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Shoulda Got The Oscar but Not Even Nominated


TomJH

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Here's a chance for TCM fans to vent. Name the actor or actress who you think should have received an Academy Award for a performance that wasn't even nominated for the award. (If you're not quite up on your Oscar history and select a performance that was nominated, don't worry, someone will come along to correct you). This can apply to supporting performances, as well.

 

I'll start the ball rolling: *James Cagney in White Heat*. Cagney's first gangster portrayal in ten years, and a big comeback for him at Warner Brothers, after a few years in which he had failed to make a go of it as an independent filmmaker. Cagney had played a few quieter types, reflective of his own personality to a large degree but the public had greeted those portrayals with a yawning indifference.

 

For 1949's White Heat Cagney returned to his old form but with a ferocious force never seen in him before, as he played the biggest pyscho nut case gangster the screen had seen until then. And he did it brilliantly, with his cafeteria breakdown scene and his "Made it, Ma. Top of the world!" finale the stuff of movie legend.

 

Incredibly, Cagney wasn't even nominated for an Oscar for a performance that seers into the memory of anyone who has seen the film. A total injustice, but far from the only one in Oscar history.

 

So who gets your pick as the actor or actress whose performance most haunts you that failed to get an Oscar nomination? Here, at least, you can do your own small part to correct that injustice.

 

Edited by: TomJH on Jun 14, 2012 9:58 PM

 

Edited by: TomJH on Jun 15, 2012 6:59 AM

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> {quote:title=TomJH wrote:}{quote}Here's a chance for TCM fans to vent. Name the actor or actress who you think should have received an Academy Award for a performance that wasn't even nominated for the award. (If you're not quite up on your Oscar history and select a performance that was nominated, don't worry, someone will come along to correct you). This can apply to supporting performances, as well.

>

> I'll start the ball rolling: *James Cagney in White Heat*. Cagney's first gangster portrayal in ten years, and a big comeback for him at Warner Brothers, after a few years in which he had failed to make a go of it as an independent filmmaker. Cagney had played a few quieter types, reflective of his own personality to a large degree but the public had greeted those portrayals with a yawning indifference.

>

> For 1949's White Heat Cagney returned to his old form but with a ferocious force never seen in him before, as he played the biggest pyscho nut case gangster the screen had seen until then. And he did it brilliantly, with his cafeteria breakdown scene and his "Made it, Ma. Top of the world!" finale the stuff of movie legend.

>

> Incredibly, Cagney wasn't even nominated for an Oscar for a performance that seers into the memory of anyone who has seen the film. A total injustice, but far from the only won in Oscar history.

>

> So who gets your pick as the actor or actress whose performance most haunts you that failed to get an Oscar nomination? Here, at least, you can do your own small part to correct that injustice.

I would have to say LON CHANEY SR. Not for any one performance, but he should have been awarded an Oscar posthumously for his dedication to his craft and his whole body of work. It is an injustice that he has been ignored for too long. Hopefully someday that injustice will be addressed.

 

Another actor from the "horror" genre that should receive a posthumous award is BORIS KARLOFF. Aside from his iconic portrayal of the FRANKENSTEIN MONSTER in three films which, in and of itself, is more then enough reason for an award, it is Karloff and his monster who were really responsible for the birth of the horror/sci fi/fantasy genre. If not for Karloff and the monster there would have been no KING KONG, no ALIEN, no STAR WARS, no LORD OF THE RINGS, and no HARRY POTTER films. I firmly believe this.

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*Gloria Swanson for her performance as Norma Desmond in SUNSET BOULEVARD.*

 

GILLIS' VOICE:

"So they were grinding after all, those cam-

eras. Life, which can be strangely merciful,

had taken pity on Norma Desmond. The

dream she had clung to so desperately had

enfolded her..."

 

---

(At the foot of the stairs Norma stops and says...)

 

NORMA:

"I can't go on with the scene. I'm too happy.

Do you mind, Mr. DeMille, if I say a few words?

 

Thank you. I just want to tell you how happy I

am to be back in the studio making a picture again.

You don't know how much I've missed all of you.

And I promise you I'll never desert you again,

because after "Salome" we'll make another

picture, and another and another.

 

You see, this is my life. It always will be. There's

nothing else - just us and the cameras and those

wonderful people out there in the dark...

 

All right, Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my closeup."

 

BRING UP MUSIC.

 

FADE OUT.

 

THE END

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*I would have to say LON CHANEY SR. Not for any one performance, but he should have been awarded an Oscar posthumously for his dedication to his craft and his whole body of work. It is an injustice that he has been ignored for too long. Hopefully someday that injustice will be addressed.*

 

Well, it would be a first if the Motion Picture Academy did do that since I don't believe it's ever been done before, and certainly not for someone who has been gone for over 80 years.

 

Chaney was a unique performer*.* If I could give him an Oscar for any one performance it would probably be for The Unknown, which was released in 1927, the first year for which the Oscars were awarded (actually it was for the period 1927/28). The scene that always stays with me is that in which Chaney, having had his arms surgically removed because he believes that Joan Crawford can't stand the touch of a man's hands, then has her stand before him, with her new lover with his arms wrapped around her. Chaney's acting is a remarkable demonstration of an actor showing his emotions slowly bubbling to the surface and bursting into hysteria, as he realizes the cruel joke that fate has played upon him.

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*Gloria Swanson for her performance as Norma Desmond in SUNSET BOULEVARD.*

 

Fred, this thread is about great performances that were NOT Oscar nominated. Swanson's great comeback performance did get nominated. Still, a lot would probably agree with your pick for 1950, nominated or not (though my own for that same year would probably have gone to Bette Davis for All About Eve, two truly great performances in the same year by actresses considered to be past their prime rising to the occasion with wonderfully written roles).

 

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Well, since that famous year with the two over-the-top (but utterly enjoyable) performances came up, let me chime in and say the winner in 1950 should have been the brilliant performance by *Eleanor Parker* in Caged. (The winner, Judy Holliday, is my second choice).

 

But to the point of this thread, two actresses gave really super performances in 1932, and were not nominated: *Marlene Dietrich* in Blonde Venus; and *Kay Francis* in One Way Passage. The Dietrich film is perhaps the most underrated of her Von Sternberg efforts, and she gives an extremely subtle and many-layered performance, including the song in the apesuit!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79sCmbDtx_k

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Hi TomJH. This is a fun subject for a thread. Before I make my "real" post I have a question.

 

Can we list the same actor in three different roles (films) that we think they should have received an nomination for an Oscar? (I can't choose between the three roles.)

 

I am sure you can guess who I am referring too. I can of course think of other actors and actresses who should have be nominated for an Oscar. However, I will stick to my favorite, since I have assigned myself as the person who keeps his name alive on these boards. ;)

 

OK?

 

Thanks

Lori3

 

Edited by: Lori3 on Jun 14, 2012 9:12 PM

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*Can we list the same actor in three different roles (films) that we think they should have received an nomination for an Oscar?*

 

Sure, Lori. have fun. There aren't too many rules here outside of a performance that should have won but wasn't nominated.

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This doesn't seem too difficult. Cary Grant was only nominated twice (for Penny Serenade and None but the Lonely Heart ) so we can chose at least a dozen performances between The Awful Truth and Charade.

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1940 -- Henry Fonda for *The Grapes of Wrath* instead of James Stewart in *The Philadelphia Story*. It's one of Stewart's weakest performances, IMO. His performance isn't even as good as Cary Grant's, who wasn't even nominated. I suspect (others do too) that Stewart only won because the Academy members felt they had passed him over the year before for one of his best roles -- *Mr. Smith Goes to Washington*.

 

1941 -- Barbara Stanwyck for *Ball of Fire* or *The Lady Eve* instead of Joan Fontaine (Zzzzzz) in *Suspicion*.

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}1940 -- Henry Fonda for {font}*The Grapes of Wrath*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} instead of James Stewart in {font}*The Philadelphia Story*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}. It's one of Stewart's weakest performances, IMO. His performance isn't even as good as Cary Grant's, who wasn't even nominated. I suspect (others do too) that Stewart only won because the Academy members felt they had passed him over the year before for one of his{font}[best|http://forums.tcm.com/post!reply.jspa?messageID=8649459#|Powered by Text-Enhance]{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} roles -- {font}*Mr. Smith Goes to Washington*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}. {font}

 

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}1941 -- Barbara Stanwyck for {font}*Ball of Fire*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} or {font}*The Lady Eve*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} instead of Joan Fontaine (Zzzzzz) in {font}*Suspicion*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}.{font}

 

Okay, I'll say it this time and give the originator a break. This thread is about *performers whom you feel should have won an Oscar for a performance they were not nominated for.* Henry Fonda did receive.d a Best Actor nomination for Grapes of Wrath, and Barbara Stanwyck was nominated for Best Actress for Ball of Fire.

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Two: Steve McQueen

 

Papillon: was not even nominated.

 

The Sand Pebbles: there's no doubt McQueen could act and the people loved him.

 

Jake Holman in the Heartland

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postmanalwaysrings29.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

*John Garfield: The Postman Always Rings Twice 1946*. His performance is so subtle, yet powerful it is amazing. You believe his lust, confusion, frustration and fear, and you believe he loves Lana. He does all this without being “big” in any way. From the moment Lana drops her lipstick and then the camera focuses on him till he finally gets a full look at lovely Lana and you actually see him “take in a breath” because of her beauty, and it is remarkable. I think most men would have he same reaction if the saw Lana standing there in her white mini shorts. Garfield again gives a natural feeling to his role, and very believable. He should have been nominated at least.

 

 

*John Garfield: The Breaking Point 1950.* Re-telling of a Hemingway story that WB first did as “To Have and Have Not.” This version from my understanding was much more true to Hemingway’s story. Hemmingway said out of all his stories that would become films, this was his favorite! Garfield again gives a subtle and powerful performance of a man caught at the breaking point due to financial issues bearing down on him from all sides. He should have been nominated at least.

 

 

*John Garfield: He Ran All The Way 1951.* Garfield at his best and it is a beautiful performance he left us with in this his last film. Garfield shows his tough side and his tender and vulnerable side as a small time hoodlum who takes Shelly Winters and her family hostage. As with his very first role as Mickey Borden in Four Daughters he again is that “eternal outsider” always looking in. He wants to belong to this family but he does not know how to do it. During the film your sympathies and concerns switch from the family to him. Garfield allows the audience to see this man’s longing to belong, and the difficulties he has in understanding the love this family displays to each other. It is a beautiful multi-layered performance and a beautiful swan song for a great actor. Not only do I believe he should have been nominated but I believe he should have won the Oscar.

 

 

Of course we know why no nomination came along for him. HUAC had Hollywood and the Academy members running like frighten little rats, and there was no way they would nominate a “blacklisted actor.” Garfield does look weary and stressed in the film but this look fits with the character, and it is understandable due to the real stress he was facing from the government. However he still looks handsome.

 

 

I could probably think of another 25 more actors and actresses who should have at least received a nomination for one of their performances. However, most of you will probably list these iconic stars and that is fine. I will "stick" with my favorite and keep his name alive on these message boards.

 

 

Thanks

 

 

Lori3

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Well, I think the reason given for Garfield's not winning an Oscar for those roles is simply nonsense. The films mentioned below simply were not considered "major" films and not the sort of thing the Academy was honoring in those days.

 

That's the answer. Pure and simple. There was no "conspiracy."

 

Also, I'm guessing plenty of people thought he wasn't that great of an actor and that's another reason. And with all due respect to Mr. Garfield, when people think of POSTMAN it's not him they're thinking of, it's Lana Turner.

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This is one of those categories that has endless possibilities. But let's just take a look at Best Actor 1965.

 

These were the nominees:

 

Laurence Olivier, Othello

Rod Steiger, The Pawnbroker

Oskar Werner, Ship of Fools

Richard Burton, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

Lee Marvin, Cat Ballou

 

4 of those of monumentally great performances that define the actor giving them. And which of those 4 won? None, it went to Lee Marvin for an over-the-top performance in a forgettable film. Go figure.

 

 

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Well, I DON'T think *Cat Ballou* was forgettable, but I DO think Marvin should have shared that Oscar with that HORSE!

 

 

As for Shoulda got but not nominated: BOBBY DARIN in *Pressure Point*

 

 

MICKEY ROONEY and/or JACKIE GLEASON in *Requiem For A Heavywheight* .

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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*Filmgoddess wrote: I think the reason given for Garfield's not winning an Oscar for those roles is simply nonsense. The films mentioned below simply were not considered "major" films and not the sort of thing the Academy was honoring in those days.*

 

*I'm guessing plenty of people thought he wasn't that great of an actor and that's another reason.*

 

Filmgoddess, I think that you and Lori are BOTH correct. Lori's correct because by the final months of 1950 John Garfield had become a political untouchable, as far as the studios were concerned. That's the reason Warner Bros. gave Breaking Point a limited release. There was no way that any studio would invest funds in Oscar promoting an actor that was suspected of Communism at the time.

 

At the same time, though, I think you arre probably right, as well. Even if there had been no HUAC to persecute Garfield at the time, both Breaking Point and He Ran All the Way were the kind of "little" films that received scant attention from Academy voters anyway.

 

In addition, I think that Garfield gives the kind of subtle, beautifully nuanced performance in The Breaking Point that a lot of viewers take for granted, and wouldn't have even considered to be "acting" (certainly nothing like a BIG performance, from someone like, say, Laurence Olivier as Hamlet - now that's acting, they would have been saying, maybe even out in the sticks, even though few could connect with him like they could with Garfield).

 

That's another reason why Garfield might not have been considered "Oscar worthy" for Breaking Point. (Jose Ferrer got the Academy Award that year for a huge, theatrical flamboyant turn as Cyrano de Bergerac, quite a contrast). Having said that, I agree with Lori, though, that Garfield's wonderful work in Breaking Point was worthy of a nomination.

 

As for your final statement that Garfield might not have been considered to be a great actor during his own lifetime, I don't know if that is the case or not. But, even if true, so what? Were people like Loretta Young or Ray Milland considered "great" when they were not only nominated but won?

 

Finally, let's not forget that by 1950 Garfield already enjoyed the status of having been Oscar nominated twice, for Four Daughters and Body and Soul. Once an actor or actress has a nomination under their belt I think critics and fans start looking at them a little differently.

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I can come up with plenty of people who SHOULD have been nominated, but I cant go so far to say they SHOULD have won. You will discount a lot of possible responses with that qualifier. Just this year, I think Tilda Swinton SHOULD have been nominated for We Need to Talk About Kevin, should she have won over Meryl Streep? I dont know........Few people saw the film. That's how it goes with Oscar nominations..........

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I agree, I loved Lee Marvin in that film -- even though I usually can't stand drunk performances -- and Cat Ballou is certainly not forgettable. However, I was pulling for Oskar Werner that year, who gave a stunning performance in Ship of Fools.

 

But in terms of this thread, I think *Rod Steiger* should have won for his performance as the Hasidic Rabbi in the 1981 film *The Chosen*. It was a towering performance, and an uncharacteristically subtle one for Steiger. He wasn't even nominated. 1981 was a stupid year for Oscars, the best film award going to the insipid, sloppily directed Chariots of Fire instead of the brilliant Reds, due to political squeamishness.

 

 

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Filmgoddness you wrote:

 

*Well, I think the reason given for Garfield's not winning an Oscar for those roles is simply nonsense. The films mentioned below simply were not considered "major" films and not the sort of thing the Academy was honoring in those days.*

 

*That's the answer. Pure and simple. There was no "conspiracy."*

 

*Also, I'm guessing plenty of people thought he wasn't that great of an actor and that's another reason. And with all due respect to Mr. Garfield, when people think of POSTMAN it's not him they're thinking of, it's Lana Turner.*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You obviously haven’t seen Joanne Woodward’s TCM Word of Mouth where she talks about The Postman Always Rings Twice. Joanne Woodward says, Garfield gives a remarkable understated performance, and it is his film. Maybe you have seen the promo and you disagree with an Academy award winning actress.

 

 

Maybe you haven’t seen The John Garfield Story, in which many talented actors talk about the great talent John Garfield had as an actor.

 

 

TCM is doing a tribute to John Garfield on September 19^th^, and The John Garfield Story will be shown that day. Why don’t you watch and maybe learn something about John Garfield’s talent. Also, you might learn for people who were around during the HUAC mess, and hear them give testimony how Hollywood shunned Garfield and how doors where closed in his face from his Hollywood friends. HUAC had everyone during that time running scared, and many people had their careers destroyed by HUAC. John Garfield was the most prominent actor of the time to have film star status taken away from him. Of course HUAC cleared his name of any Communist activity about a month after his death.

 

 

Many of Garfield’s co-stars considered him a great actor.

 

 

Edward G. Robinson, {color:black}“John Garfield was one of the best young actors.”

 

 

{color:black}Gregory Peck, “John Garfield was one of the greatest actors I every worked with”.

 

 

{color:black}I could go on but I don’t have the time.

 

 

{color:black}You write in one sentence how you guess many people didn’t think that Garfield was a great actor and then in the next sentence you write with all due respect to Mr. Garfield. Sorry to me with your first sentence you just disrespected him.

 

 

{color:black}I thought this thread was set up for us to list actors who we believed should have been nominated for an Oscar, period. It is our opinion that is all.

 

 

{color:black}I guess we are all entitled to our own opinion but I don’t understand why some people feel they need to voice their opinion in such a mean and hurtful way. I am obviously a huge fan of Mr.Garfied, and currently have a petition going to get WB/TCM to finally put together a box-set of his films for purchase. I and others are working hard to promote this petition and make it a success.

 

 

{color:black}I and many, many others feel that John Garfield was one of the greatest actors that this country has ever produced. He is also one of the most forgotten, perhaps due to the blacklisting. However, just because he does not have that star recognition that other iconic stars have does not mean he is any less talented. John Garfield should take a back set to no one.

 

 

{color:black}Tom, thank you for your post.

 

 

{color:black}Lori3

 

 

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The first time I saw The Pawnbroker was about 2 years ago on one of the Encore stations. I came into the film at the halfway point. Rod Steiger's performance was so riveting in that second half that I immediately purchased the DVD because I had to see the film in it's entirety. Every time I watch this film I am reduced to tears; this performance is even better than his performance in In the Heat of the Night. Coupled with Quincy Jones' great musical score, this is the film that made Sidney Lumet my favorite director. I am going to make it my duty to see Cat Ballou (it never piqued my interest) just for the sake of comparison.......

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*Robert Mitchum in Night of the Hunter. Eleanor Parker in Caged. Andy Griffith in A Face in the Crowd. Others that come to mind are already listed...*

Just in case you didn't know it, Eugenia, Eleanor Parker was nominated for Caged. Mitchum in Night of the Hunter is an excellent example of the kind of performance that should have been honoured but didn't even rate Oscar consideration. As a small, "arty" film that disappeared at the box office, Night of the Hunter didn't rate any kind of consideration from the Motion Picture Academy in the spring of 1956.

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