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Fatal (or Not!) Attraction


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:wub: Oopsie! 

 

Sixes, I revived this old thread and posted the new question, having viewed the movie again a couple of days ago.  (I also posted a question suggested from the material in the 'first film that comes to mind' thread.)  Then I re-read the entire thread, and was reminded that P.M. had been used earlier.  I figured lavender would spot it and answer, but you got here first.

 

Your thread.

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flash, sorry didn't see this one or would have answered. funny thing is, one of my kids and I were just talking about this film yesterday. My kids and I watched this one together when it first was released. I believe it's being shown on tv this week.

 

mr6, Your thread

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

(378 Views)

He is a 'Man of Respect' in a setting where that phrase has a special meaning.  He has a Family under his command.  Occasionally he kills, and he has the power to order others to kill.  But he has to move very carefully if he contemplates a dalliance outside marriage.  His wife is vigilant, possessive and impulsive.  Late 1980s.  Color.

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A loyal henchman of the boss dies in the line of uh, work.  The boss forms plans concerning the grieving young widow, who has a young son.  The boss shows all proper respect and care publicly, but there is still the wife, who is prone to go into "super ex-girlfriend" mode (minus the wild talents) when she gets suspicious.  The widow moves from her fairly comfortable suburban setting into the inner city and starts to work as a hair stylist.

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In the plot parallel to the Don and his dalliance, a Federal law officer goes undercover, trying to collect evidence.  Represents himself to the young widow as her concerned neighbor.  He, too, is attracted to the young woman.

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Action shifts from Brooklyn to a Miami hotel location under the Don's manipulations.  The Feds are monitoring, and the suspicious wife follows.  Slapstick confrontations, with weapons threatening.

 

The Don:  Child actor who's career continued in adulthood.  Supporting role in a well-regarded series that lasted several years.  Best Supporting Actor nomination for this role.

 

The widow:  In an unusual comic role here, but already established as one of the great beauties in the industry, as well as a talented performer.

 

Late 1980s.

 

Bad Guys get arrested.  The Don's final shot:  The wife is still getting closer, and he is shocked awake in his cell when (in his nightmare) she actually gets to him.  The FBI Agent and the widow have a future.

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Correct   To a historian or an anthropologist, 1988 is a generation ago.  I'm comfortable with that. 

 

Michelle  Pfeiffer (widow), Dean Stockwell (The Don), Matthew Modine ( FBI Agt.) Mercedes Rhuel (Don's wife).  Good "Godfather" satire.

 

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This attraction does turn fatal.  A young woman from a work camp is befriended by a prisoner from a chain gang prison farm.  She helps him escape, but in doing so she is bitten by a poisonous snake and dies in a swamp.  Can you name the movie, as well as the actor and actress ?

 

 

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Thanks, Miles.  Mention of the swamp location is what helped me lock it in.  Next up:

 

British film.  Late 1980s.  Contemporary to the time of filming, in that some of the characters are veterans of the Falklands conflict.  A marriage across class lines.  The husband is of the titled Nobility, the wife is a beauty and a trophy, or at least it seems she was meant to be.  The husband's family set a pose of welcoming her to the family, but there are cracks in that façade. 

 

Formerly a fashion model, the wife has made a place for herself in the business end of Fashion, and she shines there.  Charming, organized, competent, she works well with all, and she is effective.  Her Titled husband is the one who is uncomfortable with the life they have maneuvered into.  One title in UK, another in USA.

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(553)

The wife absolutely adores her young son, and she's upset by the fact that the lad is soon to be shipped off to boarding school, as is the custom in this class of society.  In her business dealings and the resulting social contacts, she is poised, but also outgoing.  It is very effective in making contacts, negotiating, and persuading.  It succeeds in business, but it also makes her husband resentful.  It seems that she is showing affectionate attention to others that should come only to him.  A delivery boy that brings a stack of mail is received with pleasant banter that she would call getting along with others, but the husband seems to regard it as flirting.  He fears that others will think so as well.

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The husband attends a dinner party with his fellow Guards officers; it segues into a drunken bash.  Driving home afterward, his mates with him in his expensive car,  he spots a woman on the street -- tall, blonde,  seems well-dressed -- and he swerves and hits and kills her.  At a quick look in the headlights on a dark street, she looked something like his wife.  The carful of drunks stop, look, see that the victim is dead.  They quickly decide to leave and to cover up the incident.

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There is a weak link in the efforts to keep the killing covered up. -- A young man who is former classmate and presently the boyfriend of the husband's sister.  Good student and rising young businessman, but he was a Scholarship lad, and risen from the Outsider class.  He has a conscience, and he wants to own up to the accidental killing.  He tells his girlfriend about the accident, and the coverup, and the following secret repairs to the car involved in the incident.  The sister is no big fan of her brother, and she hates her sister-in-law, but she will not be an ally with this Outsider in bringing her brother trouble.

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The Outsider guy does go to the police and report the accident.  The police do question the Aristos, virtually hat-In-hand, get their denials, and go away.  And they now know of the potential danger to their coverup, and his girlfriend has named him.

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Eleven days; slightly over 100 Views...

 

A party is in progress on the husband's estate, and the Scholarship lad is not invited.  He shows up anyway, and asks to talk to the husband.  The husband is talking with others in an inner room, and is not receiving.  The husband's friends gather around him in a menacing manner, joking about a "party crasher."

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The opening shot of this film is a view-from-above of a coastal area:  A high cliff, with a drop down to a narrow beach and a dead body, adult male, lying on the sand.  That scene is now repeated, with an added detail shot showing that the dead body is the "party crasher" from the previous scene. 

 

On another thread, one devoted to the sources of quotes, I made reference to a prominent reviewer's commentary on this film, that included a quote from a respected English actor about the life styles of the British upper classes.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just over 260 Views, no guesses; closing the question.

1989.  British title Diamond Skulls.  USA title Dark Obsession.  Gabriel Byrne as Lord Hugo Bruckton;  Amanda Donahoe as the commoner wife who is not addressed or referred to as "Lady."  Douglas Hodge played the commoner who lost his life for trying to report an accident.  In his review of this film, Roger Ebert passed along a comment from Michael Caine to the effect that the British aristos were " taken out of their homes at age five and spent the next ten years in a single-sex environment being beaten once a week."  The makers of this film were definitely not fans of the upper-crust types.

 

Open thread.

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