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***ASK MONGO***


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Encore Westerns runs just about every existing Republic western, but there's not really a TV outlet for non-westerns made by Republic. Brazil might rank up high in rarity alongside The Pretender, a 1947 Republic film whose existence I'm beginning to question. Several sellers of dupes don't even have The Pretender. TCM has run Republic's The Great Flamarion a time or two, so Brazil might turn up too.

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Notable Republic Pictures

 

1930s and 1940s

Under Western Skies (1938)

Melody Ranch (1939)

Dark Command (1940)

Ice Capades (1941, the debut of Vera Hruba)

Flame of the Barbary Coast (1944)

Angel and the Badman (1947)

Macbeth (1948), directed by and starring Orson Welles

Wake of the Red Witch (1948)

The Fighting Kentuckian (1949)

Sands of Iwo Jima (1949)

 

1950s

Rio Grande (1950)

The Wild Blue Yonder (1951)

The Quiet Man (1952)

Johnny Guitar (1954)

The Last Command (1955)

Track the Man Down (1955)

Maverick Queen (1956)

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Mongo,

 

 

But only TCM shows those 1950s westerns uncut, commercial free and in their original aspect ratio.

 

It has to be a special showing for Encore Westerns to show a post-1950s film in its original aspect ratio.

 

They show Major Dundee and often show the Peckinpah westerns in their OAR but those are the only ones they seem to adhere the OAR policy to.

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Maybe you can help me find this film: In 1963, there were 3 short, black and white, comedies that were put together - The first was called, "That's Me". It featured Alan Arkin as an old hot pretzel seller. He was interviewed at his pretzel stand in Central Park.

The next short featured Renee Taylor and Charles Grodin. This short was about their conversation, in bed, after sex, about Mr. Gordin's "performance".

The last short featured Richard Castellano and Ardell Sheridan (his wife in The Godfather). They meet on a park bench. She talks about troubles her sister is having. He fancies himself a movie buff and like and he likes to add critic's quotes, to his conversation like, "I hear 'Tora, Tora, Tora, is going to be big, big, big at the box office'". I have looked EVERYWHERE for this film but can't find it.

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Okay, Mongo.

I have a question. I don't know if you know, but I'm hoping that you might have some clue, or maybe connections who you can talk to to get this done. Is anyone planning to release boxed sets for Danny Kaye and his movies? I love his stuff, and would definitely buy them. Thank you.

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Pagoni, I came up empty handed regarding the 3 comedy shorts including Alan Arkin's Oscar nominated short "That's Me".

Apparently the shorts were individual entries to begin with and were put together for a showing possibly on PBS.

Couldn't find where any one of them are currently available on video.

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Tygra, although most of Danny Kaye's hit movies are available individually on DVDs, there are no box sets yet available.

You may want to write to MGM who has released some of his DVDs.

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> "Happened to catch about 20 minutes of the Gilliam Brazil while channel-surfing over the weekend. That looks like one bizarre movie. I have a feeling that its brand of satire would not work for me... "

 

Ayres;

 

Well, I'd be the first to admit Gilliam's "Brazil" is definitely a matter of taste . . or should I say "tastes".

It certainly works on many different levels, and accomplishes many significant mood-shifts in some amazingly deft ways . . and although it's overall success level among people I've discussed it with is about 50/50, I've yet to meet anyone who actually regretted the time it took to see it.

Know what I'd recommend? At your next opportunity, give the first 12 - 15 minutes a shot; if you're not intrigued enough to commit to the middle 90 minutes or so . . well, not a very big loss, eh?

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Brazil is very much like the kind of picture you'd expect from Terry Gilliam.

 

I guess that's just another way of saying if you like some of his other movies, there's a chance you might enjoy this one. He has a nice way of coming up with sometimes amazing imagery and often takes you by surprise narratively, or at least tries not to be too predicatable.

 

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen or Time Bandits might have given you some idea of what to expect, if you've seen them. If not, well, it is a weird blend of some Orwellian dystopian future with some very beautiful "mind-over-matter" allusions, although the end result strikes many as somewhat in the bleak side.

 

Of course, his vision was so original and offbeat that Universal Pictures butchered the movie upon its original release, cutting out I think half an hour and ending it with a conventionally happy ending.

 

There was another longer cut, but Gilliam's cut of Brazil (originally released on home video by the Criterion Collection) is far more challenging and in some ways unsettling. (The Criterion box set includes all 3 cuts of the movie).

 

Jonathan Pryce, Robert DeNiro and Bob Hoskins are engaging and Kim Greist seems to strike the right note as the enigmatic angel-like figure that Pryce falls in love with.

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I don't think Warner has a hand in the pre-1996 Goldwyn films. MGM/UA bought the Goldwyn library in 1996, and of course Sony has since purchased MGM. However, Sony only distributed a few MGM-owned titles on DVD before Fox came on board to distribute those titles. Fox is the distributor for MGM's upcoming Gary Cooper set, which includes Goldwyn titles, so I imagine the same situation would hold for potential Danny Kaye/Goldwyn DVD's.

 

Embassy Home Video and its successor, Nelson Entertainment, in the '80s and HBO in the '90s all issued numerous Goldwyn films on VHS. HBO later reissued some on DVD, many of which now fetch outrageous prices on Amazon. I suppose all of these deals were made with the Goldwyn Company itself before the MGM/UA purchase, even though some titles came out on DVD after the purchase.

 

MGM has issued several Goldwyn titles on DVD, but I'm thinking only HBO has issued Danny Kaye/Goldwyn titles, all in the early days of DVD.

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> Know what I'd recommend? At your next opportunity,

> give the first 12 - 15 minutes a shot; if you're not

> intrigued enough to commit to the middle 90 minutes

> or so . . well, not a very big loss, eh?

 

That sounds like a plan, klondike, and only fair. I don't like to dismiss anything without giving it a good try. Tell me this: were the sort of 1940s-looking clothes indicative of a return of those fashions in a future world? (I'm all for that!)

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> "Tell me this: were the sort of 1940s-looking clothes indicative of a return of those fashions in a future world? (I'm all for that!) "

 

Actually, at the risk of trying to opine from inside Terry G's head (for my $, much more interesting vista than was Malkovich's!), I think I'd answer "yes", possibly leaning out as far as wondering if he hadn't borrowed a stylistic page, after a fashion, from the then-still-current "Blade Runner" (and, maybe, just a skooch of influence from Lynch's "Dune").

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HBO later reissued some on DVD, many of which now fetch outrageous prices on Amazon.

 

I have certainly seen sellers asking for outrageous prices for these DVD's, whether or not they sell many (or any at all) I am not sure of.

 

But we could only hope those titles might be re-issued soon! :)

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Very true, cinemascope... we definitely can hope. I think I will maybe try to write to one of these companies. Who owns the MGM titles again? Mongo - thank you for your info. I really do appreciate it.

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Dear Mr. M.

I know you keep very busy, but, in all your travels, have you ever found the name of the extra on "Meet Me in St. Louis"? to refresh your memory, I'm referring to the pretty lady sitting next to Judy Garland in the Trolley Song number. She is wearing a blue hat, and at the end of the number, gives her seat to Tom Drake.

Any ideas? We already figured out that it is not Helen Gilbert.

Thanks, Mongo, from the land of OZ

Nancy

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Nancy, I've checked and double checked all cast members that were listed and still came up empty.

Perhaps we can write to Margaret O'Brien, June Lockhart, or Joan Carroll who may be able to shed some light on our inquery regarding the extra who gave Tom Drake her seat on the trolley.

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