Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
TopBilled

Good movies & good reading

Recommended Posts

imgres33.jpg

This is intended to be a thread where we can relate literature directly to classic films.

 

It doesn't always mean books. Instead, it means:

 

1. Nonfiction about classic Hollywood filmmaking-- including (auto)biographies, interviews. and movie reviews (I am very partial to Pauline Kael and James Agee).

 

2. Fiction-- this falls into two subcategories-- stories that serve as the inspiration for adapted screenplays; and stories that are based on original screenplays (you know, where the published material comes out after the movie).

 

3. Other-- including magazine articles and poems that relate directly to classic movies. Also, excerpts from actual scripts can be examined.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I would start by mentioning GONE WITH THE WIND, since it aired on PBS last night. How many forum posters have read at least a portion of Margaret Mitchell's novel...?

 

imgres49.jpg

 

How faithful is the movie?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Richard,
 
First, I knew you had done some posting along these lines but I could not find your threads when I used the search engine (which does not always work).
 
But my understanding is you are looking at books specifically. If you will see in the original post here in my thread, books are about a third of what I will be mentioning-- because I plan to include Kael's newspaper reviews as well as magazine stories by other authors. So I think my idea is a bit broader. Plus, in terms of fiction, I think you were looking at books that served as the basis for films, yes? And I also want to explore books that were published based on the screenplays of hit films. 
 
So I do not think we are going to have much overlap-- and some of the books that I will pick may not be ones you wanted to discuss anyway...but if we do occasionally have a little overlap, I sincerely doubt I will approach a book discussion the way you are.
 
Hopefully visitors to the forums will be able to find something worthwhile from both our threads. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In sort of(I think) that spirit, I'd forward mention of WOODY ALLEN'S approach to EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX(but were afraid to ask)!

 

I mean, you DID list "non-fiction" in your list, did you not?

 

BEN HUR(1925)  and...

 

KING OF KINGS(1927)

 

Were TWO of the best movies I've EVER read!

 

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved reading Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina" and "War and Peace".  The movies have been fairly good but these long long books contain so very much.  Incredible novels.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved reading Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina" and "War and Peace".  The movies have been fairly good but these long long books contain so very much.  Incredible novels.

WAR AND PEACE was beautifully done in the mid-50s by King Vidor. I wish TCM would re-air it. It was one of those rare times that real-life couple Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer appeared together on screen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About a week or so ago TCM aired RACHEL AND THE STRANGER. I was quite taken with the performances and the story itself. I researched it a bit and discovered that it was based on a short piece by a writer named Howard Fast. 

 

The next day I contacted the reference librarian and my local public library and asked her if she could help me locate the story. Two days later I received an email from her saying she had found it. Then earlier this week, I received another email it had arrived. It was included in a volume of Fast's writings, which looks like this:

 

photo-1.jpg

 

And the story, upon which Waldo Salt's screenplay is based, is called Rachel. It's 18 pages, and I hope to have the chance to read it tomorrow.

 

photo-2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised more people have not posted on this thread.  Another excellent example of a great emotional novel being made into a great classic movie is Erich Maria Remarque's great novel ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT being made into the 1930 movie.  The book is so moving and saddening as is the movie.  If you've only seen the movie then I recommend reading the great novel by Remarque who was a German WW1 veteran. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This afternoon (and early tomorrow, after midnight)-- Retroplex is airing the very, very obscure Columbia classic THE LIBERATION OF L.B. JONES. It last aired on TCM in January 2011. The screenplay was adapted from a book called 'The Liberation of Lord Byron Jones' by (white) southern writer Jesse Hill Ford. It's about the racial tensions in a Tennessee town when white cops kill a wealthy black man. 

screen-shot-2015-05-04-at-9-28-32-am.png

I was wondering how much of it was based on fact. And this is what I found online, from a magazine article (source is cited at the end):

 

"In 1962 as Ford began to cast around for the subject of his next novel, his maid told him about the mysterious 1955 murder of James Claybrook Humboldt's wealthy black undertaker. He had been found dead, shot twice and propped up against a tree, on a deserted back road. He had been trying to divorce his wife, Dorothy Claybrook who was considerably younger than he was and to whom he had been married for just a year. The case was never solved. But as Ford's maid explained it, a white policeman who had been having an affair with Dorothy Claybrook killed the undertaker to prevent the affair from becoming public through the divorce proceedings.

 

"Almost everything in Lord Byron Jones came out of Ford's experiences in Humboldt. Somerton, the fictional setting, replicated the town exactly, and the plot followed the story of the Claybrook killing. Even Lord Byron Jones's name was suggested by the name of Ford's black friend Alfred Lord Tennyson Pulliam. Ford did invent the main character, Oman Hedgepath, a lawyer and an unapologetic racist, who reluctantly agrees to represent the undertaker in his divorce, then betrays him to the policeman to avoid a scandal."

 

***

Source: Taylor, J. (1997). The liberation of Jesse Hill Ford. Esquire127(2), 74.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

photo.jpg

Every so often, I will refer to Pauline Kael's reviews. I highly recommend this book (published in 1982), as I find it to be an invaluable resource. What I love most about Kael is that she is well-versed about old Hollywood, but she provides a unique window into what was then contemporary Hollywood cinema. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

photo.jpg

Every so often, I will refer to Pauline Kael's reviews. I highly recommend this book (published in 1982), as I find it to be an invaluable resource. What I love most about Kael is that she is well-versed about old Hollywood, but she provides a unique window into what was then contemporary Hollywood cinema. 

:D I remember reading!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D I remember reading!

Yeah...the good old days..of reading not from computer screens but actual books made of paper (remember those?)...LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...