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Karl Malden as SOTM March 2012


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_MARCH 7 & 8_

THE SELLOUT (1952) with Walter Pidgeon, John Hodiak & Audrey Totter

RUBY (1953) with Jennifer Jones & Charlton Heston

BABY DOLL (1956) with Carroll Baker & Eli Wallach

PHANTOM OF THE RUE MORGUE (1954) with Patricia Medina & Steve Forrest

DEAD RINGER (1964) with Bette Davis & Peter Lawford

PARRISH (1961) with Troy Donahue & Claudette Colbert

MURDERERS' ROW (1966) with Dean Martin & Ann-Margret

 

*He is topbilled in BABY DOLL and PHANTOM OF THE RUE MORGUE. He is seventh-billed in THE SELLOUT. They should've aired FEAR STRIKES OUT instead, where he's second-billed with Anthony Perkins.*

 

_MARCH 14 & 15_

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE (1952) with Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando & Kim Hunter

ON THE WATERFRONT (1954) with Marlon Brando & Lee J. Cobb

TIME LIMIT (1957)...as director only...with Richard Widmark, Richard Basehart & Dolores Michaels

COME FLY WITH ME (1963) with Dolores Hart & Hugh O'Brian

HOTEL (1967) with Rod Taylor, Melvyn Douglas & Merle Oberon

BILLION DOLLAR BRAIN (1967) with Michael Caine & Ed Begley

 

*He has a bigger role in Brando's ONE EYED JACKS which is not being aired.*

 

_MARCH 21 & 22_

ALL FALL DOWN (1962) with Eva Marie Saint, Warren Beatty & Angela Lansbury

THE HANGING TREE (1959)...co-direction...with Gary Cooper & Maria Schell

NEVADA SMITH (1966) with Steve McQueen, Brian Keith & Suzanne Pleshette

HOW THE WEST WAS WON (1963) with Debbie Reynolds, Carroll Baker & Lee J. Cobb

BOOMERANG! (1947) with Dana Andrews & Jane Wyatt

 

*He has reduced screen time in HOW THE WEST WAS WON. This is filler programming and instead they should've shown CHEYENNE AUTUMN, a western with almost the same running time where he has much more to do. Or else, PATTON would've worked well in this long time slot where he is second-billed with George C. Scott. He also has very little screen time in BOOMERANG! though that is the first time he worked with Kazan on screen and is an important film for him.*

 

_MARCH 28 & 29_

I CONFESS (1953) with Montgomery Clift & Anne Baxter

TAKE THE HIGH GROUND! (1953) with Richard Widmark & Russ Tamblyn

THE CINCINNATI KID (1965) with Steve McQueen, Edward G. Robinson & Ann-Margret

GYPSY (1962) with Rosalind Russell & Natalie Wood

BOMBERS B-52 (1957) with Natalie Wood, Marsha Hunt & Efrem Zimbalist Jr.

HOT MILLIONS (1968) with Peter Ustinov & Maggie Smith

 

*His biggest role in this group of films is the second-billed one in BOMBERS B-52.*

 

Overall, these are fairly much the oft-played titles from the Turner Library. Significant films that are missing include: OPERATION SECRET (1952); DIPLOMATIC COURIER (1952); FEAR STRIKES OUT (1957); POLLYANNA (1960); ONE EYED JACKS (1961); BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ (1962); CHEYENNE AUTUMN (1964); THE ADVENTURES OF BULLWHIP GRIFFIN (1967); BLUE (1968); PATTON (1970); WILD ROVERS (1971); and CAT O' NINE TAILS (1971) where he is topbilled.

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Karl Malden was a great actor and in many fine films.

Maybe this question has been answered elsewhere but wonder how TCM chooses the films and schedule?? Do they only use films in the Turner library???

Sorry if this question has been answered before...

 

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*Patton* has been steady rotation on both the Retroplex and Multiplex channels the last few months as well as Fox's own FMC.

 

*Cheyenne Autumn* has been in rotation on the Encore Western channel lately.

 

*One-Eyed Jacks*, for some reason, seems to be a difficult film to obtain.

 

While *Pollyanna* has been on TCM in the past, *Bullwhip Griffin* hasn't and may have something to do with Disney. I don't know if either film has aired on ABC's Family network.

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> {quote:title=RMeingast wrote:}{quote}Karl Malden was a great actor and in many fine films.

> Maybe this question has been answered elsewhere but wonder how TCM chooses the films and schedule?? Do they only use films in the Turner library???

> Sorry if this question has been answered before...

I think just as an economic reality their first choices come from the Turner Library and other films in the possession of Warner Brothers. They seem to have long term lease agreements with Sony (Columbia) and MGM/United Artists (The post 1952 UA library). Also, most post 1948 Paramounts seem to be easy for TCM to come by. What seems to get expensive is anything from Fox or Universal, which includes the 1929-1948 Paramount library. Universal is a problem mainly because of the poor condition of their library.

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When *Billion Dollar Brain* played on TCM on 08/01/08, it was missing the scene where A Hard Day’s Night is heard.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061405/alternateversions

 

Is there any chance that the we-know-how-not-to-cut people will be able to reverse the Beatle-ectomy and show the complete movie? It’s not that we don’t appreciate the retention of Karl Malden’s nude scene, but, really, we want everything. Thanks.

 

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> {quote:title=calvinnme wrote:}{quote}

> I think just as an economic reality their first choices come from the Turner Library and other films in the possession of Warner Brothers. They seem to have long term lease agreements with Sony (Columbia) and MGM/United Artists (The post 1952 UA library). Also, most post 1948 Paramounts seem to be easy for TCM to come by. What seems to get expensive is anything from Fox or Universal, which includes the 1929-1948 Paramount library. Universal is a problem mainly because of the poor condition of their library.

 

Yes, thank you. Checked Wiki myself - just shows how lazy I am that I couldn't have checked this myself first - and it explains things pretty well (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_Classic_Movies):

 

h3. ^**"**Movie library^

Besides MGM, [united Artists|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Artists|United Artists]^[[8]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_Classic_Movies#cite_note-7]^ and Warner Bros. releases, TCM also shows films under license from [universal Studios|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Studios|Universal Studios], [Paramount Pictures|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paramount_Pictures|Paramount Pictures], [20th Century Fox|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Century_Fox|20th Century Fox], [Walt Disney Productions|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Pictures|Walt Disney Pictures], [Columbia Pictures|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_Pictures|Columbia Pictures], [studioCanal|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StudioCanal|StudioCanal] and [Janus Films|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janus_Films|Janus Films]. Most pre-1950 Paramount releases are owned by [EMKA, Ltd.|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMKA,_Ltd.|EMKA, Ltd.]/[NBCUniversal Television Distribution|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBCUniversal_Television_Distribution|NBCUniversal Television Distribution], while Paramount (currently owned by [Viacom|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viacom|Viacom]) holds on to most of its post-1949 releases, which are handled for television by [Trifecta Entertainment & Media|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifecta_Entertainment_%26_Media|Trifecta Entertainment & Media]. Columbia's output is owned by [sony|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony|Sony] through [sony Pictures Television|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_Pictures_Television|Sony Pictures Television], the films of 20th Century Fox (owned by the [News Corporation|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/News_Corporation|News Corporation]), are handled for television by [20th Television|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Television|20th Television], and Walt Disney Productions (owned by [The Walt Disney Company|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Walt_Disney_Company|The Walt Disney Company]) has their output handled for television by [Disney-ABC Domestic Television|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disney-ABC_Domestic_Television|Disney-ABC Domestic Television]. TCM occasionally shows some classic films from [20th Century Fox|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Century_Fox|20th Century Fox],^[[9]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_Classic_Movies#cite_note-8]^ [Paramount Pictures|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paramount_Pictures|Paramount Pictures],^[[10]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_Classic_Movies#cite_note-9]^ [universal Studios|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Studios|Universal Studios] and [Columbia Pictures|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_Pictures|Columbia Pictures], but they are licensed individually.

 

Although a vast majority of the movies shown on Turner Classic Movies are from the 1930s through 1960s, some are more contemporary; it is not uncommon for TCM to air films released in the 1970s, 1980s or (in rare cases) the 1990s and early 2000s (decade).*"*

 

Now what about public domain films on TCM??? :)

Watched some of Orson Welles 1962 movie "The Trial" yesterday being aired by a local TV channel in Ontario, Canada. That film is now in the public domain.

The only problem were the commercial interruptions during the film.

 

 

 

 

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*"Now what about public domain films on TCM???"* - RMeingast

 

The head of Programming touched on this just a few days ago in an article in the NYPost.

 

?There are some distributors that specialize in public domain movies. The better ones tend to have the better material,? Tabesh says. ?We don?t pay a ?license fee? for the film, but we do pay to be able to access their version. In addition, we sometimes go to film archives that have good film prints; if we pay for the cost of mastering to video and credit them on-air we can often work out an agreement. A good example of this is ?Cyrano de Bergerac? which we just obtained from UCLA.?

 

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/night_at_the_movies_TTej3cCe0I6t8lLj9fSZPI#ixzz1lc8jaLXm

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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A very well-thought and researched OP. Although I do have to say that the film you refer to as Ruby from 1953 is, I believe, Ruby Gentry from 1952. It's a fun film with a wonderful bad-girl turn from Jennifer Jones and one that I always enjoy seeing as it is set in me home state of North Carolina.

 

However: I'm getting to the point where I think that TCM will formulate any possible excuse to show the film *All Fall Down* for any reason whatsoever. I fully expect both Eva Marie Saint and Beatty Star of the Month turns, possibly an inclusion for both in SUTS, a "Directed by John Frankenheimer" theme night, a day of films with the word "fall" in the title, and when the sad day that Angela Lansbury passes from the mortal coil, comes you can bet your damn bippy the trib will lead off with Gaslight and All Fall Down.

 

 

Why the hell do you love this film so much TCM? Yes, it's well-acted and has a good cast (props to Brandon DeWilde (sic?)), but *kee-ripes:* it is such a tedious, overwrought, mundane little affair- and honestly, it's been in heavy rotation for the last two or three years.

 

 

I thank the good Lord it wasn't nominated for any Oscars.

 

Edited by: JonnyGeetar on Feb 6, 2012 10:18 AM

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TIME LIMIT (1957)...as director only...with Richard Widmark, Richard Basehart & Dolores Michaels

 

That's the best movie of the entire month. Anyone who hasn't seen this extraordinary film should mark it on their calendar. Widmark and Basehart are perfectly cast, and the plot doesn't strike a single false note.

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}*"Now what about public domain films on TCM???"* - RMeingast

>

> The head of Programming touched on this just a few days ago in an article in the NYPost.

>

> There are some distributors that specialize in public domain movies. The better ones tend to have the better material, Tabesh says. We dont pay a license fee for the film, but we do pay to be able to access their version. In addition, we sometimes go to film archives that have good film prints; if we pay for the cost of mastering to video and credit them on-air we can often work out an agreement. A good example of this is Cyrano de Bergerac which we just obtained from UCLA.

>

> Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/night_at_the_movies_TTej3cCe0I6t8lLj9fSZPI#ixzz1lc8jaLXm

>

> Kyle In Hollywood

Thanks much, Kyle...

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> {quote:title=drednm wrote:}{quote}Boring choice but lots of DVDs to sell. Star? I don't think so. Any more than Angela Lansbury was a STAR in movies. Hawk them DVDs.

How about as director then?? See post about "Time Limit"...

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>A very well-thought and researched OP. Although I do have to say that the film you refer to as Ruby from 1953 is, I believe, Ruby Gentry from 1952.

 

You're right, Jonny. Thanks for the correction. That is one of the few films that they took the time to acquire from Fox for this SOTM tribute (the other being BOOMERANG!).

 

I completely agree about ALL FALL DOWN. I happen to like it, but it did not need to be-aired so soon after Lansbury's tribute.

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Of course, Encore Western channel seldom shows films in widescreen format. It helps when something like CHEYENNE AUTUMN turns up on TCM, as it is usually, though not always, presented in the widescreen version.

 

I was thinking BULLWHIP GRIFFIN aired a few years ago when they did the month-long tribute to Disney Live Action, but perhaps I am mistaken about that. At any rate, I would like to see it on TCM...any chance to see Suzanne Pleshette films on TCM is a real treat in my opinion.

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STOM should be a star, not a marketing gimmick for selling DVDs. I can name at least 50 majors stars who have never been STOM. Karl Malden? Angela Lansbury? Who next? Sonny Bupp? Pauly Shore?

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> {quote:title=drednm wrote:}{quote}STOM should be a star, not a marketing gimmick for selling DVDs. I can name at least 50 majors stars who have never been STOM. Karl Malden? Angela Lansbury? Who next? Sonny Bupp? Pauly Shore?

Don't tell me, tell TCM... But you know TCM is not a charity devoted to serving the wants of classic film fans, unfortunately. The films they own are worth money and money is what makes the world go 'round, mein freund...

But guess we can complain/suggest, I suppose...

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it is such a tedious, overwrought, mundane little affair- and honestly, it's been in heavy rotation for the last two or three years.

 

I don't consider it a berry, berry good movie. Yes, it is berry, berry overwrought, and it is berry, berry much in constant rotation. And there is one character name in there which is berry, berry annoying with its constantly being mentioned. It goes to show that his parents didn't have berry, berry much imagination.

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I love your post and the berry, berry comments. When I first saw this movie I said to myself; OK, his little brother looks up to him and has a pet name for him so I can expect to hear 'berry, berry' maybe twice, as a way of making this point (the affection between younger and older bro which is key to the entire theme of the movie), and that will be the end of it...

 

Instead the makers of this movie keep this up over, and over and over again. It really is in poor taste. You would think that after the movie was showed to studio heads someone would of said 'ax out that berry, berry crap!'.

 

 

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"Baseball been berry, berry good to me."

 

Garrett Morris as Chico Escuela on SNL is what comes to mind when I think of that movie. Granted, I saw the film first, but once SNL introduced that character, I could not help but think of ALL FALL DOWN.

 

I'm glad that you liked the post, thank you for commenting.

 

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Dear God yes, you hit it.

 

If ever there should have been a studio meeting where it was decided to wrest control of a film away from the young, maverick director this was it. And even if they renamed the character "Karl" and badly dubbed it in Japanese-monster-movie style, and when the characters say "Karl" you can clearly see their mouths saying "Berry-Berry" it would be a thousand times better than having to listen to the endless "Berry-Berry"ing that goes on throughout the entirety All Fall Down.

 

For the raging substance abusers among you, may I suggest the All Fall Down Drinking/ Bong Hit Game a.k.a. All Fall Down Within Ten Minutes ? You take a shot (or whatever) every time a character says the words, well- you know.

 

(Don't blame me if you have to call the ambulance.)

 

P.S.-Isn't Berri-Berri some kind of Japanese food poisoning or something?

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> {quote:title=JonnyGeetar wrote:}{quote}

>

> P.S.-Isn't Berri-Berri some kind of Japanese food poisoning or something?

>

 

Beriberi a nervous system ailment caused by a vitamin B deficiency. I think it used to be rather common in the US. In Japan, I don't know. Pellagra is also a vitamin B deficiency disease.

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