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Born in the wrong time (?)


misswonderly3
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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote}

> h3. **** !

> I'm sorry, but when I read it, I thought it must have been an story placed by The Onion.. but it's for real.

>

>

> Absolutely incredible! LOL.. What that has to do with Christmas, I don't know!

>

 

Perhaps this related Catalonian Christmas tradition will also give you a laugh:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caganer

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Haha, I once hung a Christmas tree from the ceiling when I was a display designer for an art supply store. We simply didn't want anything stolen off it!

 

misswonderly, I lurved that article (god I miss the Globe & Mail, Canadians still know how to write sentences)

 

especially this line:

 

>5. Heritage preservation is more labour-intensive, which means more jobs. It?s also good for the environment.

 

My job.

When I'm in an oddball mood at some gathering (esp among the artsyfartsy crowd) and anyone asks what "I do" I'll reply "a professional recycler."

 

I also find restoration tastes to be cyclical. For example there are decades when something like neon signs are considered garish and trashy and others when they are considered "art". These tastes often ebb & flow with economics, war & optimism.

Remember the 70's when everything was "natural" and rough hewn wood was desirable siding? Cars were orange, gold & brown?

10-20 years later the opposite happens when sleek lines, shiney modern colors are "clear" turquoises and purples.

 

THIS to me is the biggest reason to preserve & restore. You never know when that building you want to raize will come back into vogue and there's no true examples left.

 

I've seen this happen before. People don't have the insight to restore a vintage diner so they create a cartoon of what they think a diner should look like, like that Ford's Garage example shown above.

 

Developers often look at me like I have a hole in my head when I tell them their original 1949 colors were canary cream and terra cotta red, they just SO much want to paint it turquoise & pink because it's all they know. And if those attitudes continue, the real thing, real colors will be gone & forgotten forever.

 

And like that author said, something happens when you walk inside a well preserved building. Who doesn't enjoy the experience of seeing a film in a beautifully restored vintage theater? Multiplexes are like seeing a movie in an airport, no thought whatsoever to the PEOPLE inhabiting the building. And sadly, fewer & fewer people will have that "real" experience to know the difference.

Gone forever.

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>Tiki Soo wrote: I've seen this happen before. People don't have the insight to restore a vintage diner so they create a cartoon of what they think a diner should look like, like that Ford's Garage example shown above.

I am not arguing with you, but unfortunately, business owners may not see the value in research for restoring. It is why I called it nostalgic. Nostalgic is the fantasy memory of the experience, or what we feel is the experience. We soften the edges, we rationalize out the reality that we find less than ideal. We add details that we think are true to the design.

 

TikiSoo, I am with you on preservation, but most people look at our older buildings immediately as eyesores. I am not against new design, but for every Fenway Park that's venerated, there are Metropolitan Stadiums torn down to be replaced by shopping centers, so they build the Humphrey Metrodome, which is now replace by Target Field.. Minneapolis/St Paul has had 4 baseball fields (and two teams) to Boston's One.

 

But now I am a bit off track.

 

post.gif

 

h4. Shangri-La is for sale

I don't know it's heritage but it is a lovely setting, if there is no hurricane.

 

h5. BTW- The Great Smokey Mountains NP are our treasure.. May it always be thus. I want to visit this beautiful area one day.

 

Edited by: casablancalover on May 14, 2012 9:48 PM

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>casablancalover said: Nostalgia is the fantasy memory of the experience, or what we feel is the experience. We rationalize out the reality that we find less than ideal and add details that we think are true to the design.

 

Wow, so perfectly stated I copied that & am keeping it in my restoration notebook. I may even use it in my sales pitches!

 

My reasoning;"This lasted 80/90/100 years because it was done right the first time. The only reason it needs work now is because some **** didn't properly maintain it. Don't be another ****-be a hero to your community"

 

I should know, 80% of my day is spent undoing bad previous repairs.

 

And I'll reiterate the reason we prefer vintage buildings, houses, neighborhoods, shopping, theater experiences is because the designers took PEOPLE under consideration, not what will be cheapest & easiest for the developer.

 

We live in a society that accepts short life spans of things rather than value longevity. I think that changes for many by time they become a senior citizen. We need to instill those values in our kids.

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Perhaps the Kinks say it best. If anyone in pop culture cared about old buildings and old ways, it was them. Just take a listen to one of their signature songs, The Village Green Preservation Society. It's a great little tune, and I picked a youtube vid that includes the lyrics, since they are so pertinent to the discussion here.

 

 

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OK, I'll jump onto the music portion of our program.

Despite the fact it has no melody, this Pretender's song is even more pertinent:

 

I WENT BACK TO OHIO

BUT MY CITY WAS GONE

THERE WAS NO TRAIN STATION

THERE WAS NO DOWNTOWN

SOUTH HOWARD HAD DISAPPEARED

ALL MY FAVORITE PLACES

MY CITY HAD BEEN PULLED DOWN

REDUCED TO PARKING SPACES

A, O, WAY TO GO OHIO

 

WELL I WENT BACK TO OHIO

BUT MY FAMILY WAS GONE

I STOOD ON THE BACK PORCH

THERE WAS NOBODY HOME

I WAS STUNNED AND AMAZED

MY CHILDHOOD MEMORIES

SLOWLY SWIRLED PAST

LIKE THE WIND THROUGH THE TREES

A, O, OH WAY TO GO OHIO

 

I WENT BACK TO OHIO

BUT MY PRETTY COUNTRYSIDE

HAD BEEN PAVED DOWN THE MIDDLE

BY A GOVERNMENT THAT HAD NO PRIDE

THE FARMS OF OHIO

HAD BEEN REPLACED BY SHOPPING MALLS

AND MUZAK FILLED THE AIR

FROM SENECA TO CUYAHOGA FALLS

SAID, A, O, OH WAY TO GO OHIO

 

And the saddest part is, she could be talking about any of the northeast rustbelt states.

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TikiSoo, oddly enough, since I am a Pretenders fan, I was unfamiliar with that song until someone posted it in one of the music threads ( quite a while ago.) The music is good, but the words are heart-breaking, so true- the singer is so bewildered and sad that her beloved town has been so altered. Thank you for posting the lyrics.

 

Jake, shouldn't that streetcar in New Orleans have a different name ? ( we all know what.)

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Very Good Pics of the Traditions in stone, Jake. Beautiful pics.

 

In upholding traditions, it's hard not to notice the Masons and their Temples.

 

h4. In Mobile, AL is a wonderful Egyptian Revival simply called the Downtown Temple.

post.gif

 

Unfortunately, it has been converted to a banqueting venue.. The loss of the possible interiors for their rites would be even more tragic than the building it housed. It is the traditions in those rites that are of incredible value.

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Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim, Synagogue, 1840, Charleston, SC

 

What a breathtaking view of the inside. I'm stunned but delighted that this synagogue still exists considering the hatred of the **** for the Jews and the power they held in the South and Mid-West for so long. It's a real testament to the endurance of a brave and faithful people.

 

In the late 70's when I was going through a tough time I would slip over to a small temple accross from where I was taking some classes and just sit in a small chapel-like room with an open Torah at the front and pray. I felt comfortable there but always worried I'd be asked to leave for being Gentile. I later learned I wouldn't have been; that's why it was open.

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