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private screenings


cee
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I personally think a regular timeslot should be established for Private Screenings, during which they can be rerun regularly through the entire library of the episodes, and new ones can be premiered as they are produced. There's too many of the older, un-shown ones that some of us have never seen and would like to view for the first time.

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I wish it were financially possible for such interviews to be conducted with people who are not yet considered classic stars. The interviews may have to sit on the shelf unaired for twenty or thirty years until their movies have gained the proper patina to be considered classics.

 

The memories and impressions would be much fresher and more meaningful and the people would still be alive which is sadly not the case with so very many we wish to hear.

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I learned while on the TCM cruise that they approach a lot of classic stars for Private Screenings but most are reluctant to participate for various reasons. For example, I've been wanting them to do one with Dean Stockwell and the woman said "He is a curmudgeon and doesn't want to talk about his career."

 

However, later this spring, they are going to show an interview Robert Osbourne did with Peter O'Toole last year at the film festival in California. It's not necessarily a private screening but it's very good and O'Toole was a very good interview.

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I have recently read an article on psychiatric problems associated with celebrity. It stated that problems arise because of the famine-feast-famine cycle which is marked by greater lows and highs than people normally experience.

 

The work on the set is much harder than any union would normally allow. The money comes as lump sums rather than steadily increasing daily as most wealth is accumulated making the money seem as if it is a gift of the gods making the star feel very special.

The fame is constant and everywhere which is usually true only with heads of state who have slowly climbed the later to universal recognition.

When their career is over it is often also the end of their money and they are left only with infrequent recognition by people who are aghast at how old they have become.

 

The author likened the experience to a miner who had to claw through solid rock and when they reached the surface they found they could fly and then with no warning they fell to the ground from ten thousand feet.

 

The article did not mention names. It did state that when the end of a career is marked by betrayal of friends or family it can create a symptom common to many disabilities: isolationism where the person only wishes to be left alone and not reminded of what happened.

 

The article also stated that the author would not specifically call it PTSD even although there were very many similarities. It did suggest that reminding retired stars of their experiences is on a par with asking disabled veterans to relive their time on the battlefield.

 

Perhaps that is why there are some stars who do not wish to appear on programs such as Private Screenings.

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