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Looney Tunes


Janet0312
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{font:Times New Roman}In “Showbiz Bugs” Daffy volunteers to be sawed in half by Bugs. Daffy does his best to ruin the act, telling the audience that the whole thing is a hoax. But when Daffy comes out of the box, jumping up and down yelling at the audience not to applaud, the top half is indeed separated from his bottom half. When he finally realizes what’s happened to him he says, “Hmm… It’s a good thing I’ve got Blue Cross.” Oh, man, that line just kills me.{font}

 

 

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Hoo boy, I'll say. I grew up on them, on television that is. Ahead of their time, and written for adults. The takeoff on Now Voyager was hilarious, as were the caricatures of Bogey and Edward G. in the one at the nightclub.

 

The WWII ones with the Gremlin? The dog who fell in love with Daisy the iron dog who was turned into a bomb?

 

Bugs in drag - funny stuff, along with Daffy in general - Wabbit Season!

 

Brilliant cartoons, outdone only just by Monty Python.

 

Anybody remember the one with the dog who went around saying "what makes me so mad?" - he showed us what made him so mad at the end..........but I can't remember what it was!

 

Funny sidenotes: Seinfeld singing the Overture theme at the opera, and Larry David's casting of Rachel Dratch singing The Merry Go Round Broke Down theme.

 

Nah, I didn't watch them.......... :)

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I'm pretty sure the Cartoon Network runs them at certain times... They are still the greatest cartoons ever put on film. They were made for adults and to this day I will watch them and laugh till it hurts.. The DVD's WB put out are priceless and unedited. A lot of the ones from the 40's and 50's are edited for content.... :^0

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Thanks fred. I just found it on Directv channel 296. There is a Tom and Jerry playing right now, but the copyright date is 1961. That's just not the same.

 

I think I would place a cut-off date for cartoons, for me, at the end of 1949, with the late '30s and the 1940s being the best years for cartoons.

 

I interviewed Mel Blanc back in the late 1970s. He was a wonderful guy and so friendly. As he spoke, I could hear many of the voices coming out of him at once. It was like speaking to a relative of Bugs, Daffy, and the others. Those voices were naturally in him. You can hear his own voice on some of the old Jack Benny shows on TV on YouTube.

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You did? Oh, I loved Mel Blanc, what a talent. He was also Jack Benny's car, and the 'si', 'sy' sketch is hilarious even now.

 

His son took over for him (right?) but it's not the same.

 

You can tell the later Warner's cartoons by the cheapened background graphics, and the dumbing down of the humor.

 

 

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You know, I was considering starting a thread about animation. Me and a bunch of "cartoon freaks" talked at lenght about animation and came to an agreement. That while the Warner cartoons were definitley more entertaining, Disney's animation was superior. Disney worked so hard and long at perfecting the fluidity of the animation, while still trying to maintain a level of fiscal efficiency. He finally suceeded. In fact, we still prefer the old Disney work to much of the Pixar stuff, even though it was agreed that Pixar animation is pretty cool.

 

Anyway, much of the CGI animation using people as models (with the ping-pong balls attached to them)still falls short somehow. But in the end we ALL agreed that we CANNOT stomach that oxymoron known as "Japanese animation". I personally find it hard, after being raised on "Looney Toons" and Disney, to find anything acceptable about Anime.

 

Plus, being a life long Michigander, I have a soft spot for Michigan J. Frog! The best of the Looney Toon treasury.

 

Sepiatone

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Sepiatone: Anyway, much of the CGI animation using people as models (with the ping-pong balls attached to them)still falls short somehow. But in the end we ALL agreed that we CANNOT stomach that oxymoron known as "Japanese animation". I personally find it hard, after being raised on "Looney Toons" and Disney, to find anything acceptable about Anime.

 

 

 

Oh, I sooooooo agree on that, although I did enjoy Kimba, the White Lion in my youth.

 

I was just reading in Steve Schneider's book, "That's All Folks" that Warners shut down the animation department when the 3-D craze hit. They figured that it would cost way too much money to make cartoons in 3-D. Chuck Jones went over to Disney, but only stayed four months, because Disney had to approve every little thing and it drove Jones nuts. He ended up back at Warners when they opened the animation department up again, obviously.

 

Michigan J. Frog was Jones' fave. He and Michael Maltese wrote "The Michigan Rag". I think "One Froggy Evening" is a favorite of many.

 

Edited by: Janet0312 on Feb 10, 2012 2:13 PM

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Michigan J. Frog is indeed one of the all time favorites.

But along with Bugs, Daffy, Yosemite Sam, Elmer Fudd and all the other great ones, I think my all time favorite if Foghorn Leghorn..He had some of the greatest one-liners of all time....

 

That Foghorn J. Leghorn,boy"

"That's a joke, I say, That's a joke, Son"

"I keep throwing em', but you keep missing"

"That boy is about as sharp as a bowling ball"

" Boys like a dead horse----no get up and go"

"That girls like the road between Fort Worth and Dallas .......No curves"

 

And one that never made it to TV

"That boy is so dumb....... He thinks the Mexican border pay rent"....... :^0

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I have a Michigan J. Frog hanging from my windshield.

 

Another good book to read is Chuck Amuck.

 

In the 1990's the Disney Stores were very popular stores and always crowded. At least in the Disney Store where I worked. Warner Bros decided to do a similar arrangement in the malls that had Disney Stores. Both stores had a large and varied assortment of stuff. I spent much more than I ever made at those stores but now I do have quite a collection of all the old vintage cartoons and books for Disney and Warner Bros. They never fail to bring a smile to my face. Sometimes just reading the titles.

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I don't think there was ever as many of the WB Studio Stores as there were Disney Stores. However, I think they made up for it by having showcase stores in the bigger cities. For example, they had a HUGE store on Fifth Ave in NYC, right net to FAO Schwartz, which was like five stories!!

 

All the stuff was very high quality, and its a shame that somebody in the Warners executive suite decided that they were not making enough of a profit on them, and started shutting them around 2000 or so....

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It was in 1991, Turner and MGM/UA Video, released a 5 volume box set entitled, "The Golden Age of Looney Tunes" on Laser Disc. This video series was never released on VHS! Each box contained 5 discs, ten sides. The total amount of cartoon shorts were 338. This was for its time, the largest and most ambitious video series produced. The 5 volume box set was sold on a limited basis, meaning that it wouldn't be repeated or reissued, once the series was over. After Laser Disc was phased out of the market and DVD took over, there was this waiting game among fans who wanted see the original Laser Disc series transfered to digital. Well, in 2006, that's just what Warner Brothers Home Video did. However, there were changes made, in that the title was now "Looney Tunes - Golden Collection," and there were more cartoon shorts added. The number of DVD boxes are at 6, with four DVD discs to each box. This now brings the new total of shorts to 356! Unlike the Laser Disc release, the entire collection of cartoons for the DVD were even fully restored! *They look beautiful!*

 

 

 

Sadly, the series on DVD is now, I repeat, *now out of print*. If you want it, there are still a reasonable amount of copies floating around, but these will probably disappear soon enough. Once the current supply has been brought up, it will be almost impossible for any store or distributor to order any new copies. The existing supply is now priced at anywhere from $130.00 to just under $200.00. I didn't waste anytime and quickly brought my copy. I even have the original Laser Disc set! Anyway, I think this is the most convenient and exhilarating way of having most of the best Looney Tunes and Merry Melodies of classic animation. In the last six years, I had an annual Looney Tunes party at my house. Friends and neighbors gather around and bring their grandchildren. But, it's really the old folks (like me!) who get a real big knick out of watching cartoons that still have a way of thrilling us and bringing back wonderful memories. . ."Da-da-da. . .That's All Folks!"

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*One Froggy Evening* (1955) and my personal favorite, *Ali Baba Bunny* (1957), are just two examples as to why I disagree with FredCDobbs' earlier opinion when he said the prime of cartoon art ceased by 1950.

 

These two WB shorts to me represent the zenith of the art. Not only is the background art beautiful stylized in a modern or postmodern manner, but the characters involved in the storyline have been animated so exactly as to show every emotion and body movement involved in the action as fully realistic and believable.

 

And not only that, but the dialogue written for the latter short in particular was not only absurdist in its approach, but was also, well, extremely funny.

 

 

(..and so in closing....HASSAN CHOP!!!!). ;)

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> {quote:title=MovieProfessor wrote:}{quote}

>

> Sadly, the series on DVD is now, I repeat, *now out of print*. If you want it, there are still a reasonable amount of copies floating around, but these will probably disappear soon enough. Once the current supply has been brought up, it will be almost impossible for any store or distributor to order any new copies. The existing supply is now priced at anywhere from $130.00 to just under $200.00. I didn't waste anytime and quickly brought my copy. I even have the original Laser Disc set! Anyway, I think this is the most convenient and exhilarating way of having most of the best Looney Tunes and Merry Melodies of classic animation.

>

Your information is incomplete. Recently, WB issued volume one of the Looney Tunes Platinum Collection on Blu-ray. This collection has 50 of the cartoons in high definition and they look better than they did on DVD. The set also has thirty-seven audio commentaries, seventeen alternate audio programs, three documentaries, eleven featurettes, nineteen bonus shorts, and a 52-page Digibook.

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