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White-black movies


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Some differences, of course, but I saw The Tuskegee Airmen a few nights ago and it reminded me of a couple of John Wayne WWII flying movies. The Tuskegee Airmen is actually a made-for-TV movie, but it's very good, and very sad too. Quite interesting. It should have been made 50 years ago.

 

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220px-Tuskegee-airmen-DVDcover.jpg

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I saw these a few weeks apart, and I was surprised at how similar the stories are. Crimson Tide can almost be called a re-make of Hell Below, with Denzel Washington playing the Robert Montgomery role.

 

Hell Below (1933)

On a later patrol, (Robert) Montgomery violates orders to maintain silence to start a battle Huston wanted to avoid.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0024100/plotsummary

Hell+Below.jpg

 

 

 

Crimson Tide (1995)

On a US nuclear missile sub, a young first officer (Denzel Washington) stages a mutiny to prevent his trigger happy captain from launching his missiles before confirming his orders to do so.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112740/

Crimson-Tide-(1995)-picture-MOV_6424416e

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}It's Black history month, Whitney's in the news, and I don't remember seeing a thread on here that addresses white characters that turn black in American motion pictures.

>

 

Well there is Melvin Van Peebles' 1970 film *Watermelon Man*, where a white bigot turns black.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066550/

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}It's Black history month, Whitney's in the news, and I don't remember seeing a thread on here that addresses white characters that turn black in American motion pictures.

I think you more accurately mean that are portrayed by black actors in remakes...not white characters that become black, as in *Watermelon Man* or *Black Like Me* (James Whitmore).

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Thanks...I was thinking about some of the remakes Eddie Murphy did. He took Rex Harrison's role for an updated DR. DOLITTLE and Jerry Lewis' role in THE NUTTY PROFESSOR.

Will Smith has also done it twice:

 

*I, Robot* (previously done with a white actor on the original Outer Limits)

 

51BX7WCPQ5L._SL500_AA300_.jpgouter-limits-i-robot-leonard-nimoy-vhs-c

 

 

*I Am Legend* (previously done as *The Last Man On Earth*, with Vincent Price)

 

 

i-am-legend-poster_1.jpglast-man-on-earth.jpgposter%20last%20man%20on%20earth%20dvd%2

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My memory may be slipping, but as I recall BLACULA, he was an African Prince played by a black actor who is bitten by Dracula. Then we segue to contemporary times and he's on the prowl again.

 

For me, it was a blaxploitation spin on the character and while not exactly a faithful retelling of Stoker, in reality most other film versions weren't either.

 

I've never seen BLACKENSTEIN but I figured it worthy of inclusion as it is an attempt to rip off a theme associated with whites and fashion it for a black audience.

 

Oh, here's another four that come to mind:

 

GET CARTER = HIT MAN

 

THE ASPHALT JUNGLE = COOL BREEZE

 

ODD MAN OUT = THE LOST MAN

 

THE INFORMER = UP TIGHT!

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> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}My memory may be slipping, but as I recall BLACULA, he was an African Prince played by a black actor who is bitten by Dracula. Then we segue to contemporary times and he's on the prowl again.

Stiil, it has virtually nothing to do with Stoker, and again, it's not a black actor portraying the character of Dracula...if that were the case then yes it would qualify, but it doesn't. Same reason Blackenstein doesn't count. Neither does the film Abby, often referred to as "black exorcist"....because it was a wholly original story and had NOTHING at all to do with The Exorcist, having only a theme of possession. That along does not qualify it.

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>I figured it worth of inclusion as it is an attempt to rip off a theme associated with whites and fashion it for a black audience.

 

That is how I would define the trend, too. These are remakes geared for a niche market, in this case the African American population.

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Whew! Thanks to your quote, I spotted an error in typing in which I was lucky enough not to have thrown back at me.

 

As far as the two horror films go, here the "source" material was obvious in the title, regardless of whether or not they were faithful adaptaions or not. The titles more or less screamed that they were twisting the material to fit.

 

 

 

 

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