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The Grapes of Wrath


bundie
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I know some of y'all experts will be able to explain something that's always bothered me. When the Joads set out for california there was another young man with them, a stocky, dark-haired fellow. He was with them at the scene when the men bathed in the water. I can't remember if he was there when they stopped at their first camp, but I didn't see him after that. When Connie "lit out," no one said anything about anyone else going with him. At the second camp Tom says there were four men: That would be himself, Pa, Al, and Uncle John. So what happened to that guy? Anybody know?

 

BLU

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Yes, but I'm not talking about Connie. I'm talking about the other guy, whose name I don't know, who is dark-haired and stocky. I don't know where his place was in the family. He's the one I'm trying to find out what happened to. I know who Connie is and that he left. I also know Preacher and what happened to him. It's the dark-haired, stocky young man I don't know what happened to.

 

Does anyone know?

 

BLU

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bundie wrote:That might be him! Do you know about what point this is said in the movie? Amazing I miss it every time!

 

BLU

 

I would be BLU- too if I were you. Why don't you just record this thing, once and for all, so that you don't have to be amazed by missing it *every time*? Which is a whole, whole lot of times........

 

musikone

(just trying to be helpful)

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According to the book, he stays at the river while the rest of the family goes on to California.

 

Funny thing about this... I've seen the movie many times, but I've never noticed him in the film and I've never noticed him missing. :)

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They should have brought along them fishin poles and caught some fish to eat, also Ma never lost a pound the whole trip she is so tough, lol.

 

PS This is another post-code movie I wonder how it got past the censors, Henry Fonda kills a cop and gets away with it.

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Thank you Fred for posting that photo. Yes, that is the man who just seems to disappear halfway through the movie.

 

To whomever suggested I record the movie...I already made a DVD of it. But that man still seems to disappear. Apparently this is just what happens, with no explanation. I guess no movie is flawless. But this is awfully Plan 9 From Outer Space for such a quality film.

 

BLU

 

 

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> This is another post-code movie I wonder how it got past the censors, Henry Fonda kills a cop and gets away with it.

 

The guy that Tom kills wasn't a cop, he was a vigilante. Back then, historically speaking, the cops used vigilantes to their advantage against the Oakies and unions.

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> I couldn't find my copy of the movie but did read a synopsis and it says the guys that confront Henry Fonda had stars on their coats before he kills one. I don't think vigilantes had that unless I am mistaken.

 

 

I'm reading Kevin Starr's multi-book history of California. According to his book, Endangered Dreams (which centers on California in the 1930s), police in California often "deputized" vigilantes to give legitimacy to the thuggery they practiced.

 

Edited by: lzcutter because it wasn't just small town leos

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Hamradio, this minor character's name was Noah Joad. He was part of the Joad family.

 

Anyway, I got my answer. He disappeared in the middle, the way characters sometimes do. The same thing happened just the other night in the Troy Donahue flick Parrish, when Edgar's wife vanishes mid-movie and is never seen again, even at family birthday parties.

 

BLU

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I'm reading Kevin Starr's multi-book history of California. According to his book, Endangered Dreams (which centers on California in the 1930s), police in California often "deputized" vigilantes to give legitimacy to the thuggery they practiced .

 

The link below is to a poster website (disclosure: It's mine), but the book whose cover it depicts is a powerful expose of all those strikebreaking techniques, which were Big Business indeed in the 1930's. These strikebreaking outfits were used not just by companies, but also by many states, counties and cities, including New York. And yes, the use of phony "deputies" as a mask was indeed a commonplace practice.

 

http://www.georgetownbookshop.com/display2.asp?id=240

 

And the book itself for sale on abebooks:

 

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&dj=on&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&tn=ibreakstrikes&x=0&y=0

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A few years back, I went to a series: "It's Great to be Nominated", at the Academy of Motion Pictures' Samuel Goldwyn Theater, representing films that were nominated for Best Picture but did not win.

 

"The Grapes of Wrath", nominated in 1940, was shown with the actors that played Rose of Sharon (since deceased), Ruthie, and Winfield on hand. They pointed out that the only time the principals left the set was when they bathed in the Colorado River. All the long shots of the car on the road were shot with doubles and the close ups were done with backdrops.

 

As for Tom Joad escaping, this was in direct violation of the Motion Picture Code that decried that all criminals had to meet punishment. "I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang" was a Pre Code film.

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I shake my head everytime I think about how much money corporate America wasted in hiring thugs to break the unions. Would've been cheaper just to let 'em organize.

 

 

When you add the devastation of the dust bowl to the '30's economic depression, times MUST have been hard! Kudos to all involved for making this film capture it all so well. And I've met a few old "Okies", and seems to me that the accents were spot on. Children should be made to view this film to remind them that there are worse things than to not have the latest hand-held device, and all those sabre rattlers should view it to remind THEM that no matter how great they think this nation is, there was a time when we weren't so great and we treated too many of our own, suffering circumstances beyond their control, as if they were disposable trash to be shunned and scorned.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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