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ginnyfan

About the Rutherford tribute

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It was nice to see RO introducing the films and calling Ann a great friend to TCM and all, but couldn't the programmers have done a better job of getting Ann Rutherford movies that actually had a lot of Ann Rutherford in them.

 

I admit that I was only in the house for two of them. One, WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, has Ann out of town for at least the first half hour. I DVRed it and I'm still waiting for her to show up again since her one early scene. Maybe she does something tremendous in the second half of the film to make it a worthy tribute film, but I'm just not seeing it.

 

The other one, THIS TIME FOR KEEPS, I definitely had to see since it's part of what I've proclaimed to be TCM's SOG. And the film really fits under that designation.

 

Ann has top billing, but the film is really about two things-Robert Sterling's relationship with father-in-law Guy Kibbee and how many capers Virginia Weidler could pull off in 73 minutes.

 

OK, so I'm happy because I watched it for Weidler anyway. But it's supposed to be a starring vehicle for Ann and she's really no factor. This would be a good film if TCM actually did a Weidler tribute.

 

Regardless of how one felt about the bumping of Sanders today, one must admit that there were some other films which might have shown Ann Rutherford's talents a little more than these.

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Yup.

 

I said the same and more in the Rutherford obit thread.

 

Ann has top billing, but the film is really about two things-Robert Sterling's relationship with father-in-law Guy Kibbee and how many capers Virginia Weidler could pull off in 73 minutes.

 

I could barely keep up with the convolution of this movie. Glad it wasn't just me.

 

The one with Conway was somewhat better, but neither actor had 'it' that made so many top actors memorable. My question in the other thread and here: why didn't Ann have 'it'? She seemed competent and a decent hard working actor, but she did not have 'it'.

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> {quote:title=willbefree25 wrote:}{quote}Yup.

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> I said the same and more in the Rutherford obit thread.

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> Ann has top billing, but the film is really about two things-Robert Sterling's relationship with father-in-law Guy Kibbee and how many capers Virginia Weidler could pull off in 73 minutes.

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> I could barely keep up with the convolution of this movie. Glad it wasn't just me.

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> The one with Conway was somewhat better, but neither actor had 'it' that made so many top actors memorable. My question in the other thread and here: why didn't Ann have 'it'? She seemed competent and a decent hard working actor, but she did not have 'it'.

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I think Ann could have 'it' but not in the movies I saw today, although I didn't watch them all. Now I actually liked THIS TIME FOR KEEPS because I'm such a big fan of Weidler's clever kid act, but IMDb and others have said that it was MGM's second attempt to start a Hardy-type series starring Rutherford and yet she has only a little more importance to the story than Andy Hardy's sister did in his films. Weidler is more like Andy in the film. It's an odd choice for a tribute as is WASHINGTON MELODRAMA which based on what I've watched already is going to be all Frank Morgan.

 

I think TopBilled had it right in the other thread. They should have waited to plan a tribute that would showcase Ann and not just have her as part of the cast.

 

Her Fox films or a bunch of Hardy's where her screen time might still be limited but she had impact on the films would have worked better than the two I saw today.

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I have a question about the Ann Rutherford tribute. I saw some of the films during the daytime and Robert Osborne's generic intro (not anything specific about the movie about to be shown) about her life and death.

 

I was unable to see the Gone with the Wind airing at 8 p.m., which was already scheduled for SOTM Leslie Howard. Did Robert Osborne have anything specific to say about Ann Rutherford's passing during the intro for that film, or was the intro made before she died?

 

Robbie

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He made a brief mention before the showing of Two O'Clock Courage, which I barely heard because of his airbrushed face. But he said she did really nicely in her supporting part and that the movie was part of a month long tribute to Leslie Howard.

 

That's about it, I believe.

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> {quote:title=Sprocket_Man wrote:}{quote}And what about a tribute to Ernest Rutherford, who first charted the structure of the atom?

 

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure that he mainly worked in Paramount Bs and Universal won't release them.

 

On the other hand, TCM has several films of Johnny Rutherford, former Indy champ.

 

Rutherford B. Hayes, sadly, made no films.

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Earlier this week, on another thread, I said I felt that TCM should've waited on this tribute, so they could put more thought into it and get some of her films made at Fox. She shines in prominent roles in BERMUDA MYSTERY, ORCHESTRA WIVES and HAPPY LAND.

 

I did record WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, which I rather liked (I regard it as a Frank Morgan vehicle, and it has a showy role for young Dan Dailey...they're the stars of it); and I recorded TWO O'CLOCK COURAGE. On the outside of the DVD sleeve, I wrote B Films with Ann Rutherford. That's what this tribute was.

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>He made a brief mention before the showing of Two O'Clock Courage, which I barely heard because of his airbrushed face. But he said she did really nicely in her supporting part and that the movie was part of a month long tribute to Leslie Howard.

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>That's about it, I believe.

 

That was in the "generic intro" I already mentioned that aired periodically during the day. I was asking if Robert Osborne mentioned anything about her passing during the intro and outro for the 8 p.m. airing of Gone with the Wind, which was already scheduled for SOTM Leslie Howard. Or were the intro and outro shot for that before she died?

 

Thanks,

 

Robbie

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I recorded it last night but have not viewed it yet. My guess is that they did not change the intro to GWTW, since all the Leslie Howard wraparounds would have been filmed in advance.

 

And for those that did not watch all or any of the Rutherford tribute, Mr. Osborne did not introduce all the films. For example, there was no Osborne intro for THIS TIME FOR KEEPS. And the films he did introduce did not have "outros" after the movie finished playing. It was rather sparse.

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There really is no need to rush these tributes. As I said, they waited over two months to schedule a day of Gloria Stuart films in her honor. And if I remember correctly, Anne Francis died last year in January, and nothing was done until August when they gave her a SUTS tribute. I don't think anyone was that upset about it. Folks knew that eventually TCM would get around to it, which they did.

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> I don't think anyone was that upset about it. Folks knew that eventually TCM would get around to it, which they did.

 

That's not, unfortunately, the case all the time. Honoring a star who has recently passed away usually is the cause for much turmoil on these boards as posters debate (sometimes argue) over how quickly a tribute can and should be done. Some believe that it should be as quickly as possible, some believe that it shouldn't be ruled by how quickly but should take longer so as to get a wider range of films (though none of us knows how long a studio like Fox, Sony or Universal could hold up that process with negotiations) and there are some who don't like having the schedule disrupted to honor a deceased star.

 

No matter how TCM handles the situation there will be vocal opponents here who aren't happy with the staff's decisions or their choices.

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>No matter how TCM handles the situation there will be vocal opponents here who aren't happy with the staff's decisions or their choices.

 

Right. They will never please everyone, no matter how hard they try. For the most part, they do an adequate job with the timeliness of the tributes, and in terms of disruptions to the schedule, three or four titles at the most have been displaced (and usually those return to the schedule in the months ahead).

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I agree that TCM handles tributes to recently deceased performers very well. It's difficult to change programming on the spur of the moment without mobilizing a lot of people out of their normal routines into making these changes.

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Ginnyfan wrote:

 

 

It was nice to see RO introducing the films and calling Ann a great friend to TCM and all, but couldn't the programmers have done a better job of getting Ann Rutherford movies that actually had a lot of Ann Rutherford in them.

 

I admit that I was only in the house for two of them. One, WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, has Ann out of town for at least the first half hour. I DVRed it and I'm still waiting for her to show up again since her one early scene. Maybe she does something tremendous in the second half of the film to make it a worthy tribute film, but I'm just not seeing it.

 

The other one, THIS TIME FOR KEEPS, I definitely had to see since it's part of what I've proclaimed to be TCM's SOG. And the film really fits under that designation.

 

Ann has top billing, but the film is really about two things-Robert Sterling's relationship with father-in-law Guy Kibbee and how many capers Virginia Weidler could pull off in 73 minutes.

 

OK, so I'm happy because I watched it for Weidler anyway. But it's supposed to be a starring vehicle for Ann and she's really no factor. This would be a good film if TCM actually did a Weidler tribute.

 

Regardless of how one felt about the bumping of Sanders today, one must admit that there were some other films which might have shown Ann Rutherford's talents a little more than these.

 

 

 

 

 

Topbilled wrote:

 

 

I did record WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, which I rather liked (I regard it as a Frank Morgan vehicle, and it has a showy role for young Dan Dailey...they're the stars of it); and I recorded TWO O'CLOCK COURAGE. On the outside of the DVD sleeve, I wrote B Films with Ann Rutherford. That's what this tribute was.

 

 

 

 

 

GF & TB:

 

 

I recorded th titles WASHINGTON MELODRAMA and THIS TIME FOR KEEPS, but didn't get a chance to see them until this weekend. First of all, one needs to understand that Ann Rutherford was popular, but not officially ranked as a "star" by her studio; she was a featured player. This meant that she was usually cast in supporting or "featured" roles in big-budget A movies, and given leading lady roles in programmers and b-movies; which is what these tw movies were, respectvely. One of the studios' purposes in the more economy-minded features was to provide roles for as many of their featured-player contractees as possible, especially when a proposed series was contemplated-and many if not most, of a given studio's programmers and b-films were considered thus. They were also good testing grounds for new talent in fairly unrisky situations, whether in a bit like Ava Gardner's in TTFK, or in more substantial role, such as Dan Dailey (jr.)'s, in WM.

 

 

 

 

 

So several featured players from the extensive MGM stock company got roles of varying importance in thsse two movies. In WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, we have Kent Taylor, Virginia Grey, Lee Bowman, and of course Ann and the aforementioned Dailey. Plus Frank Morgan, a character actor, but an important name, and a star of programmers at the studio, along with recent successes in the more prestigious THE WIZARD OF OZ and THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER. So it was natural that he got top billing in the film. I had seen some of the film the evening of the tribute, and was dubious about the statement that Dailey one of the two stars of this (along with Morgan). So I timed each of the main performers' time on screen. In terms of screentime, Ann actually had the most, even with her absence formost of the first half hour, edging out Morgan. This was followed by the actual male lead, Kent Taylor, and then the villain, Dailey, who was also allowed his forte, a dance routine. Ann did get a showcase role, for it allowed her to show her versatility, with a decent French accent, as well as look glamorous in several scenes. All in all, a movie that accomplish all that its (modest) aspirations set out to do.

 

 

 

 

 

Likewise THIS TIME FOR KEEPS. It also featured many of the studio's young hopefuls; besides Ann, there were Robert Sterling and Virginia Weidler, among others. Plus name character actors like Guy Kibbee and Irene Rich. in terms of actual screen time, Sterling actually go the most, followed by Ann, who edged out Weidler. and Kibbee a more distant fourth. Again Ann was absent for a good portion at the beginning, but this abence is what sets the plot in motion. If anything, this film was a showcase for Sterling and the rambunctious Weidler. But another modest entry that hit the marks it had to.

 

 

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Thanks, Arturo. I can picture you with a stop-watch, timing the performers...!

 

When I said Dan Dailey was a star in WASHINGTON MELODRAMA, I did not mean to suggest he had the most screen time. Instead, I felt it was a good opportunity for him to show off his talent and we can see that he had plenty of opportunity to continue establishing his inimitable style, and what became his trademark screen persona, in this early role.

 

I agree that Rutherford is featured more in the film's second half, trying to help her pop (Frank Morgan) out of a sticky situation.

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