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SOME LIKE IT HOT - A QUESTION


TCMFanHelenB
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Ok, none of you will believe this but I just watched Some Like It Hot for the very first time ever. It was on a few days ago and I DVR recorded it. My question is this - at the end of the movie after THE END comes up on the screen and the movie fades out to black, the music continued for the usual 30-40 seconds where maybe some credits usually are shown however the screen simply remained in black during this end music. Is that the way the movie was made? Or was that some sort of technical meltdown somewhere? Does anyone know? Thanks very much :)

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> {quote:title=TCMFanHelenB wrote:

> }{quote}I just watched Some Like It Hot for the very first time ever.

> At the end of the movie after THE END comes up on the screen and the movie fades out to black, the music continued for the usual 30-40 seconds where maybe some credits usually are shown however the screen simply remained in black during this end music. Is that the way the movie was made? Or was that some sort of technical meltdown somewhere? Does anyone know? Thanks very much :)

 

Yes, that's the way the movie was made. The extra music after the end title (or if there's an end cast list) is usually called Exit Music. It was intended to play as the theater audience got up and left the theater. Exit music is not on all movies, in fact it's pretty rare. It was common on many early sound movies (1929 through about 1934) and revived only occasionally during the years following. Fox Films are among the few who kept up the practice through even as late as 1934. CHARLIE CHAN IN LONDON and CURLY TOP (both Fox, 1934) have exit music. The 1933 Hal Roach/MGM feature THE DEVIL'S BROTHER starring Laurel & Hardy has exit music, but those are among the last for that period.

Unfortunately the Exit Music film footage is chopped off a lot of the older movies or TV stations fade it out or cut it off and don't let it play. So we can be thankful to TCM who lets the Exit Music play.

 

Exit Music for some of those early movies was actually called the Exit March (did they really expect the audience to march out?) And sometimes the Exit Music was called the Chaser.

 

So, anyway, you didn't miss any of SOME LIKE IT HOT. There was no end cast list, (and all credits were given at the start of the movie) and the Exit Music was played over a black screen, as you saw.

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Thank you very much for answering my question and also for all of the additional information as well. I don't think I've ever seen a completely blacked out screen before while there was still music playing after the movie so that made me wonder about it. Thanks again for your help.

 

:)

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There was entrance and exit music for the 1936 film "San Francisco".

 

I never knew that until I started going to see the film in a retro theater in San Francisco every April. They ran the film for nearly a week during the time of every anniversary, and the theater was always packed at each showing.

 

The projectionist played an audio tape of music from the film, both before and after the film was shown.

 

One time I asked the projectionist if he would make me an audio tape copy of the music, and he did. He charged me $25. This contained some of the songs from the film, but with no talking over it, just the music and the singing. Plus there was a song on the recording that was not in the film.

 

Hmm, I wonder if this audio tape is valuable today??

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FredCDobbs, I did catch a showing of San Francisco on TCM once and enjoyed it very much. Pretty good effects or whatever for 1936. The earthquake scene is amazing considering when it was made.

$25 seems like alot for an audio cassette. How long ago was that. Some people, myself included would probably copy taped music for nothing so long as you supplied the tape. Oh well, I guess everybody has to eat or whatever. By the way, I noticed TCM will be showing A Night To Remember on the 100th anniversary of the disaster, April 14th @ 10PM - 12:15AM on the 15th.. The exact time the ship struck the iceberg 100 years ago was at 11:40pm.

 

Dargo, Thanks for the welcome!!!! :) I enjoyed it actually, but it's not a movie I would feel compelled to watch again or suggest to friends to watch either. It was worth seeing once.

 

Misswonderly, Ummmmmm.... Huh?

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"San Francisco" (1936) had several directors. I read a newspaper article about it years ago.

 

W.S. VanDyke was the main director for the drama.

 

IMDB lists three other assistant and second unit directors:

 

D.W. Griffith .... second unit director (uncredited)

Joseph M. Newman .... assistant director (uncredited)

Will Sheldon .... assistant director (uncredited)

 

Griffith set up and directed the few scenes of the vast tent city in Golden Gate Park (actually filmed at some park in Los Angeles).

 

Another director directed the special earthquake sequence, and another one directed the opera sequences.

 

Special Effects by:

James Basevi special effects (uncredited)

Russell A. Cully special effects: earthquake sequence (uncredited)

A. Arnold Gillespie special effects (uncredited)

Max Fabian special photographic effects (uncredited)

Other crew:

Val Raset dances stager

William von Wymetal stager: operatic sequences

 

Just for fun, D.W. Griffith was the orchestra conductor during the opera sequences. Watch for him in the wide shots in the film.

 

I first saw this movie on TV when I was a teenager back in the 1950s, and I was amazed at the earthquake sequence, especially when the ground separated, exposing the big water pipe.

 

The music is actually hi-fi. There are low notes on the church organ that can not be heard over standard TV speakers. There are also low-frequency earthquake rumbles that can not be heard on TV speakers.

 

This is why I spent the money for the black-market copy of the audio tape. I had never heard such high and low tones on any film made as early as 1936.

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>$25 seems like alot for an audio cassette, (Fred). How long ago was that. Some people, myself included would probably copy taped music for nothing so long as you supplied the tape. Oh well, I guess everybody has to eat or whatever.

 

Anybody who believes the asinine fiction that the Nazis took control of Germany because the citizens had no guns is apt to be suckered into all sorts of dumb deals. What's next, Fred, selling the family cow for a handful of magic beans?

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