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***ASK MONGO***


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It looks like a question by Dorothygale got lost in the shuffle from Novembe 14th. Perhaps a member out there can shed some light on it. Thanks.

 

Re: ***ASK MONGO***

Posted: Nov 14, 2007 5:12 PM

 

I have just registered here and am browsing through! I thought that it was worth posting this teeny scene that I remember from a black and white movie to see if Mongo can help!!!

 

I see a little blond boy with a toy lamb and all I remember is him saying sadly "come on Lamb" as he walks out of a door. I thought it was Blossoms in the Dust but it wasn't. All I know is that I watched it in the mid 80's and loved it but for some reason that scene is all I remember.

 

Thanks

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mongo;

 

Sorry. I read Dorothygale's question when first published, but drew a blank. It's good to publish it again. As you know, I've received help from you and others when bringing questions to this

site. Maybe someone will log on who can help that potster also. Good luck to her.

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Hi Mongo,

 

In reference to the Dortothy Gale question, she may be referring to "Journey for Margaret," the Robert Young/Laraine Day/Margaret O'Brien film from the forties. The young orphan boy, Peter, has a toy lamb that he carries throughout the film. I believe the scene in question has to do with Peter finding out he won't be adopted, but my recollection is fuzzy since I haven't seen the film in awhile.

 

Peter

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Failing memory is terrible thing. Maybe someone can help...

In recent weeks TCM showed an interesting old film. I only caught part of it, not the begining or the end. I thought it might be British, but I'm not sure. I am certain it was a black and white comedy. It was a "talkie". I meant to look it up the next day but it slipped my mind and now I can't find the name of it.

A clumsy young man was a stock room worker in a department store. He had ambitions of being a window dresser. He is smitten with a woman in the music department who helps customers make their own recordings. Meanwhile, a robbery is being planned to steal all of the cash registers by the young man's rival-in-love.

What I saw looked pretty good and I don't know the name or it, or who the actors were...none of them looked familiar to me.

Anyone know what I'm talking about?

Thanks

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Re: The Ghosts On The Loose correspondence:

Alert posters found the evidence of a nasty getting filmed in an East Side Kids movie. Having seen

it, I made a reference to wisenheimer script writers slipping a few good lines past the Goyem.

The only clear example I can dredge up right now involves a scene in The Sunshine Boys

(1975).

 

This scene has the two comedy-team partners having an argument in a studio dressing room. Walter Matthau is rageing away at his partner (George Burns, in his Oscar role). Burns is winning the battle simply by not responding to Matthau in any way -- ignoring him. Finally, Burns picks up a marker and writes "Putz!" on the mirror, throwing Matthau into further conniptions. That word, as can be told by the context, is synonymous with "jerk". But it's also a synonym

of another English slang term, best rendered here as p***k. In the mid-70's, the filmmakers would

not have gotten away with using the English term. I know I've seen similar movie passages, but I

can't recall any others right now.

 

But I have another question going further back in time. Per allegation, rumor, hearsay and innuendo, there were incidents in the pre-talkie era with similar features. Alert lip-readers

reported that the actors in some scenes were saying things different from what the speech-boards

were reporting, and that some of them were quite racy.

 

Does anyone know of specific examples of this?

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  • 3 weeks later...

Christine,

 

65 year old Michael York is still active in films. He is married since 1968.

 

66 year old David Selby is currently on the HBO series "Tell Me That You Love Me". Married since 1963 (3 children).

 

64 year old David Soul (born David Richard Solberg) was last on screen in 2005. He appeared on the London stage in 2006. Married and divorced 4 times and the father of 6 children.

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There is an old Christmas movie that I can't remember the title to and I watched it as a teen, it was a story about a mom, dad, and little girl; at christmas time the little girl was supposed to walk the star out over the manger in the christmas play at school/church and she had to buy some white tennis shoes so she could walk quietly (set in a time when little girls usually didn't own tennis shoes) later the little girl gets sick and dies and one christmas a few years later a car breaks down near the couple's home and it happens to be a little girl who has the same part in the christmas play that their little girl had and she has on the little white tennis shoes...if you know the name of this movie or anyone who plays in it I would greatly appreciate it!

Thanks...

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I was just curious as to the current status of Dorothy Coonan Wellman. She was featured in the documentary produced by her son, William Wellman, Jr, entitled Wild Bill, Hollywood Maverick, in the 1990's. However, in the recent showcasing of Wellman films, her current status was not given by Robert Osborne or Mr. Wellman. Is Mrs. Wellman still with us?

Thank you.

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I don't know how the TCM Staff or regular viewers consider the William Wellman specials - with Bill Jr contributing to so many films - but I thought this was an outstanding product put on by TCM. Thanks to "Junior" and Osbourne and everyone involved in putting this together. The fact that so many films are now on my Favorites list is almost beside the point.

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I concur with your regarding this wonderful special presentation of Wellman films. He is a most underappreciated director and is a real surprise to filmgoers when they discover the number of memorable films he directed. To further your appreciation for this great man, try and get a copy of his autobiography entitled A Short Time For Insanity. Published in 1974, it is one of the most intriguing, entertaining, and beguiling remembrances ever put on paper. His insights and recollections of many Hollywoodites is fascinating and more than informative. Also, it contains my very favorite romantic passages regarding his introduction to his wife and the surprising spell she placed on this hardbitten soul. Their marriage is as fascinating as his film career. All of us need to petition the powers that be and get Wild Boys Of The Road on DVD. Did you catch it? If not, wait for it again to show as it is a wonderful Depression era film.

Enough of my sermonizing, enjoy the Wellman films, add lots of them to your collection, and the Merriest Merry Christmas Ever to you!

Robert M. Lee, Jr.

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I concur with your regarding this wonderful special presentation of Wellman films. He is a most underappreciated director and is a real surprise to filmgoers when they discover the number of memorable films he directed. To further your appreciation for this great man, try and get a copy of his autobiography entitled A Short Time For Insanity. Published in 1974, it is one of the most intriguing, entertaining, and beguiling remembrances ever put on paper. His insights and recollections of many Hollywoodites is fascinating and more than informative. Also, it contains my very favorite romantic passages regarding his introduction to his wife and the surprising spell she placed on this hardbitten soul. Their marriage is as fascinating as his film career. All of us need to petition the powers that be and get Wild Boys Of The Road on DVD. Did you catch it? If not, wait for it again to show as it is a wonderful Depression era film.

Enough of my sermonizing, enjoy the Wellman films, add lots of them to your collection, and the Merriest Merry Christmas Ever to you!

Robert M. Lee, Jr.

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And sometimes, sentiments are worth two posts! I too think Junior's donated time and discussion helped my appreciation for these films but a lot of them were just plain great anyway. However, his appearance made me start watching them, and after one or two, his post-film appearance ensured I'd stay to the end, even if the film didn't become a favorite. I've watched four of their recordings again and I liked all of them more upon re-watching which, to me, is the acid-test for a film I'll be watching more in the weeks to come.

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This movie ran on TCM a while back, but I can't seem to get a title.

 

Movie has man who is divorced and has a child with his ex (little girl) and remarries. He and his new wife endure the meddling of his ex and his wife is ostracized when they go to what looks like a country club because all of the women are friends of his ex (who shows up at the same time). Ex-wife takes the little girl to what looks like a mountain lodge (or something like that) and then calls him to let him know that the little girl is sick. Eventually, he has to lay down the law to his ex, his mother (who is also meddling) or he won't ever be able to live with his new wife because of all the meddling.

This movie was in b/w and I think from the 30's or 40's.

 

Your help is appreciated!

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Hi Joe!

I was wondering what studio made Made For Each Other< The one with Jimmy Stewart And Carol Lombard I remmember seeing that years ago, and I really liked it. I wish they would show that on TCM.It's one of my favorite Stewart and Lombard films.

Thanks Christine

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Christine, the movie "Made for Each Other" (1939) was produced by David O. Selznick, made at Selznick International Pictures and distributed by United Artists.

 

Monday, I'm not familiar with the plot of your movie since it didn't ring a bell.

In the meantime perhaps one of our TCM members can come up with a solution.

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