed through the film gate, the arcs also generated a great amount of hard ultraviolet light (which is why welders wear those heavily-tinted glasses); in the old studio lights, the UV exposure used to create "Kleig eye" -- in effect, sunburn of the sclera, iris and retina -- in actors, especially those with blue or green eyes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Spencer and Louise Treadwell Tracy had two children. Louise Treadwell "Susie" Tracy was born in 1932; and John Ten Broeck Tracy was born in 1924. John was born deaf. The John Tracy Clinic at USC is named for him. His mother was committed to this clinic which helped hearing impaired children, and still does important work today. You can visit their site at:

 

http://www.jtc.org/about/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, this thread-section sure has taken me back!

When I was 19, and could still buy 2.5 packs of Kools for a buck, I scored a part-time job at the local theater as a rookie projectionist, and learned my trade on just such carbon arc projectors, or as we used to call them, "the iron lung twins".

It was no simple discipline, and looking back, I'm a little chagrined at what I used to gratefully do 3 nights a week for 3.25 an hour!

Besides having to constantly "trim the rods" (adjust them inward as they burnt, by turning huge, Lex-Luthorish bakelite knobs, to maintain just the right micro-gap to create that sun-bright arc), you had to prep the film on the next reel through the running gates of the "off projector", get those rods burning, then position yourself between the two projectors (to facilitate this procedure, they were always installed in pairs), with one hand apiece on both of their shutter-switches, and your right foot on the "juice" pedal that spliced the power on the floor between, while peering intently through the bat-hole at the movie running "out-front".

Upon sighting the first "lifesaver" on the screen (those funky, jagged-looking little rings you can still see, occasionally in the upper-right corner of certain scenes of some older prints), you toed the pedal, which started the electrical feed to the "new" projector & began winding the take-up reel; spotting the second lifesaver, you flipped the shutter-switch levers (down went up, up went down, no eye contact required), which opened the lens of the "new" projector, and closed-up the lens of the "down" projector. If you'd done everything correctly (and the receiving motor didn't stall-out and let the rods burn a nice fat hole in your film), you'd "hit into" the movie's next scene only a second or so past Frame One.

Now, just re-can that last "loaded" reel, in order, for the next showing, and . . . start back trimming those lit rods, on BOTH projectors, and keep an eye on those new reels and that clock!

Whewww . . you know, the Good Ol' Days were often a lot of fun, but not often very easy!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Klondike, your recollections as a projectionist was most interesting. It made me better understand the running of the movie projectors, which didn't appear to be no easy task.

I recall those 'lifesaver' rings on the film, and the reel would change over (sometimes in a different hue, or not in clarity on the screen).

 

I would imagine that you got to see some mighty good movies.

 

Thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, my tenure "in the booth" spanned only spring of '74 to autumn of '76, and here in Central New England, that meant the worst of the Great Cinema Draught

of the mid-70's, forcing us to endure such pretentious spackle as "The Turning Point", "Bank Shot", "Mahogany", "Thank God it's Friday", "Brannigan", "Earthquake" and "The Great Smoky Roadblock".

Only bright spot I can recall: "Fellini's Casanova"; so intriguing, so bizarre, so visually challenging I came in on my night-off to watch it "out front".

Hope I live long enough to see ot go to DVD; every VHS version I've ever looked was just AWFUL!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Klondike, it looks like your projectionist experience during the "sterile" mid-70s hasn't put you off enjoying good movies. My father was an Army Signal Corps projectionist during WWII and, being European born, he was thrilled to be able to see so many fine American movies for free. It made him a lifelong cinephile, and he educated me about films beginning when I was very young. He always commented on the condition of the prints he watched, a habit from his Army days, and I find myself doing the same without even realizing I'm doing it.

 

He taught me also about the life saver, and to this day I can't *not* see it when I'm watching a film. However, it seems to have had more impact when I watched movies in the theater in the past, wondering if the projectionist was paying attention, and if the next reel would start without a hitch. In the little, broken down bargain movie houses in Brooklyn, where the same guy that sold you the tickets and sold you the popcorn also ran the projector, that wasn't always a sure thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> He taught me also about the life saver, and to this

> day I can't *not* see it when I'm watching a film.

> However, it seems to have had more impact when I

> watched movies in the theater in the past, wondering

> if the projectionist was paying attention, and if

> the next reel would start without a hitch. In the

> little, broken down bargain movie houses in

> Brooklyn, where the same guy that sold you the

> tickets and sold you the popcorn also ran the

> projector, that wasn't always a sure thing.

My friend was a projectionist and he showed me a trick that most projectionist used to know when the reel was almost completed. They would slide in a Half Dollar piece towards the end of the reel. When they heard it drop on the floor they knew they had about a minute to get the next reel ready. Simple but quite effective! He always bragged that he never missed a beat with that "system'.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in Bishop, California, north of Lone Pine, where a new film museum has been established honoring the actors, directors, screen writers, and the films they shot in full or in part in our area - films as diverse as Lives of a Bengal Lancer and High Sierra.

 

I have a poster of Blanche Sweet in Judith of Bethulia that my cousin rescued from a building being demolished in San Francisco. Do you know where that particular film was shot? I've never seen the film, just been enchanted by Blanche's face and name. If the poster has any local significance, I'll donate it to the museum, as I did my Maverick poster (I was an extra in the wagon train sequences). Many thanks for all the information on Blanche - I had never been able to find out much about her - she was certainly under-appreciated. Blessings - Pastor Diane

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it an original poster, or a reproduction? If it's original, this poster from D. W. Griffith's first full-length film would probably be of great interest to a movie museum. Judith of Bethulia also featured the Gish sisters, Mae Marsh, and Harry Carey. It's said that Lionel Barrymore was an extra in this film. The movie was made at Biograph Studios in the Bronx. Biograph made one- and two-reelers; Griffiths bucked the trend (and battled the studio) to make this full-length movie. The battle scenes sent the movie over-budget, and Griffiths was fired. This opened the door the independent company, Mutual, and to Griffith's ambition to make Birth of a Nation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, many thanks, Big M; that IS the film, and it IS indeed available (finally!) on DVD, all over the dang place, from Amazon to eBay, and beyond!

Now, I just need to locate a Region 1 copy for less than half a day's wages, and I'm good to go!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mongo:

 

We need your help on the following thread:

 

Re: Title of old B&W movie aired summer '06 with Asian boy selling lechi nuts

 

I'm pretty sure it's not 'Oil for the Lamps. . . and just now it occurred to me it could have been the original 'The Front Page', because it seems to be the guy was always rushing around. Do you have any recollection of this film? I've often remembered the little boy with his singsong voice saying Lechi nuts, Chinee, Lechi nuts. He dropped the 's' from the word Chinese, and when I saw this question, it's been driving me nuts ever since.

 

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anne, I got a lead on former darling child actress Tammy Marihugh, who appeared in the movie "The Last Voyage" (1960) among other films.

In 1955 she was also featured in a book of paper dolls as the 'All American Smile Girl' (approx. age 3).

 

After she last appeared on screen at age 17 in 1969, she eventually went to Las Vegas.

In 1972 at age 20 she posed as a Las Vegas cover girl. (pictured below).

 

Can't say for sure, at this time, how her career in Vegas (if anything) turned out.

Today she would be around 54 years old.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We need your help on the following thread:

 

Re: Title of old B&W movie aired summer '06 with Asian boy selling lechi nuts

 

I'm pretty sure it's not 'Oil for the Lamps. . .

 

On the "other thread" it was determined it was Loretta Young and Clark Gable's movie "Key to the City."

racerT came up with

That was from the 1950 movie "Key to the City" with Clark Gable,Loretta Young and Frank Morgan. The Chinese boy was selling the leechi nuts in the San Francisco police station to a cop played by James Gleason. It was Frank Morgan's final movie. He died soon after filming was completed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

i've been looking for this movie for years!! it's mid 70's, action/suspense...basic theme is an older couple driving a 72ish red chevrolet convertible towing an airstream travel trailer ... then, they are road-raged/tormented by 2 (maybe 3) black custom vans, that in the end, turn out to be the only assests left from a failed financial partnership ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...