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Ronald Reagan's Birthday


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Do you mind naming a few movies where you believe Reagan gave a really great performance?

 

I think he was very good in King's Row but that is about it. Where would you rank him as an actor? In the top 10? 25?

 

I just wonder how you feel his acting compares to say, James Steward, Tracy, Bogie, etc...

 

I don't believe Reagan is a bad actor but just a forgetable one; i.e. if it wasn't for his political career I don't think he would be talked about much since there were so many actors of his stature from the studio era. Just my opinion.

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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:

> }{quote}I don't believe Reagan is a bad actor but just a forgetable one; i.e. if it wasn't for his political career I don't think he would be talked about much since there were so many actors of his stature from the studio era. Just my opinion.

I agree, James. If not for his sucess in politics, I believe we would view him now same as we do Dennis Morgan, or James Craig, or Bob Cummings, or Robert Walker. A minor star who's major claim to fame was as a leading man in B movies.

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> {quote:title=Blondie7 wrote:}{quote}Absolutely TCM should celebrate President Ronald Reagan's Birthday. After all he was not only an accomplished great actor, family man but he was our Leader and President for two consecutive terms(1981-1989). President Reagan was also a successful Governor of California from (1967-1975) also served our country in the US Army Air Forces for eight years and ranked Captain. So yeah Absolutely TCM should without any doubt celebrate former President Ronald Reagan's Birthday. GOD Rest His Soul. Mr. Ronald Reagan would smile from Heaven if TCM celebrated his Birthday.

Not everyone is as enamored with him as you are.

 

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

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> What a load of whoeee! Your post sounds like a Stephen Colbert parody. And Reagan NEVER served in the armed forces, he was in the reserves throughout WWII. The other drivel I won't even respond to. He spent his "US Army Air Force" years not in the US Army Air Force. He was in the reserves and never left the US during WWII. Nearsightedness was the reason. He made movies during WWII. Later he described what the scene was like when the concentration camps were liberated. Even though he was in Hollywood during the time it happened.

 

Well first of all, your statement that Reagan made movies during World War II is somewhat misleading. He did make movies, but not for profit. He was a Captain in the US Army Air Force during the war. He participated and acted in films made by Army Air Force.

 

Reagan was ordered to active duty for the first time on April 18, 1942.

 

Now you may think that his service was not important to his country, but just because he was not serving on the front lines does not mean that he did not serve at all. Many men were not able to fight during the war. But at least he served when others did not.

 

My stepfather was also denied to serve on the front lines. He then began his military career by serving for four years at the Great Lakes Training Facility outside of Chicago. He served his country just as Reagan had served.

 

By just doing a little more research you would have been able to find the following information, instead of making the statements like you did above.

 

As far as what he said about the liberation of the concentration camps, I would suspect that since he was serving in the First Motion Picture Unit, he was probably one of the first men who actually saw the footage filmed by members of his unit during those encounters at the Concentration Camps. Maybe that is what he was referring to. Obviously, those films were not released to the general public for quite some time.

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 

About Ronald Reagan

From the University Archives:

 

After completing fourteen home-study Army Extension Courses, Reagan enlisted in the Army Enlisted Reserve on April 29, 1937, as a private assigned to Troop B, 322nd Cavalry at Des Moines, Iowa. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps of the Cavalry on May 25, 1937.

 

Reagan was ordered to active duty for the first time on April 18, 1942. Due to his nearsightedness, he was classified for limited service only, which excluded him from serving overseas. His first assignment was at the San Francisco Port of Embarkation at Fort Mason, California, as a liaison officer of the Port and Transportation Office. Upon the approval of the Army Air Force (AAF), he applied for a transfer from the Cavalry to the AAF on May 15, 1942, and was assigned to AAF Public Relations and subsequently to the First Motion Picture Unit (officially, the "18th AAF Base Unit") in Culver City, California. On January 14, 1943 he was promoted to First Lieutenant and was sent to the Provisional Task Force Show Unit of This Is The Army at Burbank, California. He returned to the First Motion Picture Unit after completing this duty and was promoted to Captain on July 22, 1943.

In January 1944, Captain Reagan was ordered to temporary duty in New York City to participate in the opening of the sixth War Loan Drive.

 

He was re-assigned to the First Motion Picture Unit on November 14, 1944, where he remained until the end of World War II. He was recommended for promotion to Major on February 2, 1945, but this recommendation was disapproved on July 17 of that year. He returned to Fort MacArthur, California, where he was separated from active duty on December 9, 1945. By the end of the war, his units had produced some 400 training films for the AAF.

 

 

From The California State Military Museum:

Hollywood's Army

The First Motion Picture Unit, US Army Air Forces

Culver City, California

http://www.militarymuseum.org/1stmpu.html

 

Reagan's first assignment in the Unit was that of Personnel Officer, a very important job, since men were enlisting for the Unit every day. Their records had to be set up, and he was their personal contact for questions or any information in their behalf. He was also on the staff responsible for working out the Table of Organization which was most important, because the whole structure of the Unit depended on that. Later, he was appointed Adjutant and performed those military duties with a high degree of consistency and zeal.

Reagan was very well-liked by the men of the Unit who looked up to him, not only for what he represented to them and their present circumstances, but as a person.

Alongside his military service, he appeared in or narrated many of the films.

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lol...Whoa hold your horses. I never said that Mr. Reagan was a top 10 actor or in my top 10. I stated that Mr. Ronald Reagan was a fine actor as in he represented himself very well and held down the fort in several of his roles. The Mr. Ron Reagan movies I enjoy are as follow:"Knute Rockne All American", "The Winning Team", "Million Dollar Baby", "Juke Girl", "Louisa", "Santa Fe Trail", "The Hasty Heart". I really liked "The Winning Team" because one of my fav. actress Doris Day starred with Reagan. I'm just a classic movie nut. lol

 

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=Blondie7 wrote:}{quote}lol...Only in America and it's awesome to be different, have different ideas, likes and dislikes etc... Don't ya think?

Well, not ONLY in America, Blondie (there are other democratic countries) but yeah, we are lucky to be born in a country that embraces diversity. Not all do. Gee whiz, it might be the one thing that saves this crazy, cockeyed nation of ours. I'm a sucker for this country cause a guy can say what he wants without gettin' a bayonet shoved in his belly. And that's okay with me.

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I would love to see Juke Girl since I'm a fan of Ann Sheridan. I liked Santa Fe Trail a lot but I'm a big Flynn Dehavilland fan. Reagan was good in this and the feud Flynn and him had over Olivia was charming.

 

Note I never said you said Reagan was a top 10 actor. I just wanted to know where you would rank him. Since Reagan has been SOTM twice I find it silly for anyone to think TCM has some type of political agenda against Reagan (I'm not implying you believe this put this thread was started on that bogus premises).

 

 

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Here's my top 10, James...Oops my top 25 plus I threw in an extra 5. Mr. Reagan would be in between my top 25-50. What are your top 10 again?

 

 

 

!. Jack Lemmon

 

 

 

2. James Stewart

 

 

 

3. Gary Cooper

 

 

 

4. Cary Grant

 

 

 

5. Charlton Heston

 

 

 

6. Kirk Douglas 7. Henry Fonda 8.Bing Crosby 9. Burt Lancaster 10. Gregory Peck 11. Van Johnson 12. Robert Mitchum 13. Fred Astaire 14. Robert Young 15. William Powell 16. Humphrey Bogart 17. Glenn Ford 18. Gene Kelly 19.Rudolph Valentino 20. Joseph Cotten 21. Robert Taylor 22. Charles Boyer 23. Christopher Plummer 24. Robert Redford 25. Claude Rains

 

 

 

***************

 

 

 

26. James Cagney

 

 

 

27. Steve McQueen

 

 

 

28. Leslie Howard-Father

 

 

 

29. Ronald Howard-Son

 

 

 

30. Gene Hackman

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FWIW Ronald Reagan was given SOTM treatment in March of 2009, less than three years ago, and when TCM was launched in 1994, he made it onto SOTM *before* Bogart, Cagney, Gable, Tracy, Hepburn, Harlow, Crawford, and about eleventy gazillion other better actors. King's Row and Knute Rockne, All-American , his only two films of any real note, are played at least once or twice every year. How Reagan would ever rate a SOTM is totally beyond me, though I guess it's no more perplexing than the SOTM given to the likes of Mickey Rooney or Esther Williams (also twice each). If they're going to have a month's worth of B-movie stars and character actor stars, they should at least go for someone with first class talent and a real repertory. Edward Arnold or Joan Blondell, for instance.

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}

> > What a load of whoeee! Your post sounds like a Stephen Colbert parody. And Reagan NEVER served in the armed forces, he was in the reserves throughout WWII. The other drivel I won't even respond to. He spent his "US Army Air Force" years not in the US Army Air Force. He was in the reserves and never left the US during WWII. Nearsightedness was the reason. He made movies during WWII. Later he described what the scene was like when the concentration camps were liberated. Even though he was in Hollywood during the time it happened.

> Well first of all, your statement that Reagan made movies during World War II is somewhat misleading. He did make movies, but not for profit. He was a Captain in the US Army Air Force during the war. He participated and acted in films made by Army Air Force.

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> Reagan was ordered to active duty for the first time on April 18, 1942.

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> Now you may think that his service was not important to his country, but just because he was not serving on the front lines does not mean that he did not serve at all. Many men were not able to fight during the war. But at least he served when others did not.

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> My stepfather was also denied to serve on the front lines. He then began his military career by serving for four years at the Great Lakes Training Facility outside of Chicago. He served his country just as Reagan had served.

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> By just doing a little more research you would have been able to find the following information, instead of making the statements like you did above.

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> As far as what he said about the liberation of the concentration camps, I would suspect that since he was serving in the First Motion Picture Unit, he was probably one of the first men who actually saw the footage filmed by members of his unit during those encounters at the Concentration Camps. Maybe that is what he was referring to. Obviously, those films were not released to the general public for quite some time.

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> _____________________________________________________________________________________________

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> About Ronald Reagan

> From the University Archives:

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> After completing fourteen home-study Army Extension Courses, Reagan enlisted in the Army Enlisted Reserve on April 29, 1937, as a private assigned to Troop B, 322nd Cavalry at Des Moines, Iowa. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps of the Cavalry on May 25, 1937.

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> Reagan was ordered to active duty for the first time on April 18, 1942. Due to his nearsightedness, he was classified for limited service only, which excluded him from serving overseas. His first assignment was at the San Francisco Port of Embarkation at Fort Mason, California, as a liaison officer of the Port and Transportation Office. Upon the approval of the Army Air Force (AAF), he applied for a transfer from the Cavalry to the AAF on May 15, 1942, and was assigned to AAF Public Relations and subsequently to the First Motion Picture Unit (officially, the "18th AAF Base Unit") in Culver City, California. On January 14, 1943 he was promoted to First Lieutenant and was sent to the Provisional Task Force Show Unit of This Is The Army at Burbank, California. He returned to the First Motion Picture Unit after completing this duty and was promoted to Captain on July 22, 1943.

> In January 1944, Captain Reagan was ordered to temporary duty in New York City to participate in the opening of the sixth War Loan Drive.

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> He was re-assigned to the First Motion Picture Unit on November 14, 1944, where he remained until the end of World War II. He was recommended for promotion to Major on February 2, 1945, but this recommendation was disapproved on July 17 of that year. He returned to Fort MacArthur, California, where he was separated from active duty on December 9, 1945. By the end of the war, his units had produced some 400 training films for the AAF.

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> From The California State Military Museum:

> Hollywood's Army

> The First Motion Picture Unit, US Army Air Forces

> Culver City, California

> http://www.militarymuseum.org/1stmpu.html

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> Reagan's first assignment in the Unit was that of Personnel Officer, a very important job, since men were enlisting for the Unit every day. Their records had to be set up, and he was their personal contact for questions or any information in their behalf. He was also on the staff responsible for working out the Table of Organization which was most important, because the whole structure of the Unit depended on that. Later, he was appointed Adjutant and performed those military duties with a high degree of consistency and zeal.

> Reagan was very well-liked by the men of the Unit who looked up to him, not only for what he represented to them and their present circumstances, but as a person.

> Alongside his military service, he appeared in or narrated many of the films.

>

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> rover27 says: Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in November 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Israeli president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It's inconceivable that someone like President Obama would get away with such an outrageous whopper. But now, nearly 30 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong on the eyes of many.

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> Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in Novermber 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Israeli president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It's inconceivable the someone like President Obama would get away with such an outlandish whopper. But now, almost 30 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong in the eyes of many.

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> *Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in November 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Isreali president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It is inconceivable that someone like Barack Obama would get away with such an outrageous whopper. But now 25 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong in the eyes of many.*

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> Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in November 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Isreali president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It is inconceivable that someone like Barack Obama would get away with such an outrageous whopper. But now 25 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong in the eyes of many.

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> Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in November 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Isreali president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It is inconceivable that someone like Barack Obama would get away with such an outrageous whopper. But now 25 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong in the eyes of many.

> Edited by: rover27 on Jan 14, 2012 6:19 AM

> Edited by: rover27 on Jan 14, 2012 6:22 AM

> Edited by: rover27 on Jan 14, 2012 6:34 AM

 

Edited by: rover27 on Jan 14, 2012 6:41 AM

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> Reagan's fable about being present at the liberation of concentration camps is noted in Lou Cannon's definitive biography of Reagan. It was also reported in the American and Israeli press in November 1983 when he told the story at a dinner for the Israeli president. The account was corroborated by an Israeli cabinet minister. It's inconceivable that someone like President Obama would get away with such an outrageous whopper. But now, nearly 30 years later, the sainted Reagan can still do no wrong on the eyes of many.

 

Okay, so you decided to pick one comment that former President Reagan said about something he may have not participated in. I wouldn't be so harsh on the former president, considering his age at the time he made these comments. The way you make it sound, he was totally in the wrong about what he said and that he should have at least recounted what he said. Would that have made it better or you?

 

There are plenty of instances where politicians say things that later can be said were either falsehoods or lies. This is one of those statements. I'd like to know what you thought of Hilary Clinton's mis-statements of getting off of a plane in Bosnia and coming under fire from snipers. Which later proved to be inaccurate.

 

So before you want to start listing mis-statements from Reagan, you might just want to indicate that all politicians from time to time have said things that weren't really factual.

 

As far as Obama is concerned, you obviously do not either watch cable news or read newspapers.

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> Okay, so you decided to pick one comment that former President Reagan said about something he may have not participated in.

 

Rey,

 

I'm don't want to argue politics with you but I do find Reagan's remarks disingenuous. He didn't help liberate the camps and for him to imply that he did is a disservice to those servicemen who did. Many of those servicemen who helped liberate the camps were haunted by what they saw in the camps and what they saw changed many of them. Case in point, director George Stevens. He and his men helped liberate the camps and as his son, George Stevens, Jr, recounts that story in the documentary he made of his father's service during the War, it forever changed his father, his outlook on life and the types of films his father made when he returned from the war.

 

I have no doubt that Reagan was touched by the inhumanity he saw in the film footage that came back from the War. But there is a difference from seeing something in real time and witnessing that horror in real time and watching film footage of that inhumanity. Film has a way of detaching us from the real life horror that being there in real time just can't do.

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> I'm don't want to argue politics with you but I do find Reagan's remarks disingenuous. He didn't help liberate the camps and for him to imply that he did is a disservice to those servicemen who did.

 

You know what Lynn? I don't want to argue about politics either.

 

But do you know what I don't like? I don't like it when people here decide that they are going to take advantage of a thread or hijack a thread simply because they either don't like a person or because they feel slighted by the actions that the person did while he was President of the United States. It's the kind of actions that get people's blood boiling and they do not belong here.

 

He may have misspoken. Guess what? All presidents and many other politicians do as well. And I am not saying that is alright.

 

I just have a hard time believing that we are discussing the fact that his birthday falls on February 6th and because his birthday is within the 31 Days of Oscar month, he does not get his own celebration on his birthday. At least that is how I saw this thread starting. Of course, around here almost everything eventually leads into a political discussion, actually more like a one-sided political discussion.

 

As has been mentioned earlier by mrroberts, Micheal, our current administrator and moderator has told us that political discussion away from the movies will not be tolerated.

 

In this instance, the discussion about Reagan was ultimately going to shift away from his acting abilities and more toward his political career. He is one of the few actors from the golden age of Hollywood that went onto a career in politics where many people here can not separate his acting from his service as Commander in Chief.

 

As mrroberts said in his earlier post, I do agree that Reagan was a mediocre actor, however I do not agree with mrroberts that he couldn't act worth a darn. I think that is one of the reasons why he was successful as our president. He knew how to speak in front of a camera. Many of our recent presidents should have studied him far more closely.

 

I just find it curious that with a thread about Reagan, the focus has shifted away from his acting and towards a statement he spoke while he was president.

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I find it interesting that you who hold yourself out as above the fray in political discussions would decide to weigh in on this one.

 

There are articles written about this episode that question whether Reagan actually said these things attributed to him by rover.

 

Jake in the Heartland

 

 

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