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"This is Your Story" (1953) funny kinescope


FredCDobbs
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Dang, I haven't seen this in 40 or 50 years. Very funny.

 

Tue. 8 PM Eastern Time, it's only about 11 minutes long.

 

Oscar? and Emmy? winner James L. Brooks comes to TCM as Guest Programmer on Tuesday, Jan. 10

 

8 p.m. (ET) Your Show of Shows: "This is Your Story" (1953)

 

Brooks calls this sketch from the popular Golden Age of Television series starring Sid Caesar "the funniest thing I've ever seen in my life." The skit features Caesar as a reluctant participant on a This Is Your Life-style show, Howard "Howie" Morris as his overwhelmed uncle and Carl Reiner as the host.

 

http://news.turner.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=5923

 

(I'm not sure young people will understand this skit. It is a parody of the old "This is Your Life" TV show of the 1950s.)

 

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I would also like to see the ful 35 mm kinemascope version of:

 

"10 from Your Show of Shows" (1973)

 

These are early '50s TV skits that were so funny, they were edited together for a 35 mm theatrical release in 1973.

 

Edited by: FredCDobbs on Jan 9, 2012 4:41 PM

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That truly is one of the funniest *Your Show of Shows* skits, Fred.

 

However, one minor correction here...the guy playing Sid's uncle is Howard Morris of course, not Harold Morris.

 

(...otherwise known to many a *Andy Griffith Show* fan as the irascible "Ernest T. Bass")

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> {quote:title=sfpcc1 wrote:

> }{quote}Howard Morris also did a lot of cartoon voiceover work. He was Jughead on the Filmation Archies series. Also he was Beetle Bailey on the little seen animation version of the comic strip.

He was also quite an accomplished Director, among other talents.

 

Listing of credits:

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0606593/#Director

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"This is Your Story" was one of ten sketches that appeared in the feature compilation TEN FROM YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS. Released in 1973, this picture revived interest in Sid Caesar and his gang and is a great collection of comedy classics. Though the film had a brief release on Beta/VHS, it has been out of distribution for the past two decades. Amazon has several VHS for a great price. I managed to land a 16 print about a year ago.

 

Other sketches in the feature include The Auto Smashup, Big Business, The Recital, Bavarian Clock, German General, From Here to Obscurity, At the Movies, The Sewing Machine Girl (a silent movie spoof) and Airport Interview.

 

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I was so excited when I spotted this in my guide!

 

On a side note, I wandered onto a Howard Morris web tribute many years ago, written by his son. He was grieving and had not disconnected his dad's phone. Morris's number was included in the article so I called him up. Very eerie to hear his real speaking voice on the answering machine. I left him a message saying how much laughter & joy his talent had brought me through the years.

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>Other sketches in the feature include The Auto Smashup, Big Business, The Recital, Bavarian Clock, German General, From Here to Obscurity, At the Movies, The Sewing Machine Girl (a silent movie spoof) and Airport Interview.

 

I got home late tonight and I finally had a chance to view my DVD copy of this clip. It was as funny as I remember it.

 

Just think, people in big cities had access to the Sid Caesar show during most of the 1950s. I lived in small towns and I got to see only 2 years of the shows, all of them live. For me, this was the funniest show ever on television.

 

Years later Sid did some newspaper and magazine interviews and said he ruined his health doing the show. He said it was a lot of work, and he didn't get much sleep. They had to think up, write, and rehearse every skit in every show in about 5 days and nights. And then they went on the air live each week.

 

Hopefully, someday, someone will gather all the old kinescopes and release all of them.

 

The kinescopes were made because small towns that were not yet on the national telephone company Network-TV Cable, could not show the programs live, and they aired each kinescope the following week.

 

A kinescope was basically a 16 mm film of a live TV screen.

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