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***ASK MONGO***


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Manhattangirl, with such a question I will be posting a spoiler alert in revealing the finale of "Kitty Foyle".

 

SPOILER ALERT-SPOILER ALERT-SPOILER ALERT- SPOILER ALERT

 

After Kitty (Ginger Rogers) meets Wyn's (Dennis Morgan) wife and child at the shop, she gives the ring Wyn gave her to the child, to give to him for Wyn's birthday. Wyn thinks because she did this she wants to be with him, and she considers it, packing her bags to leave, (which is where the movie started her story). As she gets in the taxi, she tells the doorman at her hotel that if Wyn shows up, he should tell him that she is going to get married. Kitty decides to marry the doctor, (James Craig) who had asked her earlier that day.

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Mongo, I just saw "Tootsie" recently and am now watching Robin Williams in "Mrs. Doubtfire". I know Jack Lemon and Tony Curtis were in drag for "Some Like It Hot". My question is this who was the first one in film history to act in drag and don't tell me it was Majorie Main. Seriously what major movie that earned plenty of Big Bucks was the first to have this occurance? ( Silents Included)

 

 

And Mr CineSage jr....."A pun is the lowest form of humor". It gives me the "Whims".

 

Bartlett

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> "A pun is the lowest form of humor."[/i]

>

> Meaning that I can't stop now, since falling off the

> wagon would be impossible.

 

"It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World" must be your Bible then. As your humor is similar and it must be your all time favorite pun filled movie and probably got you started with the pun fun.

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Bartlett, One of the earliest actors of note to appear in drag was Charles Chaplin in the silent short "A Busy Day" (1914).

"In this film, Charlie is dressed (awfully convincingly) as a woman. And, unfortunately that's really about all there is to the movie. No real plot other than Charlie in drag slugging people".

Also Laurel & Hardy did their share in drag in some silent films, among many other silent stars, to be sure.

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"It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World" must be your Bible then.

 

Sorry to disappoint you, Bartlett, but I loathe the movie. MGM should burn the negative to spare future generations the possibilty that they might have to accidentally watch it.

 

Though I must confess that the Bible is obviously the culpable foundation for much of our mad, mad, mad, mad world.

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> " "It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World" must be your Bible then.

 

Sorry to disappoint you, Bartlett, but I loathe the movie. MGM should burn the negative to spare future generations the possibilty that they might have to accidentally watch it.

Though I must confess that the Bible is obviously the culpable foundation for much of our mad, mad, mad, mad world. "

 

Ha, ha! Nicely put, CS; I couldn't have said it better, or more concisely!

Edification with humor is so often our best mental ****!

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All this punning - I love puns - they are what separates us from the beasts. My pets may be able to play, and be brave, intelligent, even try to fool me at times, but I've yet to hear either one of them make a pun. I am an amateur philologist, and I can tell you that every language I've every looked into uses puns.

 

I'd like to point out that when Dr. Johnson (Samuel, that is) said "A pun is the lowest form of wit" he was using "lowest" in the 18th Century sense, that is, it's the simplest form, the easiest to think up on the spot so as to appear clever and glib. Of course, it's easier for some than for others, which is why so many people find such wordplay annoying. Walt Kelly, the creator of Pogo, was a great punster, and I invite you to read any of his Pogo comic strips and find it "low." Can't be done.

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> Amateur philologist? Have you ever encountered Dr

> Morbius?

 

Aackk!! How well I remember getting up out of my seat and running into the ladies' room for shelter when Dr. Morbius did his final invisible beast morph toward the end of "Forbidden Planet." I was all of 7 or 8 years old at the time.

 

I could never face a screen image of Walter Pidgeon again without thinking of that - he scared the philology right out of me. I wonder: Am I the only classic film lover around who finds Walter Pidgeon scary?

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> "My all-time favorite Walt Kelly pun is his name for the turtle character in "Pogo" -- Churchy. "

 

jdb1:

 

Mais oui, certainment! J'oublir ce bon mot!

 

(Even funnier when you consider the ability of that character to "chase" much of anything!)

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> "Aackk!! How well I remember getting up out of my seat and running into the ladies' room for shelter when Dr. Morbius did his final invisible beast morph toward the end of "Forbidden Planet." I was all of 7 or 8 years old at the time. "

 

Yup, ol' Doc Morbius was pretty darn goose-pimply, but I'd sooner spend a rainy afternoon with him than with "Mr. Sardonicus"!

Brrrrr!

Catch ya later, gotta go book myself a room at Pilgrim Farm!

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