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31 Days of Oscar Complaint


kd4qjs
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Years ago each movie/short/cartoon during Oscar month was preceded with a display saying why the movie was either nominated or had won an Oscar...including for costuming, direction, etc. I never understood why this was dropped. Now this year there seems no rhyme or reason why movies are shown on any given day. What does "The Champ" and "The Invisible Woman" have in common? It's just like watching any other month---nothing Oscar special anymore.It's just a guessing game.

 

Edited by: kd4qjs on Feb 3, 2012 3:00 PM

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Beery as lead actor was nomnated for The Champ. Invisible Woman nominated for visual or special effects, or soemthing like that. For some reason I thought all movies during Oscars month had to have won an Academy Award for something. Not just be nominated. Looks like I was off the mark there ?:|

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Well, the short answer is blocks of films during the 31 days share a geographic location in common -- a country or ocean where they are all commonly set (either in whole or in part). For instance, tonight's block is heralded The Oscar Goes to India, and the line-up is Gandhi, A Passage to India, The Rains Came (a TCM premier, I think) and the Jungle Book.

The Champ (which won Oscars for Wallace Beery -- Best Actor, tied with Fredric March for Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde) and Frances Marion (Best original story) and "The Invisible Woman" (an Oscar nominee for John P. Fulton's special effects) were the tail end of a block with the common setting of Mexico. (This also included Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Wild Bunch, BTW), only I confess to some confusion. I didn't sense that there was very much of "The Invisible Woman" that was set in Mexico! I think there was a brief shot of Oscar Holmolka in which his character was supposed to be south of the border and looking to get back into the USA, but the connection with Mexico was tentative at best. Oh well, it's still kind of a cute idea for a festival, and I think the whole "Oscar goes to" tag is quite clever, especially since we're apparently not allowed to think of Oscar winners as 'winners' any more -- just one of five people the Oscar happens to go home with in any given year. (Whatever.) Personally, my two cents is I think Meryl Streep is overdue and I hope she *wins* an Oscar this year. So there. Chuck rocks at my head, or whatever you please, but that's my opinion.

 

Anyhoo...I was going to bring this up later, but since the original poster jumped in I'll echo the sentiment now. It is true that, for many years, all films (and short subjects) shown during the 31 Days of Oscar festival were prefaced with a short screen and musical fanfare, detailing what categories each entry was nominated for, and what wins (if any) the film received. This was discontinued about five years ago. I have no idea why, but I think it is an incredibly stupid thing for the network to have done. (It has been mentioned periodically on the message boards as a criticism, and there have been occasional requests to bring the screens back, and a complete absence of any response from network administrators, to the best of my knowledge.)

 

Of course, I understand that all the awards information is available on TCM.com, and I have my laptop handy at all times during the festival so I can look up the information I want, but I think it is at best shortsighted for the network to not provide the information on-screen for those who may not have access to a computer 24-7. It's not like it is a huge consumer of time to run the information.

Moreover, I am extremely irritated by the fact that there is NO information provided by TCM anywhere as to the years of release for the short subjects which are airing during the 31 days. You really have to dig in order to find out, for instance, which of the Robert Benchley/Pete Smith shorts were Oscar winners, and what their competition was, or whether the Laurel and Hardy short The Music Box was an Oscar winner in 1932 (it was) or whether that absolutely brilliant live-action highway safety short "Stop, Look, and Listen" (if you haven't seen this, please be on the lookout for it!) was named best short subject in its year of competition -- which is something like 1968, although my memory fails as I type this, and I didn't get the info when the short began airing for the first time this month, of course. (For the record, Stop Look and Listen didn't win an Oscar; God knows why.)

 

Although I find the tendancy to criticize TCM on these message boards is much overdone, this is a complaint which I think extremely valid and which I do wish somebody at the network would take notice of and correct for 2013. At the very least, it would be nice to see the complaint acknowledged, and receive a posting from somebody official as to why the staffers at TCM seem to feel the running of the information at the head of each movie is something they feel no need to do.

 

Apart from that, guys and gals, at TCM the festival's been great. Been enjoying the movies immensely, and am so looking forward to seeing "A Passage to India" tonight. It's always been a favorite of mine.

Cordially,

Dan

 

 

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I think they should have some first sound films of great stars who made the transition, ie. Garbo in her first talkie, Anna Christie, was nominated for best actress oscar (she was also nominated for her second talkie, Romance, the same year. That would have been something interesting to casual fans of TCM and Garbo's too, but there is obviously no imagination in the works this year!

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{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}kd4gis wrote:{font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}Years ago each movie/short/cartoon during Oscar month was preceded with a display saying why the movie was either nominated or had won an Oscar...including for costuming, direction, etc. I never understood why this was dropped.{font}{font:}{color:black}{font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}Thank you very much for this post. I miss the award/nomination info as well for my own information as well as others. It showed that even lesser quality films had something or someone's performance to offer fans. What an inspiration to newcomers to the business this is. Always do your best no matter what you're stuck in; it will get you noticed. {font}

 

 

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*"It's just like watching any other month---nothing Oscar special anymore.It's just a guessing game."* - kd4qjs

 

Yes. It is disappointing to many that the film's lead-ins don't include the nomination information any longer. So you are not alone.

 

As a consolation, TCM does provide that information - and a helluva lot more - at its "31 Days Of Oscar" website.

http://www.tcm.com/2012/31days/

The nominations and wins are included in the pages dedicated to each of the films being shown during the Festival. This year the site also includes special materials related to the films which have been acquired from the Academy's own archives and a link to the Academy's Oscar website.

 

With a travel theme, the 2012 website is especially fun. Visitors navigate the site using a passport and a vintage suitcase. As each day passes, the "31 Days" suitcase acquires more and more travel labels, as does the visitor's passport. The suitcase even finds itself transported to new locations like a Colorado creek, a Florida beach or the Canadian northwoods.

 

I hope everyone checks it out. (Perhaps during a "slow spot" during one of tonght's epics from India.) And make sure you register for the sweepstakes. The Grand Prize is the featured suitcase and all the "contents" inside. What is inside is kept a "mystery" but the contents are said to be worth over $1000.

http://shop.tcm.com/register.php?sweepstakes=TCMOscarSweeps02012012&ecid=PRF-TCM-100200&pa=PRF-TCM-100200

 

There are "secondary prizes" too.

 

Travel safely, everyone!

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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>Years ago each movie/short/cartoon during Oscar month was preceded with a display saying why the movie was either nominated or had won an Oscar...including for costuming, direction, etc. I never understood why this was dropped.

 

Everything changes.

 

Cars used to be all metal. Fenders and bumpers used to be heavy metal rather than light plastic. Cars were a block long and had room for 6 people inside. Gas was .25 cents a gallon.

 

You want a TCM iPhone App? Then you gotta get rid of something else in order for the company to pay to have the staff work on it.

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Why do you suppose they spend so much time designing a fancy Flash Player website, when we really need just plain information about the movies?

 

It seems like a waste of money and staff time to me. And do they not realize that not every one of us is on high-band internet hookups or high speed cable? Do they not realize that a lot of people live in rural areas and still have dial-ups? There are many towns in the US other than Los Angeles, New York, and Atlanta, and many people live outside of any city.

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Well, as I pointed out in my previous post, the notion that all the information is available on the 31 Days of Oscar site, (which is an excellent site, by the way, I quite agree with Kyle about that!) is not true. There is no information provided on line about the various short subjects which are being screened all this month. I'm not sure how widespread this knowledge is, but these are also all Oscar winners and nominees. Years ago, all short subjects also were duly outfitted with the information screen which provided their year of release, and whether they were winners or merely nominees in the short subject category.

I've yet to hear any rationale from anybody official at TCM as to why this information is no longer provided at the outset of each film and short subject during the 31 Days festival. If there's some good reason for the omission, I'd like to know what it is. Otherwise, this is one 'change' that TCM should change back, starting in 2013. Movie buffs and folks who hope to win an Oscar trivia contest some day deserve the consideration, please!

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>I've yet to hear any rationale from anybody official at TCM as to why this information is no longer provided at the outset of each film and short subject during the 31 Days festival. If there's some good reason for the omission, I'd like to know what it is.

 

They are not going to tell you. It's a matter of budget, lack of time, and too much trouble.

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Hi, Fred.

 

With all due respect, I fail to see how much time or budget resource it would consume to have a TCM web administrator post a few line on this issue one way or the other.

My suggestion would run something like this:

 

A few years ago, the programming department made a decison to remove the visual preambles listing nominations and awards received by the films and short subjects during the 31 Days of Oscar festival. After receiving feedback from a number of our concerned viewers and fans, this information will be restored at the start of films and short subjects in February 2013. We sincerely appreciate the comments from our devoted viewers, and are always working to make information about the movies more accessible to all.

p.s. We also will be screening "Anna Christie" and "Romance" early in 2013's Oscar salute because we love johnbabe and want him to be happy, and we will diligently search for all film titles starring Joel McCrea that are Oscar contenders and get those on the air as well, for the sake of Miss Wonderly, who keeps writing us all those stirring poems.

 

OK, the last graph was just me funnin.' Don't get mad at me, john and Miss Wonderly. It;s been a long time since I've seen "Romance" and I wouldn't mind having another pass at it, actually. And, apart from Foreign Correspondant, I don't know if there are any other MaCrea films that received Oscar attention, although God knows it seems like there should be!

 

 

 

 

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*"...I think it is at best shortsighted for the network to not provide the information on-screen for those who may not have access to a computer 24-7. It's not like it is a huge consumer of time to run the information."* - DuryeaForHollywood

 

Yes. The ten seconds of screen time for the nominations "card" is negligible. But the amount of time necessary for the preparation of the material is not. The creation of the nomination cards, assembling and arranging them for use and then getting them attached to the proper films and then on the channel has to be a big undertaking. "The job" would be very time-consuming and would cover multiple departments - including some that do not work exclusively for TCM (They also work for TNT, TBS, etc.). But the work would have to be paid for out of the TCM budget.

 

Five or six years ago, TCM regularly invested in a large variety of new materials for use on the channel. There was a special "music video" created every month promoting the month's highlights. Other little whimsical promos would show up every few months. (Remember the Living Graffiti pieces?) Apparently the funds for many of those kinds of add-ons dried up. Or maybe it was sacrificed in an effort to preserve funds for the programming departments. But that last is just a guess on my part. Whatever the actual reasoning, the honest answer to the missing Informational Cards probably comes down to lack of funding.

 

It is true that TCM has a "new for 2012" promo for "31 Days Of Oscar" that appears on the channel. But this piece also functions as a commercial. It runs on other cable channels. And in the past it was even shown in movie theaters. The expense of that promo can be pushed off onto the Marketing Departments which usually have lots of money to spend.

 

As to the short shrift the short subjects get, I think it is an editorial or style issue that keeps them out of the micro-site. While all the films are grouped thematically, like the travel idea this year, the shorts are not programmed in that same manner. The "London Blitz" short is being seen in the middle of "India Night" as is a Pete Smith Specialty on U.S. war preparations. Unfortunately the non-theme shorts don't "fit" alongside the Globe-trotting features.

 

The "31 Days..." microsite does have a printable schedule in a pdf format that everyone can download, print out and easily annotate with material and information from the website - like nominations and wins.

 

I bet the "wish list" of projects of the TCM staff is as long as that of any regular viewer of the channel. The "On-Air" department would love to be able to create new "This Month" pieces once again. Creating materials for TCM is a lot more "fun" than creating promos for reruns of "Everyone Loves Raymond". But the costs are just too high (I hear licensing film clips and music has become very expensive) for a channel that isn't supported by advertising.

 

There are 27 films premiering on TCM this month - from *State Fair* (1933) to *Harry And Tonto* to *Good Will Hunting*. And I am sure none of them were inexpensive, relatively speaking. All were probably pricier than a title from the former Turner Library - save for *Gone With The Wind* perhaps. But after 18 years, it is important to invest in new titles so that the "31 Days..." event can satisfy the long-time viewers too.

 

It likely all comes down to creating a hierarchy of priorities on where the money is spent - with film acquisition at the top. Everything else is subject to negotiations and compromise.

 

This month's fantasy of world travel runs up against the reality of the costs involved to make it happen. TCM, and its great Oscar itnerary this month, has created a memorable trip for us Globe-trotting "tourists". And if we have to create our own "Frommer's Guide" of Oscar info as a traveller's aid, it is a small price to pay.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Feb 3, 2012 9:30 PM

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*"Why do you suppose they spend so much time designing a fancy Flash Player website, when we really need just plain information about the movies?"* - FCD

 

Here ya go, Fred. You can have your Non-Flash info and eat it too.

 

_February 1st_

*Florida* and *Pennsylvania*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455905%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-1-2012.html

 

_February 2nd_

*Canada* and *Mexico*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455906%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-2-2012.html

 

_February 3rd_

*Mexico*, *Colorado* and *India*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455907%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-3-2012.html

 

_February 4th_

*England*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455908%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-4-2012.html

 

_February 5th_

*England*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455909%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-5-2012.html

 

_February 6th_

*Eastern Europe* and *The Netherlands*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455910%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-6-2012.html

 

_February 7th_

*The Atlantic Ocean* and *Germany*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455911%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-7-2012.html

 

_February 8th_

*Germany*, *Scotland* and *The Midwest*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455912%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-8-2012.html

 

_February 9th_

*The Midwest* and Texas*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455913%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-9-2012.html

 

_February 10th_

*Texas*, *Nevada* and *Wyoming*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455914%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-10-2012.html

 

_February 11th_

*New York*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455915%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-11-2012.html

 

_February 12th_

*New York*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455916%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-12-2012.html

 

_February 13th_

*The Great Plains* and *Greece*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455917%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-13-2012.html

 

_February 14th_

*Italy*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455918%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-14-2012.html

 

_February 15th_

*The Pacific Ocean* and *Africa*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455919%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-15-2012.html

 

_February 16th_

*Africa* and *Russia*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455920%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-16-2012.html

 

_February 17th_

*The American South*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455921%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-17-2012.html

 

_February 18th_

*France*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455922%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-18-2012.html

 

_February 19th_

*France*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455923%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-19-2012.html

 

_February 20th_

*Ancient Rome* and *Austria*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455924%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-20-2012.html

 

_February 21st_

*The Carribean* and *South America*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455925%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-21-2012.html

 

_February 22nd_

*Washington, D.C.*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455926%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-22-2012.html

 

_February 23rd_

*The South Seas* and *Southeast Asia*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455927%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-23-2012.html

 

_February 24th_

*Australia*, *Arizona* and *New Mexico*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455928%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-24-2012.html

 

_February 25th_

*California*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455929%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-25-2012.html

 

_February 26th_

*California*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455930%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-26-2012.html

 

_February 27th_

*New England*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455931%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-27-2012.html

 

_February 28th_

*Spain*, *The French Riviera* and *The Middle East*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455932%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-28-2012.html

 

_February 29th_

*The Middle East*, *Belgium* and *China*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/456016%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-2-29-2012.html

 

_March 1st_

*Japan* and *Hawaii*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455933%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-3-1-2012.html

 

_March 2nd_

*All Over*, *Heaven* and *Space*

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/455934%7C0/Around-the-World-With-Oscar-3-2-2012.html

 

(Results found by searching the "Site" for "Around The World With Oscar")

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Hallo, Kyle:

 

Thanks for the enjoyable and insightful post. I have no idea how much of it is a literal blow-by-blow of what goes on behind the scenes at the network, but your speculations are quite plausible, and I must say the point you made hadn't occurred to me. It seems incredible that so much effortf (and expense) goes into such a simple thing, but it's undoubtedly so.

I always appreciate reading your posts, Kyle. You're clearly a most intelligent fellow who loves classic movies, and you are not afraid to state forcefully what you think, and yet you are unfailingly pleasant and well-mannered about it. Civility, alas, sees to be a vanishing commodity on message boards these days (here and everywhere), so I really must pat you on your back for what you always bring to our conversations.

 

To play devil's advocate, though. Surely there are still all the preambulatory screens from past years of the 31 Days festival sitting around somewhere, or would they have been junked wholesale when the decision was made to do away with them? This is a legitimate question, 'cause I legitimately don't know the answer. I wouldn't think staff at TCM and elsewhere would be creating 350-plus such screens year in and year out for the Oscar salute when many titles do recur from year to year.

 

At any rate, it would still be nice to hear from somebody official one way or the other. Just for the record, you know.

 

Oops, gotta break off. They're at that scene where the Indian barrister throws his papers up in the air and chants "Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Moore!" in "A Passage to India." What a strange picture this is, beautifully photographed and designed and meticulous in that David Lean tradition, but a little silly and protracted in the final act. Amazing this thing went home almost empty-handed on Oscar night, but 1984 was the Year of Amadeus, I suppose.

 

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*"Thanks for the enjoyable and insightful post."* - DuryeaForHollywood

 

And thank you for saying so. That's most kind.

 

*"... and I must say the point you made hadn't occurred to me. It seems incredible that so much effort (and expense) goes into such a simple thing, but it's undoubtedly so."*

 

There are 348 films featured in the 2012 "31 Days Of Oscar" line-up. That's a large number of individual "info title cards" to prepare. While the "material" cost of this short digital promo may be small, the time and labor necessary to create these items would likely be the biggest expense.

 

And though re-using "older" materials would be possible, there is an effort to "freshen" (or "brand") previously seen items when used during "31 Days...". The old "Star Of The Month" profile promos that are consistently replayed throughout the year (Carrie Fisher on her mother, Michael Caine on Cary Grant, etc.) even get a "new" opening to brand it with the "31 Days..." event. Same goes for the shorter "Word Of Mouth" pieces.

 

The lead-in to the short subjects is even "different" during February. Gone is the vintage film projector and latin-tinged music. It is replaced with a stylish, abstract set of floating and flipping "displays" of film clips - all set to the new music from the 2012 "commercial." (At least, I think it is new music this year. But it could be recyled from last year. I wasn't a big fan of last year's "31 Days..." promo.)

 

The visual or musical elements incorporated into the "new" lead-ins brand these pieces to the current "31 Days..." event. Such changes help reinforce the specialness of "Oscar Month" on TCM and tells the viewer that the Academy Awards is the singular focus of TCM in February.

 

So in this context, even when TCM recycles, the materials get freshened up. If the channel was to use "old" nomination title cards, they would look out of place. The last ones that I remember had a red, satin-like background. They were very stylish - but they wouldn't fit in with the present day pieces.

 

It is too bad that the channel no longer includes the nomination information before each film. Seeing how much attention the channel gives to all its materials during this month, I am sure it was not a cavalier decision to discontinue these short add-ons.

 

Anyone who has had the pleasure to meet a TCM staffer quickly learns how proud these people are of the channel. And they are very commited to the viewers (fans) of TCM. Changes to the channel that disappoint the viewers are avoided if at all possible. But not, unfortunately, "at all costs." Operating as it does on a "fixed income" of subscription fees, TCM will often have to use cost reduction as a way to balance the budget.

 

Maybe our WebAdmin friend (and television producer) Michael can give us an idea how labor intensive it would be to create the "nominations title cards" for the 348 films being shown this month. And hint at how expensive that project might be.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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> While the "material" cost of this short digital promo may be small, the time and labor necessary to create these items would likely be the biggest expense.

 

Chief,

 

In addition to the time and labor factor, it would also tie up an editing station/bay for days so that the editor could put together those 348 title info cards. That, in turn, would impact the prep and editing of materials for the months after "31 Days".

 

Being involved in something very similar at the moment, I can truthfully say it takes much longer to edit and format the material for "digital release" than people often realize.

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Could the expense of making those "lead-in" cards really be more expensive than creating a web site to provide that information? Seems to me it would take a larger staff of techno specific employees to put it together. And I go along with the arguement that not everyone can avail themselves 24/7 to a computer. It seems that other programming does that as well. Local news programs now give you 80% of a news story and finnish up by saying, "For more information on this and other news stories, go to our website...". The thing is, not only doesn't everybody have access to high-speed, broadband internet, but not everybody has a COMPUTER! If my Mother were still alive, I know SHE wouldn't have one! Bruno, the 85-year-old next door neighbor of mine doesn't. Nor do a few others in MY FAMILY alone. It is an inconsiderate and arrogant presumption for information and entertainment providers to think we will all go out and run to the store and purchase PC's and "smart phones" just in order to look up or download information it would have taken them just 20 extra seconds to provide! I don't resent the introduction of new technology, but I DO resent the practice of having it rammed down my throat.

 

Sepiatone

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>In addition to the time and labor factor, it would also tie up an editing station/bay for days so that the editor could put together those 348 title info cards.

 

That was my point that I posted earler: It's a matter of budget, lack of time, and too much trouble.

 

I worked at TV stations, and I know that the simple addition of individual titles at the beginning of each movie costs time and money to make, and requires the labor of two or three staff members. One to do the research, another to do the typing, another to do the dub, another to edit, etc., etc.

 

TCM probably cut them out years ago to free up some staff memembers so they could do other things.

 

They can't keep adding things like the daily iPhone app, the Classic Film Union stuff, the main TCM fancy flash-player animated website (changed every month), and the message board with a full-time moderator. Not to mention the organization for the annual Film Festival and the boat Cruise. Plus organizing the contests and writing all the press releases. With all this work to do, it's a wonder they have any staff left over to plan, find, and rent the movies we see on TV. I think they've already got a factory working to full capacity. :)

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