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What the heck happened to AMC?


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After the 2008 crash, all bets were off on radio and t.v. Anything that can get a rating gets on.

 

I remember when Spike t.v. bragged about being a "man's channel" . Within six months every CSI, SUV and all the rest were marathoned all day on there. Every channel shows everything now. Whatever someone will watch.

 

It seems TCM is a rarity in that its what it has always been. There is room for a TCM2 done the same way. I don't see AMC or Fox having film festivals, cruises and the like. That should show someone that this format gets lots of viewership and it would be a good idea to do it again.

 

Or so it seems.

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Reality shows seem to be the new soap operas (prime time version) which are quickly dying out. I can only hope the same fate for reality shows. There isnt one network series I watch anymore.......

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}I don't really understand why anyone would watch a severely edited version of 'The Godfather'

 

 

Me neither. If i'm watching a movie, regardless of content, I want everything left in. Uneditited. {font}

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Take a look at Syfy (better yet, don't take a look).

Slasher films are being passed off as science fiction and reality shows are taking over.

Apparently, there is a Twilight Zone marathon in progress but these 26 minute episodes are probably cut down to 20 minutes.

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>If TCM ever starts developing "reality" programs I will deposit my television set in the nearest dumpster.

>

>I am so sick of hillbilly hand fishing, pit bulls and parolees, trading spaces, hoarders, extreme makeovers, etc, etc, etc.

>

>God Bless TCM.

 

I often think of us all here at TCM as being in a big lifeboat in the middle of the ocean. We are being battered around by high waves and strong winds, adrift on an angry sea filled with hungry sharks. If this lifeboat ever goes down, it will be the end for all of us.

 

LifeboatTynePainting.jpg

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> I often think of us all here at TCM as being in a big lifeboat in the middle of the ocean. We are being battered around by high waves and strong winds, adrift on an angry sea filled with hungry sharks. If this lifeboat ever goes down, it will be the end for all of us.

 

You really do depend on TCM don't you?

 

What did you do before 1994? Did you watch AMC back when they were commercial free? And before AMC, what did you do?

 

Watch vhs, and beta tapes? You probably went to the movies more too, right? Or you watched regular television also, correct?

 

If TCM does go the way of AMC, which is highly doubtful at this stage, I think you would find something else to do with your time. Some of us have extensive dvd and vhs collections. Some have many, many tv shows they watched as kids now on dvds.

 

There will always be something to watch on tv. Or maybe on the internet. Heck, I find myself watching more content on HULU and other media outlets on the internet than I now watch on my tv set. Eventually, people will start to move away from tv, when they find that their lives are more interesting than sitting for hours in front of a tv set.

 

Even me, in the last week got rid of my higher tier of cable programming. I don't even get TCM anymore.

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>Eventually, people will start to move away from tv, when they find that their lives are more interesting than sitting for hours in front of a tv set.

 

I assure you that my life was very interesting for more than 60 years, and right now I would prefer to be sipping coffee in the Cafe Esmeralda in San Jose, Costa Rica, or riding in a Land Rover in the jungle west of Uxmal, or riding in a bus filled with medical missionaries on a trip back to Oropoli, Honduras, but I can no longer travel.

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In days gone by, you could depend on one thing....school semesters, car models and television seasons were all from about September to June.

 

Now it's just car models and school semesters.

 

Now, some TV series have seasons that are just so many episodes long. One show might produce and broadcast nine or so "new" episodes. Then they'll take a five week break. THEN another nine episodes start, and THAT'S a "NEW SEASON"! Take "Dancing With The Stars"(please!). They've been on half as many years as "seasons" they claim to have shown. Others seem to have had five "seasons" in a couple of years.

 

All of them seem to have deteriorated to a degree. During the daytime, Food Network is the same it's always been. In "prime time" however, it's become one kind of "challenge" after another. or else, like now, a Guy Fieri marathon. "Iron Chef", "Cupcake Wars", "Chopped", "The Next Whatever". It goes on and on.

 

There ARE some very good original programming done on some of the other networks. TNT's "Leverage" is pretty good. USA, which was practically a throwaway channel, has come up with "Burn Notice", "Royal Pains" and "In Plain Sight", all well written and well acted.

 

But the "Big Three" still stagger and stammer, with maybe a couple of acceptable comedies between them. Their "dramas" are still somewhat formulaic and sophmoric. Cripes, even "TVland" is doing better with some of THEIR originals!

 

So it seems TCM has become an oasis of sorts, offering something to viewers to let them occasionally drift back in reverie and wax nostalgic. I'm glad it hasn't yet changed. Yet.

Sepiatone

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>Take a look at Syfy (better yet, don't take a look). Slasher films are being passed off as science fiction and reality shows are taking over. Apparently, there is a Twilight Zone marathon in progress but these 26 minute episodes are probably cut down to 20 minutes.

 

If they start and end on the hour and half hour, that means about 3 to 4 minutes have been edited out of them.

 

But occasionally the Syfy channel has run them with no edits, and those episodes last about 35 to 40 minutes. You can tell by their daily schedule. With this type of unedited episode, most of them start and end at odd times, such as 10 min. after an hour, or 20, or 30, etc.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > God Bless TCM.

> I often think of us all here at TCM as being in a big lifeboat in the middle of the ocean. We are being battered around by high waves and strong winds, adrift on an angry sea filled with hungry sharks. If this lifeboat ever goes down, it will be the end for all of us.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

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> LifeboatTynePainting.jpg

Most of what I record, mostly early talkies through the film-noir era, is archived for such a (time-shifting) eventuality. Currently there are more than 11,000 home recorded DVDs in my archive with programming from The Nostalgia Channel (1986-1990), AMC (1990-2001), and TCM (the first six months of 1997 and since 2001).

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> {quote:title=FloydDBarber wrote:}{quote}Take a look at Syfy (better yet, don't take a look).

> Slasher films are being passed off as science fiction and reality shows are taking over.

> Apparently, there is a Twilight Zone marathon in progress but these 26 minute episodes are probably cut down to 20 minutes.

Yes, and on those TZ episodes I watched on their New Year's marathon, it was painfully obvious when a cut was made.

 

SyFy does NOT pass slasher films off as sci-fi...that channel has always had horror-related programming as part of their schedule. They don't run ONLY sci-fi programs.

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I believe that AMC was started by idealists with little concept of business. A channel could not survive financially if it had to rent all of the movies it aired.

 

Mr. Turner was very wise to acquire a library of movies which TCM could freely air and excess revenue could be used to rent special movies from other libraries.

 

When AMC's initial funding ran out it was taken over by business people who changed the format to one which could survive.

 

I am reasonably sure that splitting the library off from TCM operations included either a substantial amount of money which could be put out at interest or it included a provision that movies could be rented from it at a very modest cost.

 

I believe that with the addition of advertisements between movies and branding of DVD releases TCM will be able to survive. The current owners seem to treat it as a loss-leader. The awards it receives improve the standing of the megacorpology and they will keep it pristine as long as it does not start to hemorrhage money.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

>

> LifeboatTynePainting.jpg

>

 

I'm afraid that when the weather's that bad in my neighborhood, my electricity goes out, and I can't watch TCM. I wind up reading the newspaper by kerosene lamp light, listening to jazz and blues on the boombox.

 

Seriously, I share your sentiments. But, I would describe TCM as an oasis amidst deserts and junkyards. :)

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> > I'm afraid that when the weather's that bad in my neighborhood, my electricity goes out, and I can't watch TCM. I wind up reading the newspaper by kerosene lamp light, listening to jazz and blues on the boombox.

 

My esso tells of growing up in an area where blizzards would take down the power lines and they would have to watch television by candle light.

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> I assure you that my life was very interesting for more than 60 years, and right now I would prefer to be sipping coffee in the Cafe Esmeralda in San Jose, Costa Rica, or riding in a Land Rover in the jungle west of Uxmal, or riding in a bus filled with medical missionaries on a trip back to Oropoli, Honduras, but I can no longer travel.

 

Well, I am sorry to hear that Fred. For you and countless millions of other Americans who can no longer travel, at least having TCM can be a blessing.

 

But eventually cable television will be replaced by something else. And for those of us with libraries of DVDs, VHS tapes, books, and other forms of media, I guess what you could say is that what we have been doing is stock piling for that day in the near future where cable television will be so expensive, none of us will be able to afford it.

 

And until that time those of us who can will continue to collect. Right now my collection days are behind me, but once I attain another position someplace, my collecting will continue. Until then I will make do with the 500 plus DVDs, 100 plus VHS tapes, and over 500 plus hours of tv programs I have recorded or bought.

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}

> My esso tells of growing up in an area where blizzards would take down the power lines and they would have to watch television by candle light.

 

Ah, yes... candlelight finger puppets on the front of a dark TV. I've done that... :D

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>Seriously, I share your sentiments. But, I would describe TCM as an oasis amidst deserts and junkyards.

 

My lifeboat story is a metaphor, just as your oasis story is. The lifeboat is TCM, the shark infested waters all around us are all the other TV channels, and the sharks are the bad programming and the commercials of those channels.

 

We odd assortment of eclectic vagabonds are huddled together as strangers trying to help each other survive the sinking of the Titanic movie industry, which used to carry us all along in safety and splendor in a wonderful dreamland of beautiful storytelling.

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My esso tells of growing up in an area where blizzards would take down the power lines and they would have to watch television by candle light.

 

Rimshot... :)

 

Best part - esso. What's an oil company got to do with this? Ahhhh.....esso. S.O. I like it.

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> {quote:title=willbefree25 wrote:}{quote}

> > My esso tells of growing up in an area where blizzards would take down the power lines and they would have to watch television by candle light.

> Rimshot... :)

 

Definitely. :) His delivery is so smooth you do not realize the absurd things he adds.

 

> Best part - esso. What's an oil company got to do with this? Ahhhh.....esso. S.O. I like it.

 

I thank you. One of his short stories is set in the far future where there are so many variations of marriage and civil unions that people refer to their partners as their Significant Others as a generalization and pronounce it as "esso". I liked it so much I have adopted the term.

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> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote}

> SyFy does NOT pass slasher films off as sci-fi...that channel has always had horror-related programming as part of their schedule. They don't run ONLY sci-fi programs.

 

I believe it is difficult to separate horror from science fiction. Frankenstein was the first important modern example of each and it is both.

 

I like some programs on SyFy. I find Face Off very interesting and their products are amazing. It is as close to a "reality" show as I like. I like some episodes of Haven and I feel Merlin has been very well done. I liked their Neverland and I feel it was well done for what it was. I was sorry to hear that Eureka has run its course. I am looking forward to the next season of Warehouse 13

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Sans, when I was a kid, and used to crack wise with my Dad about "You mean they had ELECTRICITY when you were a kid?" He used that line. What made it funnier was that when HE was a kid, there WASN'T any television.

Sepiatone

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}I believe that AMC was started by idealists with little concept of business. A channel could not survive financially if it had to rent all of the movies it aired.

>

> Mr. Turner was very wise to acquire a library of movies which TCM could freely air and excess revenue could be used to rent special movies from other libraries.

>

> When AMC's initial funding ran out it was taken over by business people who changed the format to one which could survive.

>

> I am reasonably sure that splitting the library off from TCM operations included either a substantial amount of money which could be put out at interest or it included a provision that movies could be rented from it at a very modest cost.

>

> I believe that with the addition of advertisements between movies and branding of DVD releases TCM will be able to survive. The current owners seem to treat it as a loss-leader. The awards it receives improve the standing of the megacorpology and they will keep it pristine as long as it does not start to hemorrhage money.

SansFin, great post, and I think very insightful. It's a shame that AMC wasn't established on more sure footing, because it would be great to have two channels airing classic films. It's unfortunate that whoever owns the Universal/Paramount libraries didn't invest and see it as an opportunity (like Turner did with initially TNT and then TCM) to showcase it's archives. I never had AMC back in the day, unfortunately. When my cable system finally added it, they were already airing ads in between the movies, and you could tell the writing was on the wall. Within a year, they tanked totally.

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