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EugeniaH

"To Live in the 1920s"

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This is probably old news to visitors of nitrateville.com, but I was reading a post that linked to a YouTube clip of "life in the 1920s". For classic movie fans, there is also color footage of the Hollywood premiere of *Dirigible* (around the 4:30 mark). Enjoy!

 

 

 

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I love the color shots of the city scenes, at around the 4:06 mark. The picture is so clear it almost looks like a 1960s recreation of 1920s life, not actual '20s footage.

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Hi ginnyfan,

 

Keep in mind you are looking at an early "two-strip" Technicolor process that predates VHS technology by almost 50 years! As such, it is delightful glimpse of what the world looked like back then, and conveys that impression in a way no pure black and white film could.

 

I would give the people of the 1920's high grades for technical innovation! Television, the Technicolor process, sound film and the development of radio into a commercial mass medium happened in the 20's. What they accomplished, has to be judged within the context of that time.

 

A very delightful submission Eugenia!

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One of our greatest Presidents: *Calvin Coolidge.*

 

Jake in the Heartland

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It's neat to see early color scenes of Los Angeles or Hollywood.

The two color Technicolor footage of the premier of DIRIGABLE would have been shot in 1931.

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Here is another clip I found - color footage of 1928 Hollywood actresses (I hope this wasn't posted already, but my apologies for the repeat, if so):

 

 

 

Glorious YouTube - history on demand! :)

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I would love to see such color footage (like the city scenes) on a movie screen. I'd sit near the front row and try to get absorbed in it as much as I could - the closest I could ever come to getting into a time machine and actually going back there, a'la The Twilight Zone.

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Thanks for sharing the links to the color film. I like the two color Technicolor process. When you get to see well preserved footage like THE VIKING (1928), REDSKIN (1929), FOLLOW THRU (1930), or WHOOPEE (1930) it looks really nice.

Like the "Stetson Hat" number from WHOOPEE!:

Betty Grable is the last Goldwyn Girl in the line at the 4:25 mark.

 

 

 

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Thanks for your link, Scottman. As the friendly poster mark b. would say, I'm digging it. :)

 

So of course this begs the question, why weren't more early movies made in color, since they had the capability to do it? I'm assuming expense is the main reason...

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I believe that it was a combination of the high cost of the Technicolor process and the cost of the new sound technology. I'm sure the studios would only gamble using color and sound on a proven hit (like FOLLOW THRU, a huge Broadway hit, or WHOOPEE!, also a big hit on Broadway) which is why the vast majority of two color Technicolor films made in the early 30s were of Broadway successes.

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Thanks so much, Scottman & Eugenia, for sharing those links of those

Awesome 'Colorful' video clips . . .

 

 

Scottman, that was interesting to know that that was Betty Grable dancing along with those other 'CowGals' . . . Little did she or others know that she would soon be the most Popular 'Pin-Up' Girl in the next decade.

 

 

And @ 2:35, I noticed how the camera traveled in between the dancers' legs. That seemed to be a very popular 'shot' for the camera in a lot of dance numbers of the 1930's. I guess it was a chance and a 'daring' move, to see more of the ladies' legs.

 

 

And Eugenia, those clips you've posted were just magnificent and Beautiful. The first one you posted, with the famous actresses, such as Laura La Plante and Corliss Palmer . . . I just Loved the outfit that was modeled by Raquel Torres. That Cap with the intricate appliques attached and a matching handbag to match was just devine. It really accentuated her 'cuteness'.

 

 

And your clip of the 1930 'Glamour Daze' . . . @ 1:43 I could almost swear that that was a very young Angela Langsbury. She looks absolutely like her except that I 'Googled' Angela Langsbury and saw that she was born in 1925.

 

 

But I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed watching these clips and have also wondered how it would be like to have lived in that era, as well. Afterall, just watching the first clip, it was good to see people ACTUALLY talking to one another, instead of pulling 'cell phones' out of nowhere, 'slapping' them to their faces and start conversing . . .

 

 

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The original nitrate masters must have beem kept in a perfect climate controlled vault. The cameraman and director of photography were gifted at what they do. I wonder was this clip digitally restored?

 

The movie "The Ragman" (1925) also was razor sharp. There were street scenes, all though in B&W, looks like you can step out onto the sidewalk.

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