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Movie "urban legends"


Sepiatone
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I'm new to these forums. This has been done before, probably. But seeing that almost every thread has in excess of 200 pages or so, I didn't want to search through it all.

 

There are many "urban legends" connected to movies. One being that whenever the Marx brothers were handed a script, they tossed it away and ad-libbed all that stuff. We know that most of their movies were reworks of long performed Vaudville skits that they did so often it just seemed to be off the cuff.

 

We also learned that:

Bogart never said, Play it again, Sam"

Cagney never said, "OOH, you dirty rat"

Carey Grant never said "Judy, Judy, Judy!"

 

But what about other "urban legends"? For instance, was there a shot in Victor Mature's *Hannibal* that shows him wearing a wristwatch? I don't recall seeing it. But it's been years since I've seen the movie, and never heard about the legendary watch until a long time after the LAST time I saw it.

 

 

What other "urban legends" have been dispelled, and which have been proven?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Legend; While doing a turn as a scriptwriter in Hollywood, William Faulkner didn't like it there. On one occasion in a studio he asked a supervisor if he could go home. Permission granted, in the belief that he meant to return to his local Los Angeles apartment. But he went back to his home is Mississippi.

 

Last notation I read on this says it never happened.

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I'm posting this one, without names, in order to ask if anyone knows or has an opinion as to whether there is any truth to it.

 

Alleged roman a clef incident: Young talented singer, with potential as an actor, is under a repressive contract to a band leader who will not release him from the contract. An Organized Crime figure intervenes; the singer is released from the contract, and the band leader's life is spared.

 

Any truth to any part of this alleged event??

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It should be hard to answer without the names, but in this case I belive I know which names are involved. I'm not sure, really, but I DO think it was "urban legend". So popular that it was borrowed for *The Godfather* . People SUPPOSED they knew who "Johnny Fontaine" actually was, but everyone surrounding the production denied it. I too, hope if someone really knows for sure, they say so here.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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The deletions: A couple of attempts at humor (about horse's heads, etc.) that were not appropriate, so I scrapped them.

 

The Forum GENERAL DISCUSSIONS has a thread that was started on Jan 19th addressing one urban legend; the thread title says it all: "*The Manchurian Candidate* was not pulled from distribution for 26 years." I know that's right because I saw the film on TV sometime in 1968-69 or so.

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Well, Metz, since I started this mess, I guess the answer to the original q isn't forthcoming. I WAS trying to find out if the "urban legend" of Victor Mature raising a wristwatched arm in the movie "HANNIBAL" was true. But I also invited other forum members to enter and/or inquire about other legends THEY heard about, but weren't sure if they were indeed fact or fiction.

 

For instance, while responding in the GENERAL DISCUSSIONS room earlier about Bela Lugosi, I thought of ANOTHER "urban legend". This one is that Lugosi coudn't speak a word of english when making "Dracula", and learned all of his lines phonetically without understanding a word. If that's true, it would be amazing! But in reality, it seems it would have been easier and faster to teach him English, which he probably already knew.

Sepiatone

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"the singer is released from contract and the band leaders life is spared"

my question is...whats the name of the movie you had in mind ????

sounds like a twist on the sinatra/producer offer which couldnt be refused in the godfather but i guess you had amother movie in mind???

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*The Wild Geese* (1978), a solid actioner about mercenaries in action. British film, international casting, and filmed partially in South Africa. However, this international production went down without an American presence, even though Burt Lancaster had been offered a role. Two different explanations offered:

 

(1) The producers failed to meet Mr. Lancaster's salary demands.

 

(2) During negotiations, Mr. Lancaster wrote a series of letters suggesting script changes that would make his role larger, and would elbow Richard Burton (!) into a support role. The producers declined these changes, and the offer was withdrawn.

 

I know which version I think is true, but everyone can make up his own mind.

 

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}repeat ...."the singer is released from contract and the band leaders life is spared"{font}

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}my question is...whats the name of the movie you had in mind ????{font}

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}sounds like a twist on the sinatra/producer offer which couldnt be refused in the godfather but i guess you had amother movie in mind???{font}

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metz44,

Do you know how to access a PM that has been posted to your username? I answered your original posting of that question via a PM. Both the author of this thread and I had reasons for wanting to avoid using names connected with this allegation directly on this thread. If you can not deal with a PM, I don't know how to help you.

 

Regards,

flashback42.

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Work on 1957's *Night Passage* was started with Anthony Mann as the director. Mann dropped out, and it was then directed by James Neilson, who got the proper credit.

 

Urban Legend: Mann left because of the presence of war hero-turned-actor Audie Murphy; Mann objected to working with him. Other information contradicts this theory. Any contributions or discussion before I return to the subject?

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Mann left the project, couldn't work with Audie Murphy?

 

The more plausible explanation focuses on the other star, James Stewart. Between 1950-53,, Stewart and Mann worked well together on eight movies, five of them Westerns. In films like *Winchester '73, The Naked Spur, The Man from Laramie* and others, they formed up a basic Stewart Western hero that was viable and popular. By the time of filming *Night Passage*, Stewart was making changes in what he wanted in a hero image. One specific point mentioned: The Mann-influenced Stewart hero would not take in the orphaned boy (Brandon de Wilde) and become a surrogate father to him. Stewart and Mann had worked together to good effect, but they just came to a parting of the ways.

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  • 4 weeks later...

 

Trying to track down something I read years ago, can not find confirmation in the places I've looked recently. I'll hold the name, try to see if this account is familiar to anybody else.

 

Child star, male, very popular. Matured into a dependable steadily-employed character actor as an adult. On one occasion, negotiating for a role in an upcoming film, he asked, as part of his pay, for prints of the films he had made as a juvenile. He was not able to get this, because there were only moviehouse prints available at that time, and 6mm copies were regulated for fear of copyright violations. This individual lived long enough, however, for the technology to catch up, and legitimate reprints, mostly on VHS became available.

 

Has anyone run across an account like this? If so, in connection with what name?

 

 

 

 

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No response. I was looking for conformation that Roddy McDowall had tried to get copies of his childhood performances at or about the time he signed on for his role in *Cleopatra*. Not forthcoming. In a 1975 incident involving an FBI raid of his house, he cooperated fully in an investigation of films that should not have been in private hands. He had obtained most of them directly from studio functionaries, some from black market sources. He was also in possession of Erroll Flynn's collection also. Within a few years, technology caught up, and legal, good-quality copies were on the market for everybody. Mr. McDowall was not penalized for the copies in his possession, because he cooperated fully.

 

Thread open.

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