Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The ?career? of a film buff


Julie_Ess
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

Hi everyone. I’m doing an assignment as part of my masters degree (in Information) that asks us to look at particular “hobby” or past-time, and analyse the way in which the “career” of that past-times starts and develops over time, specifically in reference to information accumulation.

 

 

I’d very much appreciate hearing from any of you who consider yourselves “Serious film-buffs”, though I’d ideally like to hear from people who have a particular interest in classic, studio-era hollywood films.

 

 

I have a few questions that might help to guide your responses:

 

 

How did this particular interest begin for you, and how has it developed since then?

 

 

If you were to think of your interest in films as a “career” at what stage would you be at? Could you define various stages of a “film buff career”?

 

 

How did you go about seeking information and rounding out your film knowledge, and what did you do with that information once you had it?

 

 

What role has the film community in general played in the development of this past-time? (This could be online communities, such as this one, or local communities, or anything with a social aspect at all).

 

 

How long have you considered yourself a film-buff? Do you think this interest will continue to further develop in the future?

 

 

Can you think of a time when your interest in film was at an “all time high”? (Or is it currently at an all time high?)

 

 

Thanks so much for your time! I hope this isn’t too much of an annoyance!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised no one has responded to you yet, but be patient and others will respond.

 

I became a movie buff from the very beginning when I was a little kid in the late 1940s. This was because my dad had worked part-time as a projectionists assistant, starting in a silent film theater in the late 1920s, and also into the sound era in the '30s.

 

So, he told me things about films and how they were made, when I was just a little kid, and I gradually learned the difference between average films and great classic ones.

 

And then I had the good fortune to see some real classics when they were first released to the theaters when I was a kid, such as Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The Naked City, both in 1948, Intruder in the Dust in 1949, Broken Arrow (with James Stewart) in 1950, High Noon in 1952, and many others of the late 1940s and early '50s.

 

I saw Gone with the Wind during a theatrical re-release in 1953, King Kong during a re-release in 1952, and the neo-realism Italian film, Bitter Rice, during its first American release in 1952. I saw the silent documentary Chang (1927) in a small independent theater in 1952. That's the film about the elephants destroying a small village of bamboo huts in Siam, and it is sometimes shown on TCM. I think I was very lucky because the owner of that theater was also a film buff, and he often scheduled foreign and old classic films in that small theater in a small town in Alabama. I was 10 and 11 years old at that time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I support education and I was pleased to see a well-written and polite post from a new member!

 

I am sad to say I can not answer the questions because I do not feel that watching classic movies is either a "hobby" or a "career". It is simply a part of me. One might as well ask such questions of my being left-handed. It was not a conscious choice by me: it is simply how I am.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>I’m doing an assignment as part of my masters degree (in Information) that asks us to look at particular “hobby” or past-time..."

 

In order to avoid embarrassment in the halls of academe where, presumably, people know better, someone who's going for a master's degree should know that the expression is pastime, not "past-time" (the word, a slight contraction, meaning what one does to pass the time...).

 

Pastime; I strongly recommend that you spell it thusly in your thesis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like most people I started watching movies as a kid, usually watching tv with my father. As I grew older I saw more films, gained a greater appreciation for some of the "classics" , now with the internet and a site like this one I can really learn a lot about the films and the people who made them. For me its just a hobby, the films entertain me. I do presently know a lot more than the average person about the older movies, does that make me a "film buff" ? I guess, but just a "skilled amateur at best. I must say I know loads more about the "old" movies than the more current stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> In order to avoid embarrassment in the halls of academe where, presumably, people know better, someone who's going for a master's degree should know that the expression is pastime, not "past-time" (the word, a slight contraction, meaning what one does to pass the time...). Pastime; I strongly recommend that you spell it thusly in your thesis.

 

In your haste to reply to the original poster, you replied to the wrong poster.

 

Instead of spending so much time correcting folks for the use of the grammar they use, why not concentrate on sending your reply to the correct person instead. In this case her user name is Julie Ess.

 

Message to Julie.......

 

I am sorry I have not responded yet to your post. I will be doing so shortly. But I also have to apologize for certain members of the board who feel obligated to point out every little grammar mistake people make around here. Apparently this person WAS in academia as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I watch movies at a ferocious rate from all over the last 100 years. Last year I saw around 967 films. It seems what I'm trying to do is to create a world that doesn't exist in real life. My stepfather is 40 years older than I am, so a lot of his knowledge of films was sort of passed down to me. He would also take me to odd movies for a kid around 10 to 14, (Robert Altman's A Wedding, Manhattan, Murder By Decree, The Last Wave, Raging Bull, Etc.) I also remember being completely floored by Star Wars

 

 

 

 

 

Don't worry about spelling mistakes. On one of my grad school papers I mispelled Wal Mart. Just keep using spellcheck and keep a dictionary handy. Also on group projects make sure you do enough work or your partners will be mad at you. Good luck at school.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}

> certain members of the board who feel obligated to point out every little grammar mistake people make around here.

 

I feel very fortunate that person has never critiqued my posts. I know my grammar must be atrocious and my word selection horrendous.

 

Curiously one of my books on English grammar lists "past time" as a grievous error and one of my books lists "past-time" as an acceptable variant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh, forget it, I've changed my mind upon reflection. We're here to talk TCM and movies, not other posters. An admitted error that I will try to avoid in the future.

 

By the way, this is not a judgment of your post either. You happen to be one of my favorite posters.

 

Edited by: clore on Jan 31, 2012 7:54 AM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>How did this particular interest begin for you, and how has it developed since then?

 

As a kid my interest in movies began by watching them on TV, either Saturday or after school weekdays. By high school age, I was skipping classes to catch screenings of pre-codes & silents at the Eastman House. I quickly learned the value of "real film viewed with an audience" experience.

Cable has exposed me to many more movies, but finding local classic screenings has become my "niche" interest.

 

>If you were to think of your interest in films as a ?career? at what stage would you be at?

 

Not to harp too much on the grammar issue, but I "be at" the mature stage where I can really pick & choose my "roles".

 

>How did you go about seeking information and rounding out your film knowledge, and what did you do with that information once you had it?

 

Attending screenings and discussing/listening to others has helped the most in rounding out my film knowledge, but I also very much enjoy reading books about classic Hollywood.

It's plain to see I am passing this love to other members of my family. They look forward to their own "private screenings" of my recommendations and even attend classic Film Festivals with me.

 

>How long have you considered yourself a film-buff? Do you think this interest will continue to further develop in the future?

 

I've only considered myself a film buff recently, when I realized most people don't even know names like Zasu Pitts or Thelma Todd. People within my circle of friends & family look to me as the authority, while I look to my film collector friends.

 

>Can you think of a time when your interest in film was at an ?all time high?? (Or is it currently at an all time high?)

 

I think my interest is always piqued by discovering something great, whether a new film or old one. "Discovering something great" happens less frequently as time goes on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's like the old joke about the teacher going to a pupil's home to see his mother and the pupil answers the door...

 

"Is your mother home Ted?"

"Nah, my mother ain't home."

Ted. your grammar!"

"Nah, my grammar ain't home either."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, Julie. Like some of the others, I always like to see young people developing an appreciation for classic films and for films in general. Your project sounds interesting, particularly its focus on the flow of information, how it's received and how it's passed on. I guess I'm not really filling out your "questionaire", but I have a suggestion.about the context in which you'll be discussing the "career" or hobby of being a film buff. The nature of the "flow" of information in regard to film has changed over the years and continues to change. For many years, the only way to see a particular film was to actually go park yourself in a theater when it came to your town. After time, there was a practice of rereleasing films which had been of particular interest to audiences, so that they'd have another opportunity to see them (and the distributor could make more money). There were also opportunities to see films which were rented by various civic and church groups to be shown in local halls and, of course, the military provided showings for servicemembers all over the world. Second-run houses would often keep films alive after their initial run. Private collectors began to obtain prints of favorite or historically important films, either retired release prints or 16mm copies. Film societies and film series began to offer their members and the public an opportunity to see rare films and schools and universities began to offer courses on film study for credit. Television was from the beginning an important outlet for classic film, but it's important to remember that in those days of early television, the "information" of films was constantly diluted by the "information" of commercial advertising. It wasn't until the introduction of home video and home taping that the possibility of watching commercial-free films at home became a reality, though these prints were often not first-generation and were "reformatted to fit your screen", so that the information of the films themselves was subtly (or unsubtly) altered. The introduction of cable TV to many homes was roughly simultaneous with the rise of home video and both advanced the flow of information drastically. Technological advances have incrementally increased the ways in which the "information" of films can be distributed and the places and devices to which they can be distributed. Which is a long-winded way of saying that you should probably note that public access to this information has changed, as well as the quality of the information itself. The "career" of being a film buff wasn't always possible in the modern sense, though I imagine that enthusiasm for films has been constant. In the past, there was much more legwork involved in being a film buff than there is now. Your question about what you do with the information once you have it is a good one and it seems you're well on your way to answering it yourself. Best of luck with your project, Julie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...