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Has anyone else noticed:

 

 

That it was ludicrous to cast two blond actresses as the daughters of Elizabeth Taylor and Rock Hudson?

 

 

That there was zero chemistry between Dennis Hopper and the actress playing his wife?

 

 

That it didn't appear as though Elizabeth Taylor's parents ever visited Texas? Did they see each other at all other than that one visit?

 

 

 

 

 

BLU

 

 

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Seems to be based on a story written by someone who has never visited Texas or any rural Western state. I would guess it was written by a mid-westerner or a New Yorker.

 

The thing at the end where the rich Texas oil-man land barron goes into a working-man's diner, then gets into a fist fight with the waiter, is absurd.

 

I remember Texas from when I lived there in the '40s and then later in the '60s. I went to the 1st Grade in Texas. The Mexican kids mostly didn't speak any English and they went to my school. Their classrooms were on one side of the hallway, and us non-Mexican kids were on the other side. The Mexican kids had bilingual teachers.

 

We had classroom doors that opened directly into the hallway (for going to the bathroom) and another door that opened directly to the outside. We came and went by the outside doorway, and so did the Mexican kids. Therefore, we never met. We had "recess" on different sides of the building.

 

I remember riding through Dallas in '53 when the big red neon flying horse sign was still on top of one of the big hotels.

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Thanks!

 

Maybe Giant should have been made as a musical. Musicals usually allow for a little more fantasy.

 

I certainly liked Edna Ferber's Show Boat (although the songs were written by and for New Yorkers).

 

My dad told me about seeing showboats that still visited Natchez-under-the-hill in the 1930s. They were, he said, like traveling vaudeville shows, playing many of the river towns up and down the Mississippi River.

 

And then in the late 1950s or early '60s, I attended a 19th Century type theatrical play aboard the paddle-wheeler Sprague at Vicksburg. The play was similar to the drama shown in the Show Boat movie. Back then (late '50s), rumors of someone having "some colored blood" would be enough to get a cast member "laid off" as being "no longer needed".

 

However, contrary to popular belief today, anyone "passing" in those days might not realize the variety of their own ancestry, and calling someone "mixed" could get the verbal offender shot dead on the spot. :) So, there were sometimes rumors about someone, but no one dared talk openly about it, just in case they were wrong (they didn?t want to get shot), or just in case they were right but the person they were talking about might not realize their own ancestry (they didn't want to offend that person).

 

Strange how much America has changed in a fairly short about of time.

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{font:}{color:black}I watched it again and was struck by the fact that the problems this couple faced didn't really have all that much to do with money. Wealth and power did contribute to Bick's arrogance but was not the main source of his conflicts with Leslie. They had to learn to accept each other as they were and love regardless, deal with the fact that their expatiations for their children did not match what the children wanted, and finally the fact that the their world was changing and they had become the "older generation" with those behind them now running the show. This is true of all families regardless of their economic status. This is what keeps the story moving. {font}

 

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{font:}{color:black}I guess you're right about the family coloring from a genetic standpoint but I never noticed it before. Jordan and Juana have so little time together in the film I didn't catch the lack of sparks but she was a religious and cultured Mexican woman so would have been reserved in that department in public. {font}

 

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{font:}{color:black}Travel was more difficult back then and we're talking about 2,000 miles at least. Maybe the Lyntons didn't go to Texas or if they did, it didn't seem important to the story. {font}

 

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{font:}{color:black}FredC: That scene is also in the book and is one of my favorites. Most of scenes involving the Mexicans show how discriminated they were. It’s ironic that Angel, whom Leslie has to fight to save as a sick child, is the one who dies in defense of the country that allows such treatment of his people. The restaurant incident shows that while Bick has changed in his views a bit, he and the country have a long way to go. OK, maybe it’s just family honor but I’d rather see it as Leslie does. {font}

 

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{font:}{color:black}A big gaffe seems to appear when Bob and Judy get married. Pearl Harbor is announced as they leave their car and head for a bedroom in the Benedict house. When we see them come down it’s Christmas morning. Insert your own risqué comment. {font}

 

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{font:}{color:black}None of this has changed my love for this movie. I find so much to like and nothing is perfect. Enjoyed seeing it again. {font}

 

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>But the SON being blonde too, well, what's up with that?

 

Prejudice against Texas and Texans.

 

See this PDF article. It takes less than a minute to download using a DSL link.

 

https://journals.ku.edu/index.php/amerstud/article/viewFile/3131/3910

 

In December 1954, America's best-selling historical novelist, Edna Ferber,

wrote to director George Stevens emphasizing her continued interest in his

production of her latest book, Giant. She believed that Giant's value lay in its

exposure of racial prejudice against Mexican Americans in Texas, and that its

racial themes had become "more vital, more prevalent today in the United States

than . . . when I began to write the novel." Ferber hoped that one day Anglo

oil millionaires like Bick Benedict and Jett Rink, the originators and perpetuators

of these inequalities in the economic and social hierarchies of America's

new West, would be "anachronisms like the dear old covered wagons and the

California gold-rush boys."

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>Most of scenes involving the Mexicans show how discriminated they were.

 

Yeah, well, all poor people are discriminated against by rich millionaires of all kinds, including rich Mexicans.

 

Watch some of the novella soap operas on Mexican TV, such as Univision, and you'll see the wealthy Mexican millionaire families looking down on the poor Mexican peasants.

 

This is life, and it's life for everyone everywhere. I'll bet I've been to Mexico and Central America many more times than Edna Ferber ever went. I've got Mexicans living around me in my neighborhood right now. They are fine neighbors. I wonder how many Mexicans Edna Ferber lived among in Wisconsin and New York?

 

Look at the Hollywood prejudice against poor whites in "Deliverance" and "A Streetcar Named Desire". Hollywood promoted prejudice against Mexicans in many films for many decades. "Giant" should have been set in Hollywood among the rich movie producers of the 1930s and '40s. Why wasn't Mike Vargas played by a Mexican actor in "Touch of Evil"?

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July, 2010, New York Times:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/31/nyregion/31staten.html

 

Police officers patrolling by foot, car and helicopter have turned Port Richmond Avenue, a busy commercial strip on Staten Island, into something like an armed encampment. Reporters have descended en masse. Community leaders dash from crisis meeting to crisis meeting.

 

A spate of attacks in the past four months on Mexican immigrants has upended Port Richmond, a working-class neighborhood on the borough's north shore that is more accustomed to being ignored.

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Has anyone else noticed:

 

That it was ludicrous to cast two blond actresses as the daughters of Elizabeth Taylor and Rock Hudson?

 

That there was zero chemistry between Dennis Hopper and the actress playing his wife?

 

 

The main thing I noticed about Giant is that the 23 year old Elizabeth Taylor was playing a very unconvincing grandmother, as well as playing a mother to a 19 year old actor. Barbara Stanwyck she ain't.

 

 

If it hadn't been for James Dean ending his career with a bang, this movie would've been one of the all-time clinkers. It was a virtual Encyclopedia of Shopworn Stereotypes and Tiresome Cliches.

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*It was a virtual Encyclopedia of Shopworn Stereotypes and Tiresome Cliches.* - Andy

 

Oh, come on! I shoot a rattlesnake every time I'm out riding a horse and herding cattle.

 

Actually, I've been known to pick them up by the tail and move them off the road on cold nights to keep them from being run over. But that wouldn't make for a good movie.

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Oh, by the way, I've taken several Amtrak trains from New Orleans to El Paso, and every time we passed through central and west Texas (which took about 12 hours or more), we passed many big two-story ranch houses, but none that I saw were more than a mile from the track, and a major highway ran alongside the track. Such a train trip is quite a show, with the big windows on the trains. We see antelope, coyotes, jack rabbits, lots of cows and horses, big ranches, and a bunch of really old Texas towns, and we can see over into Mexico during the last hundred or so miles.

 

There could have been some houses 50 miles from the track that I could not see, but it seems to me that the "Giant" ranch house, fancy as a big Victorian, was way too far out of any town and away from any highway or train track. There would be no need to build a main house that far away from stores, doctors, trains, highways, etc. All the big ranches actually had other houses and living quarters deeper into the ranches, for over-night and week-long stays, if the owners needed, for some reason, to go deep onto his property. There was never just one single big ranch houses on those big ranches, and to build a fancy Victorian that no one could see from a train, highway, or town, didn?t make much sense. A big house like that was designed to show off to everyone who passed by.

 

Now, as far as Mexican discrimination goes, every time I've crossed the main bridge at El Paso, crossing the Rio Grande into Mexico, I always saw Mexicans wading across the river from Mexico into the US. I NEVER saw any US citizens wading across from the US into Mexico. The Mexicans have kept coming here by the thousands and the hundreds of thousands for the past 50 or more years, because they find more jobs and less discrimination here than they find in their home country of Mexico. I see a couple of dozen new immigrants in my local Wal-Mart every time I go shopping there. I can tell the new immigrants because many are wearing western clothes and straw hats of a kind manufactured in Mexico, and some are quietly speaking to each other in Spanish. They are very nice friendly people

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Fred, if Eli Wallach, an American Jew, can play a Mexican, then certainly Charlton Heston, an American Christian, can play a Mexican too.

 

By the way, my wife is a Laredo Texas born Mexican whose Webb County birth certificate states her race is "White". God only knows when she became "Brown".

 

Sepiatone

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Heston just seemed way out of place in that role. Maybe it was the bad makeup and his lack of any kind of Mexican accent. He sounded like Moses to me. I think Ricardo Montalban would have been much better in that role. Also, the stop signs on the Mexican side of the border should have said ALTO, rather than STOP.

 

The makeup for Paul Newman in The Outrage was much better, and Newman's accent was much better too. Maybe they should have used Newman in Touch of Evil. :)

 

http://28.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljymrpbka01qi97xgo1_500.jpg

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