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Fatal (or Not!) Attraction


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Thanks, rosie, I'll try this one:

 

Subplot, actually, of an action story set in the 1860s. A woman's love is focused on a Confederate officer who is stationed near her home, and is available. He is war-wounded (lost an eye), but still fit for combat and for command. He does not return her obvious overtures of affection. 1960s. Color.

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The officer feels about the woman much the same as she feels about him. A soldier in wartime has to deal with the possibility of death, but he has a more fearful worry. -- Loss of his other eye, and the possibility of being a burden on her. She learns this when makes an offhand remark about "another grain of sand across my eyeball..." She despairs of having a future with him.

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The setting is a Confederate coastal city, under siege by Union troops. The woman decides to try to leave. Through an intermediary, she arranges to try to escape by sea, with the help of a blockade runner. She specifies that her personal servant will accompany her.

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The one-eyed Colonel is bearing down hard on the cattleman who brought the herd east to divert the cattle to safe Confederate ground. He starts by cutting off the man's finger, and promising to remove more if he does not get his way.

 

The cattleman is also the woman's contact with the blockade runner when she gives up on the Colonel and decides to get out of the besieged city.

 

 

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There is a scrap of history in support of this story. September 14-16, 1864: Confederate troops did in fact rustle a herd of cattle that was being taken to the Union troops ("the Beefstake Raid"). It prompted a comment by President Lincoln, something about the smoothest case of cow-stealing he had ever heard of.

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...all that and Janice Rule, too!

 

Sixes' thread.

 

BTW Sidebar: The historical "Beefsteak Raid" was commanded by Maj. Gen. Wade Hamption, CSA. In fiction, Gen Hampton was the commander of Charles Hamilton, the first Mr. Scarlett O'Hara. This is mentioned more in the novel than in the movie.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Sep 18, 2012 1:18 AM

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International romance. Danish woman, in love with a British art dealer, kills her daughter to keep the child from being a barrier to marrage. Consequences. Color. US-UK. 1980s. Could have fit into that "Horror Movie" thread. Drama novel that acquired horror features in this film adaptation.

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(6,881)

He traveled from London to Denmark on a quest for a valuable ceramic art piece. He needed a translator fluent in Danish and German to help with the deal. She was the one brought in for that purpose. Romance blossomed; when time came to return to England, she had no impediments. American actress in this role.

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In a beach scene on the English Channel, the husband sees a big wave coming ashore. There seems to be a female figure in it, seemingly body-surfing, face up. Black out on this sequence seemingly from fainting.

 

The wife dies by drowning. The movie's premise seems to be that the daughter came and got her. The husband is suspected of killing her. Charges. A trial.

 

The title of the film is the name of the ceramic art piece that was the occasion of their first meeting.

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Sep 27, 2012 12:10 AM

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The trial. The husband is questioned about his actions at the time of the wife's drowning. Seen only by the husband and the audience, the wife is also present. In pantomime, she instructs him in exactly what to say to firm up his alibi. He follows her suggestions, and it works. He is cleared.

 

Again, the actress in this role is American. Injuries kept her out the dancing career she really wanted. She has taken long sabbaticals to spend time with her family, but she still gets work when she wants to. She has done TV series work during this year. Her lookalike sister also works steadily.

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Maltin dismissed this film flatly as BOMB. Roger Ebert was intrigued by it, but also frustrated and irritated. He writes that he researched the wife character's name, to see if it had a history meaning 'devil' or something, "or perhaps another name for Eve." Nothing. From Ebert, 3 1/2 stars.

 

(I'd like to sic Svengoolie on it.)

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At more than 350 Views, retiring the question.

 

1988's *The Girl in a Swing*. That's the name of the art piece, and of the movie. Britisher Rupert Frazer and American Meg Tilly were the stars. Thumbs Up from Ebert, Thumbs Down from Maltin. It had its (creepy) moments, and it did focus on an obsessive love. As mentioned, I'd like to see what the Svengoolie crew might do with it.

 

Open thread.

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

Here's one from page 4 we neglected:

 

 

An early '50s film with a mysterious ending leaves us wondering whether "she" was the killer of her husband to inherit his fortune or he died of poor health. A young relative travels to investigate and finds himself falling in love with her. What film and who stars?

 

 

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