Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Most beautifully photographed film ( in color)


doctorxx
 Share

Recommended Posts

As I said in an earlier thread, the best looking color film is The Adventures of Robin Hood (Incidentally, the one film which always seems to have a good print. Even Gone With the Wind has some less than stellar prints.). Black Orpheus would come in a close second. As for use of color, I would consider Black Orpheus again, or The Black Stallion, or Black Narcissus or Funny Face (especially for the photo sequence, which I think is the best use of color in film), but for overall appearance and use of color in a film I would eventually settle on The Red Shoes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The subject of color in a film is a heated topic in this house as I am a paint conservator who deals with color & MrTeek is color blind. He hates the look of Technicolor films and I lurve them. At first, even I was kind of put off by the fake look these films have, but somehow recently embraced them.

They have an "otherworldly, dreamy" effect - exactly where I want some movies to take me. The first I noticed the impact the color had was in Reap The Wild Wind, what a "look"!

 

I recently designed a Sabu "Triple Feature" Box Set that includes: Thief Of Bagdad, Arabian Nights & Black Narcissus - wow!

 

Wish TCM would show Umbrellas of Cherbourg again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first impression color had on me was in some of those iconic 50's sci-fi movies like "War of The Worlds", "Forbidden Planet", "This Island Earth" and "When Worlds Collide". The posters always emphasized the color factor and they did not disappoint. That generation of sci-fi really evoked the garish, primary color schemes of the comic books we were all reading at the time. The OP stated that composition should also be part of the criteria, so I guess I'd go with "War of The Worlds" overall. The color in that one was both primary and oddly diffused, giving the whole thing a kind of wierd glow, perfect for the subject. Even a cheapie like "The Blob" was given a boost by the garish colors. Some sci-fi was perfect for black-and-white cinematography, but it's those big, over-the-top candy-colored extravaganzas that I'll always love the most.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are some great film photography coming out of China these days. I recently seen a film called "mongol" and while the story line can be somewhat confusing because of my struggling to follow the subtitles the photography was breathtaking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Color and composition? Hmmm... So many factors figure into this one. My tastes lean towards *Ben Hur* and *The Godfather* . Brilliant use of Technicolor and lighting PLUS composition. Notably with the intereor shots.

 

 

Cardiff's use of color was too agressive to me. But his composition was brilliant!

 

 

*The Greatest Story Ever Told* made great use of it as well. And say what you like about GWTW, that scene where Gable picks up Leigh and carries her up the red carpeted stairway? About the best combo of technicolor, lighting and composition one can witness. Then there's *The Wizard of Oz* ...

 

 

Now...ask me which of my two daughters I love the most!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most films shot in Todd-AO and Super Panavision 70.

 

I like to mention a couple of movies we normally don't think about.

 

"Twister" (1996) I have a LaserDisc of the movie and love the aerial shots and the sharp colors.

 

There is a low budget, mostly forgotten movie "The Soggy Bottom Gang" (1981) had the most sharpest Panavision shots. I watched it at my downtown theatre and the manager even complimented he has never seen such a sharp bold widescreen movie of that type. Even not-so-hot films should be recognised far as cinematography is concerned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ones I consider most beautiful of those already mentioned:

 

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Meet Me in St. Louis

The Wizard of Oz

Leave Her to Heaven

Black Narcissus - I first saw this years ago on a portable black & white television and had no idea it was actually in color until I saw it again on TCM last year

 

The Black Stallion, Black Orpheus, and those 1950s sci-fi movies are great suggestions too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm getting the impression, based on many of the replies here, that people are misunderstanding the point of the original post's question, which was Most Beautifully Photographed Film (in Color), NOT Most Beautiful COLOR in a film (for which there's already an existing thread somewhere here on the forums).

 

Just because a film has a lovely use of COLOR doesn't necessarily make it a wonderfully PHOTOGRAPHED film...many examples cited here seem to have been cited because of the look of the color...many were cited in the other thread about the best COLOR in a film (Red Shoes, for example).

 

I also reacted to the one example below when someone cited Twister, thinking that "the color is actually somewhat desaturated in that film for obvious reasons of the storms depicted...no really vivid colors"...until I realized the person was referring to the PHOTOGRAPHY and the camerwork in the film (which was obviously made in color)...which is outstanding.

 

BTW...I'd give a vote to The Phantom of The Opera (2004), which was nominated for Best Cinematography. Beautiful, sweeping, floating, and almost lyrical camerawork (in color!). :^0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're splitting hairs. The first post says, "...both color and composition."

 

Are you really saying The Red Shoes isn't a wonderfully shot and composed film regardless of its brilliant color? First time I've ever heard that.

 

What if the quality and use of the color is precisely WHY the photography is effective to begin with? French Cancan is studio-bound and intentionally artificial; the wonder of the cinematography is in the way Renoir moves color around. That's why it's good. These things aren't mutually exclusive at all.

 

 

Practically every film mentioned in this thread is justifiable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=JonasEB wrote:}{quote}

>

> Are you really saying The Red Shoes isn't a wonderfully shot and composed film regardless of its brilliant color? First time I've ever heard that.

>

No I did NOT say that...you're applying your own interpretation with something I never suggested. What I said was:

 

"many were cited in the other thread about the best COLOR in a film (Red Shoes, for example)"

 

Which means I simply pointed out that Red Shoes was brought up in the thread about best color in a film. I NEVER said nor suggested it wasn't wonderfully shot and composed. I only pointed out the film's inclusion in the Color thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Calamity wrote:}{quote}The ones I consider most beautiful of those already mentioned:

>

> The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

> Meet Me in St. Louis

> The Red Shoes

> The Wizard of Oz

> Leave Her to Heaven

> The Adventures of Robin Hood

> Black Narcissus - I first saw this years ago on a portable black & white television and had no idea it was actually in color until I saw it again on TCM last year

Many people only ever saw Wizard of Oz on black and white sets for many years after it made its television debut.

 

Surprised about your Black Narcissus comment....or any similar comment to the effect of "had no idea it was made in color"...when the opening credits of a color movie (especially an older film) will say "Technicolor" (or some such reference to it being in color) right at the beginning of a movie. Technicolor would often also get it own title screen in a movie too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

". . . .color and composition. . . ."

 

Meaning to me the way color is used in a film, along with the other elements of composition, to create the desired effects. I remain with my original list:

 

The Red Shoes

Funny Face

Black Orpheus

Black Narcissus

The Black Stallion

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote}

> Surprised about your Black Narcissus comment....or any similar comment to the effect of "had no idea it was made in color"...when the opening credits of a color movie (especially an older film) will say "Technicolor" (or some such reference to it being in color) right at the beginning of a movie. Technicolor would often also get it own title screen in a movie too.

I was probably about 14 when I first saw it and don't remember if I paid attention to the opening credits or not :) . But if I had, they either didn't register with me or I'd forgotten them.

 

My mom made me see Phantom of the Opera with her. I do remember the snowy scene was very beautiful. Wait, there was a snowy scene, wasn't there?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote} Just because a film has a lovely use of COLOR doesn't necessarily make it a wonderfully PHOTOGRAPHED film...many examples cited here seem to have been cited because of the look of the color...many were cited in the other thread about the best COLOR in a film (Red Shoes, for example).

Well if you didn't intend it to, it does read that way. In context of the argument you're making, there's no qualification that would indicate otherwise. It would have made more sense to cite a film in that spot that you think relies on color alone and not on composition.

 

You've made a distinction in your initial post but didn't offer any example from the thread of what is merely "good color" vs. "good cinematography (in color)".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=JonasEB wrote:}{quote} Well if you didn't intend it to, it does read that way.

To you it does, maybe....I certainly put NO such implication in it. One of the very unfortunate things about the internet...people read whatever they want to in their own minds, regardless of how something is spelled out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...