Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

It always gets me.


slaytonf
 Share

Recommended Posts

Iv'e seen A Star is Born I don't know how many times. All through the movie, I say to myself, "What is it, anyway? Just a line. I've seen it before. I can take it. It's no big deal." But every time Janet Gaynor says, "Hello, everybody. . . .This is Mrs. Norman Maine," I choke up. I can't help it. I don't know why don't get over it. I hope I never do.

 

What gets you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every time I see *Old Yeller!*

 

*When Travis (Tommy Kirk) has to shoot Old Yeller because he has hydrophobia the tears start to flow.*

I am starting to tear up even now.

 

Well thank you for bringing that memory back to me, it just made my day!

Who started this thread any ways?

 

Just kidding. Slaytonf you should get some good posts!

 

Thanks

 

Edited by: Lori3 on Apr 15, 2012 11:50 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On Borrowed Time used to get to me, but now Bobs Watson makes my teeth itch.

 

The ending to The Time Of Their Lives still gets to me, and the ending of The Ghost and Mrs. Muir gets to me even more.

 

I love fantasy movies with an optimistic view of the afterlife. If they have choral music, I'm a goner.

 

* good question

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, and even when Judy says, "This is Mrs Norman Maine" it chokes me up. I think it's the intense loyalty that does it.

 

In The Best Years Of Our Lives, when Wilma sees Harold take off his arms and get into bed and tucks him in and he realizes she loves him just the same as before, it never fails to choke me up.

 

And you KNOW these moments are coming!

 

Another movie that makes me cry is 2001, when Dave Bowman dies and is reborn as the "Star Child". The implication of what that scene means always tears me up.

 

There's countless other "moments" when films will make me cry-guess I'm empathetic (or a crybaby)

 

I had a bf that completely lost it, blubbering when Scarlett said, "As God is my witness, I'll never go hungry again." THAT amazed me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

City Lights with Charlie Chaplin. I just finished watching the film on TCM.

The last scene were the flower girl realizes that this "little tramp" is the one who gave her the money so she can see again.

 

When she touches his hand and then realizes it is him, the tears start flowing. I almost go into to sobs when camera ends with a close up of his face, smiling and holding the rose in his hand.

 

Boy, that is when "they" had the faces for close-ups, and the close-ups meant something.

 

I have seen this movie at least a dozen times, and every time I end up crying and loving every minute of it.

 

Just a masterpiece of a film.

 

Thanks

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Iv'e seen A Star is Born I don't know how many times. All through the movie, I say to myself, "What is it, anyway? Just a line. I've seen it before. I can take it. It's no big deal." But every time Janet Gaynor says, "Hello, everybody. . . .This is Mrs. Norman Maine," I choke up. I can't help it. I don't know why don't get over it. I hope I never do.

 

I react even more emotionally to the way Judy Garland says it in the 1954 version, but that's one of the great closing lines of any movie, and I'm not selling Janet Gaynor's version short.

 

The only closing shot that brings that sort of feeling in me doesn't even involve words. The 1979 Hungarian movie Angi Vera is about a young woman (the title character) who sells her soul to the Communists at a training camp and is rewarded with a limo ride through the countryside to Budapest, where a cushy desk job awaits her. Those who weren't so cooperative received no such rewards.

 

And in the final scene of the movie, while Angi Vera and her apparatchik patron are roaring through the countryside in their limo, they pass a hunched over woman who is laboriously pedaling her bicycle up a rutted hill, dressed in what can only be described as Salvation Army handout clothes.

 

All of a sudden, Angi Vera looks back at the woman, and instantly sees that it was her one time friend from the training camp who had defied the indoctrination speeches. A look of absolute horror envelops her face as she now realizes the enormity of her self-betrayal. Not a word is spoken, but that look on her face renders any words superfluous.

 

As for American films, one of my favorite closing scenes is in Bette Davis's Marked Woman , where the reporters are all gathering around the hero prosecutor (Humphrey Bogart), asking him about his future political career, while the group of women (including Davis) who risked their lives to throw the mob in jail walk away silently in the night's fog, out of work and with their futures hanging heavily over their heads. It's a perfectly played scene that gets me every time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}Y

>

> Another movie that makes me cry is 2001, when Dave Bowman dies and is reborn as the "Star Child". The implication of what that scene means always tears me up.

>

In the sci-fi world, two movies that almost always (at least the first several times I saw them) bring tears to my eyes are SILENT RUNNING (starting with the beautiful opening credits, and later with a couple of Bruce Dern's more emotional moments), and CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND (when Francois Truffaut exchanges sign language with the extra-terrestrial....never fails to brings tears to my eyes).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't cry easily at movies, and sometimes when I do it's not the kind of film you'd think it'd be.The most recent film that made me cry was *Hugo*. I know some might be surprised at that, but it's actually a very sweet movie. And it has noble and inspiring things to say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though I don't watch many modern movies, there was a scene in "Hereafter" (2010) that had me in tears and shaken up even into the next day. George Lonegan (Matt Damon), who can channel spirits, speaks to Marcus (Frankie McLaren), a young teenager who has lost his brother in a violent death. As the dead brother, George consoles Marcus and tells him that his life has to go on. Marcus, who is unable to cope with the death, is shattered and weeps like a baby. I can hardly write more - already I feel myself getting emotional again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

kriegerg69 wrote (with appropriate deletions):

 

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND ...... (above-referenced deletions) never fails to brings tears to my eyes.

 

And to mine also, after trying (and failing) to watch TCM's horrendous copy that it keeps on showing, over and over and over and over again. Never once mentioned by TCM is the challenge associated with attempting to see what lies behind those blurry outlines of something or other or whatever.

 

This is indeed an encounter of a very special kind. I don't what the number is. What I do know is that I do not want to get anywhere close to it again.

 

musikone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I teared up at the ending of War Horse.. another great story that's current.

 

Thanks for mentioning Hugo. I am about to watch it tonight. Many of my teary moments are already listed, but another some others catch me every time.

 

Field of Dreams - the ending

 

The Natural - Hobbs homerun

 

Why is it the sports movies?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every time I've watched The Bicycle Thief I try to emotionally brace myself for the ending, yet it gets to me every time.

 

After the frustrations of failing to get his own bike back, the father impulsively tries to steal another one and gets caught. It's bad enough that he is publicly humiliated as a thief by a crowd of angry men who berate him and slap him across the face. What adds to the power of the scene tenfold, however, is the father's knowledge that this public debasement is taking place in front of his wide-eyed son.

 

After the men have released him and allow him to leave, the father walks away in a state of shock, with his little boy walking silently beside him. Then comes the moment that tears me apart, when the father starts to sob, as the two of them disappear into a crowd. The End. A small little personal tragedy, one of millions that is a part of what we call the human condition. It is a moment so real, so searingly honest in its depiction of human frailty. I regard it as one of the most profoundly sad endings that the screen had ever given us.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The scene that always gets me is near the end of "Of Mice and Men" when George euthanizes Lennie after he begins the see the farm. I know the story by heart. I know what's going to happen. I weep like a child every time. I refer, of course, to the Chaney/Meredith/Roach version from 1939-40.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ending of "The Champ" (1931) in the dressing room after Wallace Beery checks out and a sobbing Jackie Cooper calls out to his mother and goes into her arms always gets me. There are several places in Johnny Belinda that come almost as close. Also the end of "Ice Castles" (1978) but the musical score with Melissa Manchester has a lot to do with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andy--I just love the way Judy looks at the heart carving Norman made for her the night they first met backstage at the theatre. That's a great actress!

 

AFAIC Judy Garland in A Star Is Born gave one of the best dramatic performances I've ever seen in any movie, in the way she conveys in both actions and words her unconditional love for a man whom everyone else has written off as a drunken has-been. I can't even THINK of that "Mrs. Norman Maine" line without getting a lump in my throat.

 

The funny thing is that other than "The Man That Got Away," I've never been that taken with the musical numbers---give me "Shanghai Lil", "42nd Street", "Remember My Forgotten Man", "I'll Take Manhattan", or any one of a dozen songs in My Fair Lady any day---but the storyline and the acting, not just Garland but virtually the entire cast, still makes me think of that 1954 movie as the best "musical" I've ever seen.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every time I've watched The Bicycle Thief I try to emotionally brace myself for the ending, yet it gets to me every time.

 

I'd earlier mentioned the endings to Angi Vera and Marked Woman, but if I'd wanted to keep going down the list of unforgettable endings without regard to the country of origin, The Bicycle Thief would have been second. If you've ever seen the segment of Rossellini's Paisan where the soldier tracks down the boy who's stolen his shoes and discovers the conditions in which the boy is living, even that poignant ending pales in comparison to the final scene of The Bicycle Thief . I am SO glad that TCM seems to show that movie on a fairly regular basis. Easily one of the top ten movies on any all-time list.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...