Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Whitney Houston 1963-2012


filmlover
 Share

Recommended Posts

> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote}I think we all suspect what the cause will be announced as.

>

> Tragic.

The official toxicology reports won't come through for six to eight weeks yet, but Whitney's family has already said that it was a combination of the drug Xanax and booze which she died from. There apparently wasn't enough water in her lungs for her to have drowned in the bathtub...seems the pills and booze did it and then she died in the tub.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

REALLY, willbe???

 

Gotta say, while I too was never a really big Whitney Houston fan myself, I think if you remember this here....

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jeUINzHK9o

 

...then I think maybe you might start grasping the reason why she was beloved by so many people, or at least why her voice was beloved by so many people, anyway!

 

(...I mean, dude...how could anyone hear that voice and not "belove" it???)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice job, I admit. Such enthusiasm in her face back then, a real shame. Look at her here though, scary face, scarier words:

 

 

 

Mr. willbefree (dudette here) loves the I-E-I-E-I-E-I-E-E-I Will Always Love You and the Wind/Wing song, so that was my exposure to her. The first song spawned the devils on American Idol with that trilling thing (there's a name for it, right?) and that is what makes my skin crawl.

 

I give her props for her voice in 1991, no contest.

 

Me, I'm more of a Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits fan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, willbe. That whole trilling thing is called "coloratura". And yep, unfortunately that whole thing has gotten WAY out of hand with pop singers today who it appears have a 'special need' to attempt to impress us with their octive range, WHICH isn't all that bad sometimes I suppose, but to tell ya the truth(and while I'm pretty much kidding here), I WISH Congress would pass a freakin' law makin' it illegal to sing our National Anthem while doing that more than just the couple of times Whitney did it there!!!!

 

(...in other words, LISTEN all you Half-Talents out there...you're no Whitney Houston and never will be and you're NEVER in a million freakin' years gonna be able to top her rendition of The Star-Spangled Banner here, and so before the ballgame JUST SING the friggin' song and get off the friggin' playing field!!!!) X-(

 

:^0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes Whitney Houston sang the utimate version of the Star Spangled Banner. She did it traditionally and got it down to perfection. I have seen many stars do it before and after some I liked and some I hated. Asking a comedienne to sing it like Roseanne Barr was insulting, if they had to have a funny lady sing it they should have gotten someone like Madeline Kahn now she really could sing. Last year on 2 diffrent occasions both Christina Auguilera and Cyndi Lauper both phenominal singers in their own right mess up the National Anthem and were given such bad press over it. They are human and made a miustake at least they didn't make a mockery out of the song. Rest in peace Whitney.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Find the bottom of your vocal range. That's the third note of "The Star-Spangled Banner".

 

Alternatively, we could either get rid of the dumb idea of singing the national anthem before sporting events; if we must play the song, have a pre-recorded instrumental version like FIFA does at the World Cup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

{font:Arial}Many fans don’t know that Whitney Houston’s signature song, “I Will Always Love You” was in fact, already a hit tune, written and introduced by Country Singing superstar Dolly Parton in 1974. The song hit at number one on the Country Music charts. Considered one of Parton’s best tunes, it was greatly admired by none other than Elvis! His grand majesty of Rock Music wanted to record his own cover version. He contacted Dolly to cut a deal. Lurking in the shadows was manager to Elvis, Colonel Tom Parker. Before anything could be finalized, Parker had insisted that Elvis must have 50 percent of the publishing rights to the song. Dolly had come a very long way in the music industry, struggling to make a success for herself. Upon becoming a major singing star, she refused to relinquish any control of what she fought so long and hard to establish. Many in the music business hearing about the situation, advised her to reconsider her refusal to the King of Rock and Roll. After all, Elvis was a living legend and a recording by him would mean added notoriety for Dolly. Her decision to not give up control of the song was for the longest time, one of the most earth shattering experiences of her career. {font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}There was one issue that has remained rather unfamiliar about “I Will Always Love You” in that Dolly never considered it a romantically written tune. It was composed as a sentimental gesture, in reference to Dolly having broken her ties with Country Music legend, Porter Wagoner, who was her mentor and launched Dolly to stardom. She had been under contract to Wagoner for seven years and when she broke away from Wagoner’s authority, there was a bitter lawsuit, with claims of rights to songs and other issues relating to a percentage of money owed. Dolly would in time, settle her dispute with the one man she always would credit with having discovered her abilities and gave her the break she needed to get into the music industry. While most won’t actually rate Dolly so great a singer, she is without question, one of the finest composers of the Country Music genre, barring none! Her immense output of songs is in many ways, part of her legend.{font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}Then, something extraordinary occurred in 1982. This was the period Dolly was breaking into motion pictures. She had already made a big splash in the comedy “9 to 5” two years earlier. Next in line, would be a big musical film version of the Broadway show, “The Best Little Whorehouse in {font}{font:Arial}Texas{font}{font:Arial}.” Throughout her career in films, Dolly has it stipulated in her contract that she is given the option to write a song for the movie she appears in; this usually means the movie’s theme or title tune. Although, the 1982 musical already had original songs, Dolly banked on a revamp of “I Will Always Love You” for her to sing in the movie. The new version was then turned into a single that when released, hit at number one on the Country Music charts! This turned out to be a momentous event in the history of the music industry, because it was the very first time, a song that was originally written and performed by the same person, hit up at number one a second time on the music charts! This was truly remarkable as well as a feat that has for the longest time not been publicized much.{font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}Comes 1992 and the film “The Bodyguard,” well Dolly as of now has what some believe a record (in this case a ranking!) that will probably never be broken!! The Whitney Houston version of “I Will Always Love You,” gave Dolly her third time up at number one on the charts! This meant for the very first time, a 3rd ranking at number one of a song by the same composer! Dolly is also the only composer to have had the same song, crossover from Country Music to the Pop Music charts at number one! However you want to view the situation, it is for the record (no pun intended!) astounding and Dolly considers it her finest of achievements. She also has always given much admiration to Whitney’s version of a song that was turned into one of the most popular romantic ballads in the history of American entertainment. Since Whitney’s tremendous success with the song and becoming her signature piece, Dolly has gladly accepted this issue. The strangest of all circumstances about “I Will Always Love You” was that it was never intended to be in or the love theme of “The Bodyguard.” What happened was Whitney was supposed to sing as the theme, another famous song, “What Becomes of The Broken Hearted.” It was then discovered that the song had already appeared in a previous film. It was co-star Kevin Costner, who suggested to Whitney that she hear Linda Ronstadt’s cover version of Dolly’s song. Immediately, Whitney fell in love with the tune. It was then arranged into a romantic “soul” ballad.{font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}I thought it was very poignant to hear that when Jennifer Hudson sang “I Will Always Love You,” at the Grammy Awards, Dolly was brought to tears and really felt her little song had touched the heart and soul of the world at large. In a sad way of thinking, the song perhaps relates to Whitney’s tragic death, in that we now will have to find it in our hearts to understand her agonies, while we accept her magical talent and voice, filling the air with a harmony that doesn’t come around very often. Whitney is now with the likes of Judy Garland and Billie Holiday, to become a legend to her generation of fans that will keep the flames of her talent alive. Her voice is now one that goes beyond a comparison to others. In the end, it’s Whitney Houston the singer that counts the most and we must hope that she finds ever lasting peace to a soul that while singing kept us inspired, even though there was pain lingering within the splendor of her talent. The pain and sorrow of her life has taken her away from the earth, but the radiance of her talent will live on for all of us.{font}

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was lovely, Herr Professor.

 

Only one thing I'd point out: you say Dolly hasn't been necessarily known for her tremendous vocals, check out her splendid Bluegrass version of the Eagles tune The Seven Bridges Road from her excellent album Little Sparrow.

 

To me, the greatest song Whitney Houston ever did was Your Love is My Love, the title track off of her 1999 album. It's a wonderful, subtle, gorgeous, vaguely reggae-influenced song that she performs wonderfully, without all the vocal loop-de-loos and five minutes of Cece Winans-esque vamping she became somewhat prone to when performing live in her later years.

 

 

It was then and has remained utterly ignored in critical and commercial terms- played once on MTV then dropped, never played on the radio and not brought up in the wake of this terrible sadness.

 

 

But it is one of my favorite songs ever and a prophetic line from it sums this whole mess up in a wonderfully eloquent way:

 

 

"If I should die this very day, don't cry, 'cause on earth I wasn't meant to stay. But no matter what the people say, I'll be waiting for you after the Judgement Day. 'Cause Your Love is my love and my love is your love, it would take an eternity to break us, and the chains of Amistad couldn't hold us."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as befits a hero and a martyr and a soon-to-be-canonized saint, your hero and mine:

 

h1. Should flags fly at half-staff for Whitney Houston?

http://entertainment.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/15/10415956-should-flags-fly-at-half-staff-for-whitney-houston

 

 

I say the day of her funeral should be a national holiday, the flags over the White House should be lowered as well, we should all observe a moment of silence for this great and wonderful hero, and oh, they should name a drink after her, made up of Xanax and Tequila.

 

What say you all?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In an eerily similar coincidence, when Jim Morrison of the Doors was found dead, he was also in the bathtub. And he also had a history of drug and alcohol abuse.

 

Apropos of nothing, on Saturday afternoon I was standing on the checkout line of the supermarket, and with the long wait I was glancing at the magazines on the racks. I didn't recognize most of the faces there, but Whitney Houston happened to be on the cover of one of the tabloids. So I was looking at her and thinking about what a great singer she was and how it was too bad that her life was spiralling downward... Later that afternoon the news broke out that she was pronounced dead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}Governor Christie's reasons for having the flags lowered made sense and he came across as a very compassionate person. The family was always proud to be from New Jersey and the funeral will be there. He's right; "There but for the grace..."{font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=willbefree25 wrote:}{quote}as befits a hero and a martyr and a soon-to-be-canonized saint, your hero and mine:

>

> h1. Should flags fly at half-staff for Whitney Houston?

> http://entertainment.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/15/10415956-should-flags-fly-at-half-staff-for-whitney-houston

>

> I say the day of her funeral should be a national holiday, the flags over the White House should be lowered as well, we should all observe a moment of silence for this great and wonderful hero, and oh, they should name a drink after her, made up of Xanax and Tequila.

>

> What say you all?

>

Since you ask, willbefree25, I'd say that your sentiments are offensively disrespectful as well as sadly misdirected.

 

If you are in fact outraged by New Jersey's flags flying at half-staff in Whitney Houston's honor, your gripe is with Governor Christie.

 

Whitney had nothing to do with it because -- at only 48 years old and regardless of the cause -- *she is dead*.

 

Also, you appear to be inferring that any public expressions of grief following a performer's death should somehow be mitigated by that performer's use of drugs and/or alcohol.

 

If that's the case, does it apply retroactively to, say, the deaths of Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland, William Holden, Michael Jackson, Heath Ledger, John Belushi, Wallace Reid, Janis Joplin, River Phoenix, Montgomery Clift, Dorothy Dandridge, W.C. Fields, John Barrymore, Brad Renfro, Barbara LaMarr, Freddie Prinz, Elvis Presley, Chris Farley, Sam Kinison, John Gilbert, Margaux Hemingway, Inger Stevens, Alma Rubens, Jim Morrison, Lenny Bruce, Jimi Hendrix, or any of the many other performers whose deaths were drug/alcohol related ?

 

Finally, I'd say that whether or not one is a Whitney Houston fan and regardless of one's personal opinions about her life, death, singing styile, or whether or not she picked her nose, the fact that *she is dead* is a tragedy and deserves to be treated with a modicum of respect.

 

All of the foregoing is offered with the disclaimer that my opinions are those of a much earlier time and are therefore so old-fashioned as to be virtually obsolete in today's world.

 

No offense intended, willbefree25, and I hope none taken.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...