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Blu Ray Discs


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Why should I buy Blu Ray Discs? Example, I have The Adventures of Robin Hood remaster Dvd from a few years back. Do I really need a Blu Ray version? Same applies to many of my other favorites.Money of course is an issue. I don't have a Blu Ray player, but can use my sons Playstation 3 as one.Note I am the only one in the family that buys DVDS. I like the old films. New films we just rent them, or get it off our cable. Thanks!

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Because they have nearly 3 times the resolution of standard DVD's. I just got the new "Meet Me in St. Louis" Bluray and it is as if my eyes have never seen it before. You can see detail in the wallpaper and fabrics that were never visible before. Blurays are spoiling me. I can hardy look at my old "SD" DVD's anymore.

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I too don't care for blu ray, as I think DVD gives a super picture and I have well over 2000 DVDs and have been getting them since 1997.

Blu Ray is just a gimmick ,all it is is to make you have to go out and buy the same movies you allready have on DVD and, DVD has always had a great picture and, of course it depends on your TV settings to give you a great picture and the TV I have is a Sony, one of their best they had made in 2006, and, it has the 16X9 feature where when you set it for this, the picture quality is outstanding and looks like HDTV as you do not see any of the scan lines at all, they are gone!! So, it all depends on how you see your DVDs on your TV and the settings. Also, having a DVD player that is a higher end model also helps and so, for me, DVD is the best and of course others feel the same as I do about DVD. blu ray is also known as blu crap, to those who don't care for blu ray,and there are many who don't care for blu ray at all.

 

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I have TWICE that many DVD's I've been collecting for the same amount of time.

 

Nonsense to the "gimmick" comment...as someone else pointed out, Blu-ray is technically SUPERIOR to standard DVD format. Blu-ray has three times the resolution (and colors look much better also), and it can also (usually) contains a superior sound format as well.

 

I haven't bothered simply replacing ALL discs I possibly can with Blu-ray simply due to the quantity I already own...but there's a chosen few I HAVE replaced with Blu-ray because I wanted that superior image quality. Any time I go to add a movie I don't already own into my colelction, I decide whether I really need to have a Blu-ray version or not. It's not just a question of money, because many Blu-ray discs can often be found for LESS than the regular DVD version, but also because I have one Blu-ray player and several regular DVD players. A couple of movies I recently watched on regular DVD, and then I also just got the Blu-ray version, which I decided was worth it for the particular color and images on both films...and it was like watching these movies for the first time. I immediately noticed the improved image quality and the better colors.

 

Like it or not, eventually Blu-ray (or some more superior format in the future) WILL replace regular DVD's. It's called advancement in technology. Blu-ray is advanced and superior.

 

As far as how something LOOKS on your tv...it partly depends on the tv you have and the settings for the image, and also the disc player you're watching on. Many DVD players these days have an "upconvert" function which simulates the actual HD image one gets on Blu-ray, and makes the regular SD (standard definition) look like it's HD (high definition).

 

I've never heard the term "blu crap", but it obviously sounds like a phrase used by morons who don't know any better.

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> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote} Blu-ray has three times the resolution (and colors look much better also), and it can also (usually) contains a superior sound format as well.

Actually, it is up to 6 times the resolution.

 

To the OP, you might want to check out the DVD/Blu-ray section we have on this message board:

[f-362]

 

As to classicstarlets assertion "blu ray is also known as blu crap, to those who don't care for blu ray,and there are many who don't care for blu ray at all"...that sounds like sour grapes. It's not known as blu crap to the millions of Blu-ray owners. Actually, it really sounds like the opinion of someone who is just sore that Blu may replace DVD and that little classic is released on DVD any longer (but you can't blame Blu for that; classic film DVD sales were dying before Blu came along.

I bet some said that DVD was known as "DVD crap" to people who had invested in their VHS collection.

 

btw, blu is a billion dollar industry.

 

Blu does give a superior picture to DVD (but that always depends on the original print it is coming from).

 

Here are some comparison shots done by dvdbeaver.com from Zulu. Unfortunately, due to space limitations on the TCM message boatds, you are unable to enjoy the finer details available in a larger image.

 

DVD:

 

6803321661_5c00daab44_z.jpg

 

Blu-ray:

 

6803321835_a74de84822_z.jpg

 

DVD:

 

6803321407_cb7683cc44_z.jpg

 

Blu-ray:

 

6803321505_85cc6a574d_z.jpg

 

 

And here are a couple of screen shots from Ben-Hur:

 

DVD:

 

6803476269_e6eee33f35_z.jpg

 

Blu-ray:

 

6803476275_b1a8909bdf_z.jpg

 

Blu also comes with the capability of doing a lot more things than DVD as far as extras go.

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I really don't understand why some people are so hostile towards Blu-ray. You don't have to buy anything you don't want to, Blu-ray players play DVDs and will continue to do so. DVDs are still widely manufactured and sold. The transition has been far smoother and more palatable than any prior video format - you're not forced to do anything. Blu-ray player and media prices have dropped faster than DVD players and media did a decade ago (last year I bought a region free Blu-ray player, at a Best Buy store, not an etailer, for $100 - you couldn't do that in 2001 with DVD - and you can get two Ozu films in high quality HD from the UK for less than $20 - an impossibility for one film on DVD in 2001.) The quality standards of the format improved with greater speed than DVD did (have you ever seen the early DVDs? They really don't hold up so well.)

 

So here I am, still happy with my collection of DVDs which I still use on a weekly basis, completely free to buy whatever films I already own on DVD on Blu-ray when they come out, able to get many things I don't have in the very best video quality we've ever had, and still able to buy a plethora of DVDs of films that aren't or may never be available on Blu-ray.

 

Sounds like a great, perfectly fair deal to me!

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I'm not completely sold on BluRay disks yet, but when my 15 year old Sony DVD player craps out (soon), I'll be replacing it with a Sony BluRay player. The library now carries BR DVDs, so I'll watch them & let you know what I think.

 

Somehow, the sharpness of "seeing the wallpaper patterns" seems weird because that's not how your eyes "see". Film is so much lovelier than digital because it "sees" like your eyes "see"- backrounds are out of focus. I also find colors often look "cooked in PhotoShop" in a BR image, not unlike HD (yuk). What will happen to subtle colors orchestrated by the art director in films like *Black Narcissus?* Will they pop out like *Pleasantville?*

 

Hopefully, those uprezzing classic films bear all this in mind and don't make them look like cartoons. I have a feeling I'm going to enjoy BR disks, but won't bother to actually spend more for one, nor replace my DVD collection.

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Video is probably always going to be somewhat different from projected film, but a Blu-ray at 24fps is getting pretty close. I'd say the detail and the visible grain levels of good projection are very similar and the motion of the images, although aflicted with a little more motion blur than you might see on projected film, is closer to film than what the old SD NTSC 2:3 pulldown could provide.

 

Black Narcissus and the Red Shoes truly look exceptional on Blu-ray, two of the very best discs out there, old or new, I think you'll be satisfied when you see them. When people point out increased sharpness in textures in the image, it's always relative to the film; if it's handled right it shouldn't be unnatural, always true to what's on the film (and a good generation film of any age is of higher visual quality than what a Blu-ray can provide - the Blu-ray, from a 2K or 4K telecine scan, is just presenting more of what's on the film.)

 

But an important fact of life with Blu-ray and HDTV is that the user has to be proactive with the settings on their TV and player, much more so than with a Tube. Setting the sharpness down to zero (no artificial enhancement) is an absolute must, turn off edge enhancement, turn off noise reduction, turn off settings like "Motion Flow" or "Auto Motion Plus" (which are separate from the 120hz - or higher - refresh/frame rate that they're always advertised with), and find the right balance between the brightness & contrast settings and the backlight of the TV (and of course slight color adjustment.) It takes some doing but when you get it right it's absolutely worth all of the trouble.

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Thanks for that great explanation, Jonas. This was actually a topic of discussion among my RL friends last evening.

I was told the purpose of BluRay is not really to "cook" or alter the image as much as to present the density of pixel quality my big TV can handle.

I also noticed in filmlover's comparative photos the whites aren't whiter and the blacks aren't blacker, as I see in high definition - a look I really dislike.

The contrast in FL photos actually seem to be less contrast-y in hues, enriching the colors - kind of reminding me of the look of Robin Hood (which always seems to be just a tad bit sepia) or a late 40's Fox musical.

 

It's going to be interesting viewing a BR when I've seen the actual 35mm projection... like 2001 A Space Odyssy!

I've kept the last paragraph of your post so I remember to set up my TV when I get the BR player.

Thanks!

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> {quote:title=2847 wrote:}{quote}Why should I buy Blu Ray Discs? Example, I have The Adventures of Robin Hood remaster Dvd from a few years back. Do I really need a Blu Ray version? Same applies to many of my other favorites.Money of course is an issue. I don't have a Blu Ray player, but can use my sons Playstation 3 as one.Note I am the only one in the family that buys DVDS. I like the old films. New films we just rent them, or get it off our cable. Thanks!

 

Blu-ray is undeniably superior to DVD, but the real answer to your question depends on your tastes, viewing environment, and your equipment. Obviously, if you don't have an HDTV, you would see little, if any difference. If you have a small HDTV, and sit far away from it, you wouldn't see any difference. If you have a large HDTV, and sit relatively close to it, you will see a world of difference, with a 1080p Blu-ray disc.

 

So, if you have a HDTV of say, 50" or larger, and don't sit more than 10' away, Blu-ray is worth having. If this is the case, when you buy something new, buy it in Blu-ray. Don't feel you have to replace your whole collection, but maybe buy Blu-ray discs of a few of your very favorites, if the BD releases get good reviews.

 

If you can buy a really good Blu-ray player, they will do really good upscaling of DVDs, making them look better than they do on other equipment. If you have $499 to spend on a reference quality Blu-Ray player, that is as good or better than players costing far more, you would be amazed at how good your SD DVDs can look, and your Blu-ray discs would also be stunning, assuming you have a large HDTV. If one can afford it, here's the player I recommend:

 

http://www.oppodigital.com/blu-ray-bdp-93/blu-ray-BDP-93-Features.aspx

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Hi, Valentine,

 

While it is true an Oppo still costs $400+, it should be pointed out that most excellent Blu players sell for less than $100 now. You don't want to scare those away who think that Blu players are still several hundred. And you can even get some that are 3D ready if you ever get a 3DTV for aout $130-175.

 

My personal recommendation are Sony players.

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I was just in Best Buy yesterday and saw two 3D TVs set up for comparison. I took a look at both....meh. It sort of looks like a "pop-up book" effect-flat images standing on different planes. I think viewing 3D movies might be tiring after awhile.

 

>My personal recommendation are Sony players.

 

Sonys are good quality workhorses reasonably priced. My Sony VCR is 15 y/o and still works, although I don't use it. My 10 y/o DVD player cost around $130 but is getting crotchety. I am looking forward to replacing it with a BR soon & join your world FL-I think we have the same brand-loyal set-up.

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I have an old-fashioned 30 inch standard CRT TV. I intend to keep it until it dies and replace it with the cheapest thing I can find. My main interest is in early talkies and precodes and films up through the film noir era. Blu Ray isn't going to do anything for the kind of films I like. If you have good eyesight - I really don't anymore - and like more modern films then I could see why you might want to upgrade to Blu Ray.

 

As for me, I'll buy a Blu Ray player when my DVD player dies if that is all that is on the market at the time.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}I was just in Best Buy yesterday and saw two 3D TVs set up for comparison. I took a look at both....meh. It sort of looks like a "pop-up book" effect-flat images standing on different planes. I think viewing 3D movies might be tiring after awhile.

There are two versions of 3DTVs right now. One uses an "active" version and the other is a "passive" version. When I first saw 3DTVs in store, it was always the active version, which require you to have slightly-heavy, battery-operated glasses. It has a shutter system where one eye of the glasses is dark while the other shows through, then vice versa. I find them to be a pain, literally. One is the weight, and after a few minutes I get a headache or feel dizzy after. Not for me.

 

I had shown no interest after those experiences until I was in Costco a few months ago and they were demonstrating an LG brand passive 3D TV. Passive uses glasses like you see in some theaters, that weigh about the same as a pair of sunglasses and look basically the same. I put them on...and I was knocked out by the 3D. It was a demo disc of Under the Sea, I think. There was one fish that "came out of the screen" so far that I did what people do in theaters do when it is excellent 3D, and that is I tried reaching for it. And I also felt no dizziness or headaches after several minutes of watching.

 

I am sold on the passive version and hope to get one someday. And the glasses only cost about 4 for $10 (though they already have 4 free ones witht he HDTV, so it is doubtful you would ever need more). Active ones cost about $50-$100 each, and that is just for one.

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Yes filmlover I was responding to the original post. But I don't think one should rush out and get every single new blu ray when the original dvd was just fine- in the case of "2001" the blu ray is truly amazing in capturing the detail of the image.

 

Edited by: joefilmone on Feb 5, 2012 5:18 PM

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> {quote:title=joefilmone wrote:}{quote}Yes filmlover I was responding to the original post. But I don't think one should rush out and get every single new blu ray when the original dvd was just fine.

I agree. That's why I usually read reviews that compare them when they can. The best side-by-side image comparison (and also for reviews of DVD-only titles) is dvdbeaver.com, in my opinion:

 

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/new.htm

 

Also good for Blu reviews (and other information) are:

 

http://www.blu-ray.com/

 

http://www.highdefdigest.com/

 

Often, though, I do end up getting the Blu version and selling the DVD.

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}Hi, Valentine,

>

> While it is true an Oppo still costs $400+, it should be pointed out that most excellent Blu players sell for less than $100 now. You don't want to scare those away who think that Blu players are still several hundred. And you can even get some that are 3D ready if you ever get a 3DTV for aout $130-175.

>

> My personal recommendation are Sony players.

 

No, I definitely didn't mean to scare 2847 away. They said that they already had access to s Sony Playstation, for BD playback, so they don't really have to buy anything, to play BDs.

 

I described the Oppo as a reference grade player, indicating that it wasn't an economy player, and did say IF you can afford $499. Perhaps I should have added that there are plenty of decent players for much lower prices. One thing about the Oppo is that its upscaling is far superior to cheaper (and many more expensive) players. So, one's collection of DVDs will look much better on the Oppo.

 

I don't have 3DTV yet, but agree that passive systems are the way to go. I'd bet that the demo film you saw was *Deep Sea 3D*, narrated by Johnny Depp - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0424942/ That was the first 3D film I saw when our local multiplex went 3D, and it is still one of the very best 3D films I have seen. I was afraid the seaweed was going to tickle my nose!

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> {quote:title=joefilmone wrote:}{quote}Blu ray gives you better sound and depending on the original source material the image can be better.

Naturally, flaws and imperfections in an older source material or imperfect transfer makes the imperfections stand out even moreso.

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> {quote:title=calvinnme wrote:}{quote}Blu Ray isn't going to do anything for the kind of films I like. If you have good eyesight - I really don't anymore - and like more modern films then I could see why you might want to upgrade to Blu Ray.

Well, as far as many early sound films only exist in multi-generation duplicate elements, maybe, but it's completely false that films from that era won't benefit from higher video and audio resolution. Even the problematic ones I think improve with the lower amount of video and sound compression and better motion

 

If you personally have no use for Blu-ray, that's fine - a lot of the films you like may never come out on the format - but everytime someone says something like this it only makes it more difficult to get any older film out on the format.

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This whole discussion is interesting, but what it all boils down to is whether or not one wants to enter the high definition sweepstakes or not.

 

In my case, I wanted to have HD channels to watch. At the time I did not have an HDTV, but eventually two years ago I finally purchased one.

 

The TV I bought was a Sony 42" HDTV 1080p resolution. Upon further investigation I decided to purchase an upconverting Panasonic Blu-Ray disc player. I have well over 500 standard def dvd's. I wanted an upconverted dvd player to help enhance those standard def dvds.

 

As far as purchasing Blu-Ray discs, I have bought two so far. North By Northwest and Star Trek (2009). After watching both I decided to put on hold any further purchasing of Blu-Ray discs until either the prices started to come down or in my present situation I obtain a full-time job. Purchasing can be delayed.

 

As far as replacing all of my std. def DVDs with Blu-Rays, I do not believe that I will be able to afford to do that, plus I do not believe that all of the std. def dvds I have are available in Blu-Ray yet.

 

As far as I am concerned, playing std. def dvds on my Blu-Ray player is great. The enhancements make watching the older dvds almost like seeing the films in a theater.

 

So for now or until I become a winner on Publishers Clearing House, the purchase of additional dvds will have to wait.

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fxrey, many classics on Blu-ray are relatively cheap. Here are some examples on Amazon:

 

Music Man $12.99

Wizard of Oz $12.49

Gone With the Wind $12.99

The Searchers $7.49

Psycho $15.99

Treasure of Sierra Madre $12.49

Maltese Falcon $12.49

True Grit $14.99

The Cowboys $9.49

Bonnie and Clyde $10.94

Bullitt $7.49

Caine Mutiny $14.99

Cool Hand Luke $12.99

Dirty Dozen $7.99

Forbidden Planet $7.99

Gigi $12.99

Guns of Navarone $11.99

Horse Soldiers $11.99

It's A Mad....World $13.99

Magnificent Seven $9.99

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly $12.49

North by Northwest $12.49

Dr. No $9.99

Goldfinger $9.99

From Russia With Love $9.99

Thunderball $9.99

 

to name just a few

 

 

 

 

And if you look around, Costco has some great Blu prices:

 

Notorious $9.99

Spellbound $9.99

Rebecca $9.99

The Apartment $9.99

Midnight Cowboy $9.99

Annie Hall $9.99

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}This whole discussion is interesting, but what it all boils down to is whether or not one wants to enter the high definition sweepstakes or not.

>

> As far as replacing all of my std. def DVDs with Blu-Rays, I do not believe that I will be able to afford to do that, plus I do not believe that all of the std. def dvds I have are available in Blu-Ray yet.

1. What it really boils down to is that eventually everything will be HD and one won't have a "choice" any longer....because SD will be gone. It's called advancements in technology.

 

2. You're right...and it's never been suggested that you should replace all of your SD discs with Blu-ray discs, even if everything was out on Blu-ray. The superior format is simply there...it's not a requirement (not yet, anyway).

 

I just got a Blu-ray player last year and so far only have 10 movies on Blu-ray (4 of those are in a Star Trek set), and I'd say only 2 of those were meant as replacements for what I had previously on either DVD or laserdisc (yes, I still have a bunch of those). Still have all my Trek movies on regular DVD...won't ever get rid of those...but the two I mentioned were meant to replace what I either had or didn't previously own, simply because they were movies I felt benefitted from the superior detail and color of Blu-ray's presentation. There may eventually be a chosen few I will replace my DVD's with Blu-ray discs, and certainly many to come which I don't yet own but will decide at the time if I want/need it on Blu-ray or regular DVD.

 

Look at when the music/audio industry came up with the CD format....there were a LOT of people who still hung onto their vinyl LP and tape collections (at least until such time as some of those were worn out and they went to replace them...and then they had to get replacements on CD).

 

There's even still people who have hung onto their VHS collections (I still have quite a few)...but as their VHS tapes wore out, they had to replace with DVD (where possible).

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