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spencerl964

Your Pix; Top 5 OSCARLESS PERFORMANCES???

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This is another item obviously driven by TCM's annual "31 Days of OSCAR" I have been checking in periodically & throwing ACADEMY trivia to fans of the ultimate in not only tv networks, but websites as well-(P.S. we still need an EDIT button though!?)

 

Just wanted to see what would be most cinephiles candidates for the top 5 or whatever # you want. Performances in motion picture history, that either lost the OSCAR, or wasn't even in the race that yr.???

 

Per usual, I jump started it with a couple of my own-(for what it's worth?)

 

Performances by an actor that deserved to win "The Golden Boy">

1958 Spencer Tracy in "Old Man & the Sea"-(lost to David Niven in "Separate Tables")

1936 Charles Chaplin, "Modern Times"-(winner: Paul Muni, "Story Louis Pasteur")

1949 James Cagney in "White Heat"-(winner: Broderick Crawford, "All the King's Men")

1973 Steve McQueen, "Papillon"-(OSCAR winner: Jack Lemmon in "Save the Tiger")

1941 0rson Welles in "Kane"-(winner: Gary Cooper in "Sergeant York")

 

& Performances by an actress that shoulda' won>

1932-33 Greta Garbo in "Queen Christina"-(winner: Katharine Hepburn in "Morning Glory"-(TRIVIA: Kate thought she deserved it for same yrs. "Little Women")

1937 Garbo in "Camille"-(OSCAR went with: Luise Rainer, "The Good Earth")

1961 Natalie Wood, "Splendor in the Grass"-(winner: Sophia Loren, "Two Women")

1989 Michelle Pfeiffer,"Fabulous Baker Boys"-(winner: Jessica Tandy in & as "Driving Miss Daisy")

 

& many, many, more Thank You

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WOW! I kinda' forgot James Stewart as George Bailey in 1946's "It's a Wonderful Life"-(1946 winner: Fredric March "Best Years of 0ur Lives") I respect the now virtually forgotten-(despite 2 leading ACADEMY AWARDS)>*Fredric March-(1897-1975)

However, I never thought his work in that superb drama was nearly as strong.

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I have always believed that Jean Simmons' performance as Sister Sharon Falconer in "Elmer Gantry" deserved the 1960 best actress oscar. Danny Peary in his book "Alternate Oscars" agrees and considers Jean Simmons to be the best choice for the Academy Award over Elizabeth Taylor even though Jean's performance was not even nominated. He says "She peaked in ELMER GANTRY, giving her most self-assured performance in her most difficult role."

 

Janus

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I agree wholeheartedly that Jean Simmons should have been nominated for best actress as Sister Sharon for her fine performance in "Elmer Gantry" (1960).

However it was nominee Deborah Kerr that should have won the Oscar for her outstanding performance in "The Sundowners" that year. She was wonderful in the role and due to win.

It is now common knowledge that Elizabeth Taylor got a sympathy win in "BUtterfield 8" for a performance that she herself didn't care for.

 

Mongo

 

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Hey Spence!

 

Not that this is directly related to your post, but I just wanted to say that I liked the TCM music for the Oscar movies.

:)

 

Carry on.

 

*Write back, Stranger*

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Barbara Stanwyck is the best actress who never won an Oscar, there's too much great performances she gave for me to list.

 

Nina Mae McKinney in Hallelujah. King Vidor got nominated but it was her who did the work.

 

Myrna Loy gave many good performances. Never won. Too many titles to list.

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To jposkitt & all, great to see you on here!!!

& in regard to this very topic. The special Hollywood issue of Vanity Fair magazine has a superbly drawn caricature of folks whom never won an ACADEMY AWARD-(Edward G., Stanwyck, Garbo, Garfield, Dietrich, Hitchcock & sev. others-(P.S. though they really dropped the ball in not including Myrna Loy?) It's a great issue though & most should check it out!

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I've always thought that Bette Davis should have won for Of Human Bondage, and that she was therefore a sentimental favorite for Dangerous the following year, which she won. Similarly, Liz Taylor was more deserving of an Oscar in Suddenly Last Summer, but instead won the following year for Butterfield 8, again a possible sentimental choice for being overlooked the previous year.

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To lux, a lotta' controversy still surrounds her not even winning what would have been Davis' very 1st of all 10 leading actress nods. for "0f Human Bondage" (1934) It has mainly to do with her then boss Jack L. Warner. He didn't want her to do the picture & it was not a Warner Bros. release either. However, most on here know of her strong-will vs. WB's way back then-(though *Cagney was about the 1st to "strike")

Given she obviously did indeed do the film, he then alledgedly put the word out to all in the AMPAS, that Davis was not permitted to even be nominated for a role she deserved-(in my view anyway) to even win & in a walk. & of course, she was ignored for-it.

For '34

*Claudette Colbert in "It Happened 0ne Night"-(of course won)

Norma Shearer, "Barretts of Wimpole Street"

Grace Moore, "0ne Night of Love"

& this was the yr. that created such a controversy(besides "Bet" Myrna Loy was ignored for "The Thin Man")

& the ACADEMY was bombarded with complaints!

So, they kinda' gave in to the public a bit. & permitted write-in votes-(this was also included for 1935 as well)

& they went even further, in citing all runners-up & official-(supposedly anyway) results, even after permitting write-in voting:

*Colbert still of course won

followed by: N. Shearer & in 3rd place was Bette Davis in "0f Human Bondage"

 

I agree 100 per cent with most aboyt *Liz Taylor in "Butterfield 8"-(by the way, rumor has it, she despises being called "Liz")

Most have heard of her near fatal illness at OSCAR time that year & most suspect it was sympathy voting that yr.

& Jean Simmons-(a grand lady & actress!) deserved to be acknowledged for same yrs. "Elmer Gantry"-(loosely based on real life preacher: Aimee Simple McPherson)

 

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My picks:

 

Male

Bob Hoskins in "Mona Lisa" lost to Paul Newman

Donald Sutherland in "Day of the Locust" lost to Robert DeNiro

James Stewart in "Vertigo" lost to David Niven

Laurence Olivier in "Richard III" lost to Ernest Borgnine (great but I think Rod Steiger did Marty better)

Edward G in "Scarlet Street" lost to Ray Milland

 

Female

Liv Ullman in "Scenes from a Marriage" lost to Glenda Jackson

Jane Wyman in "All That Heaven Allows" lost to Anna Magnani

Jennifer Jones in "Duel in the Sun" lost to Olivia

Barbara Stanwyck in "Double Indemnity" lost to Ingrid Bergman

Bette Davis in "Little Foxes" lost to Joan Fontaine

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Walter Huston should have won for "Dodsworth", he lost to Paul Muni ("The Story of Louis Pasteur").

 

And Joan Fontaine's restrained, subtle, magnificent performance in the 1948 wan't even nominated. The same applies to Jennifer Jones luminous performance in "Portrait of Jennie" that same year.

 

Just my opinion.

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Too lazy to research it at the moment, but I didn't know Newman ever won an oscar, I thought he was in that group of those really good actors that never won (except for special achievement). I could be wrong. I thought he should have won for The Verdict.

 

Also, was Marty and Richard III the same year? The former was 1955 and the latter 1953, yes?

 

Interesting comment about Steiger. Did he do Marty on Broadway?

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To venerados, exceptional stats. on your part pal!

& did you know, that back for 1986's OSCARS. Bob Hoskins-(1942-)-(A powerhouse actor & a kinda' limey: *Cagney or sorts!) He won virtually every single Pre-OSCAR Film Award

Except of course the biggie. Which all knew would go to "Fast Eddie Felson" the 2nd time around, in Scorsese's-(most don't remember he helmed that 1 as well?) "The Color of Money"-(Paul Newman-(1925-) has since snagged a 9th nomination-(though for s. actor 2002's "Road to Perdition")

 

By the way, Hoskins was as strong in 1980's "Last Good Friday" (***1/2-out of 4) A British Crime-Drama

 

& I agree 100 per cent about: Rod Steiger-(1925-2001) in his 1953 tv kinescope as "Marty"-(NOTE: Does anyone know why he didn't do the film vrsion? He was on "Pvt. Screenings" Though I don't think he touched on it?)

 

(CORRECTION: Though you did terriffic stuff. I call it "Apocalypse Hollywood" But "Day of the Locusts" was officially a 1975 release-(because Burgess Meredith won his 1st of just 2 supporting nods. for it)

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To lux0786, you mentioned *Lord 0livier's-(1907-89)

"Richard 111" He won yet another of his 10 total noms. for his work in it. & it's often listed among the greatest performances ever on film-(I personally agree)

 

You were on the $$$ *"Marty" though a very good movie (***1/2) swept 4 OSCARS for 1955-(another great cinematic yr. Of course under 1939 though!>(that legendary yr. it justifiably ranked as A #1) '55 though, did have some heavyweights>"Night of the Hunter"/ "Rebel Without a Cause"/ "East of Eden"/ "Bad Day at Black Rock"/ "Man With the Golden Arm"/ "Mister Roberts"/ "Blackboard Jungle"/ "Summertime"/ "Love Me or Leave Me"-(ridiculously James Cagney's 3rd & final nomination?) & several others. However, via comparsion with what Hollywood thought were the top 5 for 1955:

*"Marty"

"Love Is a Many Splendored Thing"

"Mister Roberts"

"Picnic"-(NOTE: Obviously the runner-up to *"Marty," given it's the sole BP contender, that was also in the BD race!?)

"The Rose Tattoo"

 

& you are correct. Newman was also up for 1982 superbly crafted courtroom drama by Sidney Lumet>"The Verdict"

 

Thank You

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Man, man, 0, man! I forgot yet another great 1955 release-(remade pretty weakly by *Michael Cimino in 1990)

"The Desperate Hours" William Wyler was likely "snubbed' for yet another BD shot for his claustrophobic direction-(he already holds record as most BD shots with 12)

& it was *Bogey's penultimate picture as well-(he only did 1 more & it was almost as good>1956's "The Harder They Fall"-(the latter should rate among Hollywoods finest Boxing flix too!)

 

But, among "Actresses" & Alternate OSCARS

Stanwyck in 1941's wonderful screwball-comedy: "Ball of Fire" as Suger Puss 0'Shea!-(Coop was also excellent at comedy here!) Babara was also wonderful in same yrs. "Lady Eve"

I may be in the minority here. But I could never understand why: Joan Fontaine-(1917-) won for "Suspicion" that year? Essentially, it was her same type of role from previous yrs. *"Rebecca"-(a great movie though) Looking quietly scared was basically it? Though I admit I have never as yet caught her "Letter from an Unkown Woman"-(which mas a massive following!)

To this viewer anyway, I like her sis Olivia de Havilland-(1916-) a lot more.

-(FINAL NOTE: I spoke of current special Hollywood issue of Vanity Fair. Welp, *Olivia is also in it & in an interview from France)

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Bob Hoskins was great in The Long Good Friday, along with Helen Mirren in a terrific performance as his upper-class girlfriend and a young Pierce Brosnan in a small part as an IRA assassin posing as a gay guy. Really a must-see!

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1. Karen Black in "The Day of the Locust"

2. Jessica Lange in "Frances" and "Sweet Dreams"

3. Joan Crawford in "Humoresque"

4. Greta Garbo in "Camille"

5. Nicole Kidman in "Birth"

 

 

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therealfuster,

 

I just found this thread and was thinking about Edward G. Robinson. Can you believe the man was NEVER even nominated for an Oscar? Sure, most folks know him as Rico in Little Caesar (1931) and other such films. But, he also spoofed himself comically in A Slight Case of Murder (1938), and played some terrific, sensitive roles later in films like Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet (1940) & Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945). His career spanned many years, and included a lot of terrific roles. It's a shame that the only recognition he ever received from the Academy was two months after he died.

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Yes, Edward G. had demonstrable range and longevity. Two qualities to be respected. The films I could list are many, the recognition was missing, however. What a shame!

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MY TOP 5 PICKS for should have won Oscars:

 

ACTORS:

1. Clark Gable in GONE WITH THE WIND

2. Charles Boyer in GASLIGHT

3. James Cagney in LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME

4. Ralph Richardson in THE HEIRESS (leading, not supporting)

5. Laurence Olivier in REBECCA

 

ACTRESSES:

1. Olivia de Havilland in THE SNAKE PIT

2. Judy Garland in A STAR IS BORN

3. Deborah Kerr in BLACK NARCISSUS

4. Janet Leigh in PSYCHO (leading, not supporting)

5. Ida Lupino in THE HARD WAY

 

As for another, Joan Fontaine deserved at least an Oscar nomination for LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN, but up against the other '48 nominees I don't think she would have had a chance.

 

Neil

 

 

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