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Question about morals (messages) in "42nd Street" and "Cavalcade" (1933)


ASiy05
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Is there a moral (message) in "42nd Street" and "Cavalcade" (this is the "Cavalcade" I'm referring to, not the 2005 film: [http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/'>http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/'>http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/'>http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/|http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/]? If yes, what is it?

 

* For example, the moral of The Tortoise and the Hare is "Slow and steady wins the race". And the moral (theme) of King Kong is "No matter how tough you are, love can make you soft". [http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/Z4mW9jlD7kY/|http://us.mg5.mail.yahoo.com/wiki/Special:Contributions/98.234.170.206|Special:Contributions/98.234.170.206]

 

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42nd Street:

 

The public only sees the surface.

True artistic merit goes unrecognized.

If you don't look out for yourself, nobody else will.

If you can't act, can't sing, and can't dance, you can become a great star if the exigncies of the movie require it.

 

 

I've always thought it was one of the great ironies in film that Ginger Rogers, who more than anyone else in the cast was actually able to fill Bebe Daniels shoes, argued for Ruby Keeler to take the lead in Pretty Lady.

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