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Movies with Amusement Park Scenes, Especially Carousels


misswonderly3
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>after misswonderly:

>Interesting how so many movies and tv shows used carousels and their horses to denote dark magic and malevolence.

 

I think it is because of the nature of carousels and carnivals themselves. Not only are they places of amusement and entertainment--rather a good part of the amusement and entertainment they provide is due to the more or less overt element of danger they represent. The thrill derived from wheeling around comes from the subtle threat to one's safety. The magic of such things delights, but can also endanger.

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Well, I was thinking that the danger operated on an unconscious, or at least semi-unconscious level. Carnivals are out-of-the-ordinary, therefore unfamiliar. What people are ignorant of, they fear, thus the thrill. Carnivals are places where luck and magic work. For a small fee, you can take a chance, and win something for free (never mind what you win is probably worth less that what it costs to win it). They are places where the attendees, or suckers, are rooked and cheated out of thier money in rigged games, likely with some aware of the fact. They are places out-of-bounds, where people can escape the conventional restrictions on them, affording them opportunity and risk. The contrast between the lure of the possible, and the fear of misfortune provides added zest to the attractions.

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>Note: I think that a Carousel Ride should go in One Direction . . . Counter Clock Wise. I noticed that some Carousels go in the opposite direction. I've yet to ride on a Carousel going Clock Wise. I'd feel like I was going backwards.

 

ugaarte: British carousels go clockwise because the riders can mount from the "proper" side of the horse. American (& some European) carousels go counter clockwise because most people are right handed and it was easier to "catch the brass ring" with your right hand on the outside of the ride.

I've been "in the biz" for 30 years and never ridden an English carousel. (there are a few in the US)

 

Last trip to Toronto I was disappointed to find Center Island's gorgeous Dentzel carousel has new figures replacing some of the valuable originals. Gone is my favorite horse with canaries holding drapery and the very rare bears.

 

And I am WAY more creeped out by porcelain dolls than wax figures, mannequins or amusement parks.

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TikiSoo ~

{ . . . British carousels go clockwise because the riders can mount from the "proper" side of the horse . . . }

 

 

 

Mystery Solved ! . . . And I'll wonder no more ! Thats right ! ... a horse is mounted on it's left side ! That brought me to the Rememberance of Mary Poppins in the Chalk Drawing, where they rode the Carousel that was going 'Clock Wise'. I found that scene on Youtube but the quality was quite bad.

 

 

And I've always heard about trying to 'catch the BRASS Ring' . . . but have seen it Only in Cartoons, such as in the (1936) 'SomeWhere in Dreamland' . . . beginning @ 6:05.

 

 

 

 

 

{ . . . Gone is my favorite horse with canaries holding drapery and the very rare bears. . . .}

 

 

 

I can so sympathize with your 'loss' . . . I, too, have many 'Sentimental Memories' of things 'gone by'. But at least we have the Sweet Memory of being able to say that we 'Actually Saw It' or 'Actually Had in Our Hands'... for a little while .... as opposed to Only hearing about it, years later.

 

 

 

Come to think of it, I'll have to visit our Chicago Lincoln Park Zoo soon.

Though they don't have the Lovely Carousil horses that I so love, they do have, instead, the 'Endangered Species' ....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AH . . OKAY . . . JUST ONE MORE QUESTION:

 

 

WHY IS A HORSE MOUNTED FROM IT'S LEFT SIDE ? . . . . ANYONE ? confused.gif

 

 

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And I've always heard about trying to 'catch the BRASS Ring' . . . but have seen it Only in Cartoons, such as in the (1936) 'SomeWhere in Dreamland' . . . beginning @ 6:05.

 

One of my favorite cartoons. That and Owl Jolson/I Love To Singa.

 

ugaarte, on Martha's Vineyard there is a carousel that still has the brass ring. Or it did last time I was there.

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Oh, Willbefree, I Love the 'Owl Jolson/I Love to Singa' cartoon.

 

 

It's one of mine and my brother's favorites. And now my sons love it too.

 

 

Hey, that's great to know that Brass Ring Carousels may still exist.

 

 

Let me ask this . . . Was the Brass Ring the Prize ?

 

 

Or was it like if you got so many of them, you can turn them in for the final prize . . . like @ Chucky Cheese ?

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks much for the info, Willbe . . .

 

 

 

 

 

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I think the brass ring entitled you to a free ride.

 

I have seen at least one movie where children were reaching for a brass ring, but the name of the picture now escapes me.

 

As for why horses are mounted from its left side:

 

Tradition.

 

No, really, here's something:

 

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2123/why-are-horses-traditionally-mounted-from-the-left-side

 

The information sounds authoritative, but I can't vouch for it.

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TikiSoo, I like the way carousel horses' faces look. I think all inanimate objects that resemble living things, be it the above-named horses, manniquins, statues, or porcelain dolls ( or puppets !), capture the imagination of writers and filmmakers because there's something mysterious about them. They look almost alive, but they're not.

This has a lot of potential for imaginative people to create stories around them, what would happen if by some strange magic force they came to life?

And - maybe because they're not human - these mysteriously animated beings are usually imagined by writers to be malevolent.

 

You have to admit, carousel horses are beautiful the way they are, strange grins or not.

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I'm so glad there's a thread where I can be a "know-it-all". ;-)

 

I've been told the reason for mounting a horse from one side had to do with swords too.

 

It's tough to say when talking about "history" because all it takes is one person's musings and another repeating them to become "fact". I remember in my museum days someone asking why a carousel horse was carved with it's tongue sticking out. A fellow curator said glibly, "Maybe he didn't like the guy he was working for" and I actually seen that crazy statement repeated in books as "fact"!

It's taught me the plethora of opinion & speculation in historical "facts". Unless you were there, it's ALL speculation or pov. (ever read Capra's autobiography?)History is all educated guessing.

 

I believe there are a few carousels in the US that still employ the brass ring machines. Off the top of my head I think Providence RI, Riverfront Park, Spokane WA (plastic rings!) and Knoebels Groves PA have them as well as Martha's Vinyard.

I find steel rings in horses all the time, but it was the brass one that got you a free ride.

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