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what was the first old movie you ever seen


TCMfan23

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sorry to confuse you all.

 

I really meant this : what was the first 'studio era' movie you seen ? meaning movies from the 1910's through the 60's.

 

For people born in the late 80's , those are considered old.

 

 

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Clore, we're about the same age. How well I remember Claude Kirchner, the Terrytoon Circus, and Clownie (or was it Clowny?). I loved Modern Farmer, as an NYC boy I thought it so romantic, all those countrypeople working in the fields. Modern Farmer was on in the very early morning hours in NYC -- maybe 6am or something like that. I'd like to see those films again, are they available?

 

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Considering the 70's ended 32 years ago, I'd say those films made during that decade are "old." However, I don't want to steer this discussion in that direction, just emphasizing the obvious.

 

Edited by: helenbaby on Jul 23, 2012 4:07 PM

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> {quote:title=helenbaby wrote:}{quote}Considering the 70's ended 32 years ago, I'd say those films made during that decade are "old." However, I don't want to steer this discussion in that direction, just emphasizing the obvious.

Why not? Simply because some people here don't consider the 70's "appropriate" for TCM?

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> {quote:title=Swithin wrote:}{quote}Clore, we're about the same age. How well I remember Claude Kirchner, the Terrytoon Circus, and Clownie (or was it Clowny?). I loved Modern Farmer, as an NYC boy I thought it so romantic, all those countrypeople working in the fields. Modern Farmer was on in the very early morning hours in NYC -- maybe 6am or something like that. I'd like to see those films again, are they available?

"And now it's time for most of you to go to bed."

 

Usually sis and I went to bed when Claude Kirschner said that - we may not have gone to sleep right away, but we went to bed. :)

 

I haven't found a trace of THE MODERN FARMER since those days when it came on right after "The Star Spangled Banner." We didn't care, heck we used to watch the dot that remained on screen when we turned the set off.

 

Another early morning favorite was "Learn To Draw With Jon Gnagy" - at least for my sister. I have a strong visual sense, I just can't get it down on paper. My skill is as a photographer.

 

Sis had considerable talent when it came to drawing faces or horses, but not so much when it came to landscapes and such. She so wanted one of those Jon Gnagy kits, but it was too expensive to buy one from what may have been our first viewing of an infomercial.

 

 

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I remember Gnagy! Haven't thought about that show in years! The morning kids show that we watched was Ding Dong School, with Miss Francis. Never quite got into Romper Room. And of course Howdy Doody, at 5 pm.

 

But the movies -- Million Dollar Movie, The Late Show, The Late Late Show, and (I think) The Late, Late, Late Show, and Shock Theater for horror films, on after the Ben Hecht Show.

 

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I haven't thought of old Claude in a while. I remember watching him, though I

didn't remember the name of the show. I do definitely remember Clownie. Maybe

I've got it wrong, but I recall him as one sarcastic, mean s.o.b., at least in the

context of a kids' show. My favorite meal at the time was a peanut butter and

honey sandwich which I'd eat getting ready for Claude and Clownie. And shortly

after that it was bedtime. Weird going to bed while it was still light outside.

 

Later on there was Officer Joe Bolton showing the Three Stooges and his Now

remember, don't try this at home spiel. MDM was definitely for those who were

obsessed with seeing a movie over and over again.

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The first movie I remember watching was at a drvie-in, when I was about 3 years old. It was a Mexican movie about the legend of La Llorona; I don't Know what it was called but it could've been LA LLORONA. I remember it scared the be-jesus out of me, and I tried to hide under the car seat. My parents explained that La Llorona comes after little children and drowns them, so I better be good and obey. I guess that is why La Llorona is still effective to scare kids to this day.

 

 

 

At one of the downtown movie theaters in Tijuana, before I was 4 years or so, I remember seeing PINOCHO, THE PARTY and THE AMAZING VAMPIRE KILLERS. All except the Disney one were fairly recent releases, so I don't know if they count.

 

 

 

On TV, once we lived in Los Angeles, I remember the Million Dollar Movie, the Fabulous 52, The Late Show, Ben Hunter's Matinee, etc. The earliest movies I remember were those that were repeated all week; I've mentioned here before that my dad (who had played on a Mexican minor league baseball team) loved DAMN YANKEES (or maybe Gwen Verdon); we would see this one every night while on (Ray Walston's devil terrified me). Also remember seeing all week THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON and some dinosaur movie (THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT?). We also watched episodes of the 3 Stooges and Our Gang/Little Rascals (although they seemed to have been syndicated under the name of THE MISCHIEF MAKERS. We watched all types of movies from the 30s-50s, from Westerns, Gangsters, Comedies, War movies, etc. Later, also the Universal horror movies on Creature Feature, Chiller, Seymour Presents, etc.

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My earliest memories are fuzzy so I can only say what group of old classics I remembered. Around 1961 when I was 6, channel 13 had the old Saturday night *Chiller* presentation at 11:30pm and they showed the old Universal horror classics i.e. "Frankenstein", "The Wolfman" and "Dracula". I vaguely remember "Godzilla" (1953), I think?? The oldest TV shows are like a snapshot - cannot remember any details but "Hawaiian Eye" and "Mr Lucky" are the earliest.

 

One thing that really stood out was this horrific creature that scared the living daylights out of me, I've mentioned it once here but no one has a clue what it was I saw. What I remember was a night time foggy eerie type of forest setting (like in the "Wolfman") and the narrator had a very low, calm voice speaking and this thing walked from left to right on the screen. It was like a gorilla - big bulky body and used its arms to aid in walking (like a gorilla) but it had the most scary *very large* eyes like a *tarsier.* (photo below)

 

One of my biggest unsolved movie mystereis. I like to find resolution. I'm suspecting its a foreign made horror film, long since forgotten. There is NOT a modern horror film that scared me like that one! :(

 

*BOO*

tarsier_nocturnal_animals.jpg

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Bilgewasser and Swithin:

 

Do either of you remember when Channel 13 was WNTA? They were owned by National Telefilm Associates and much of the schedule was 20th-Fox movies that were in the NTA catalog. I remember seeing HOUSE OF STRANGERS and CRY OF THE CITY as a youngster on their Friday late movie.

 

They also aired the syndicated series based on HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE.

 

Or how about Allen Swift as the host of the daily POPEYE show on WPIX? He would come on a mock ship and say "Four bells, Six O'clock, Captain Allen Swift on deck to greetcha." He left for more lucrative voiceover work, one of them being doing most of the voices on DIVER DAN.

 

Or Gloria Okon doing the weather t the end of the show for Arnold Brick Oven Bread?

 

Here's something you guys may enjoy, it's from the late 80s with Stewart Klein interviewing former WNEW (I remember when it was WABD) kid show hosts Sandy Becker, Soupy Sales and Uncle Fred Scott:

 

 

It's in three parts, the links follow at the finish of the chapters.

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I missed that one, if I saw that at 6, I probually went into mental shutdown! TV outdid themselves there. Lizzie is uglier than the crab faced Predator when it first primiered. Matter of fact *network* television *did not* show the face of Predator when it first aired on Fox 11.

 

I hope some poor pre schooler didn't see Lizzie. Say goodbye to a parent's restful nights sleep!

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*Do you mean THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS, the comedy by Roman Polanski?*

Yes that's the one.

*That Mexican movie was called THE CRYING WOMAN.*

Not where I saw it...must've been LA LLORONA, which translate into the title you listed.
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> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote}

>

> *That Mexican movie was called THE CRYING WOMAN.*

>

> Not where I saw it...must've been LA LLORONA, which translate into the title you listed.

Uh, well...yeah. Of course. There's been several movies made around that legend over the years, but the 1960 movie is the most well-known version.

 

"It was a Mexican movie about the legend of La Llorona; I don't Know what it was called but it could've been LA LLORONA."

 

That's what you said...I was merely replying to it.

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Clore, I was thinking of the pre-PBS 13 recently, because 13 is celebrating 50 years as PBS. The old 13 had a great horror film series called "Shock-o-Rama." Mostly odd and lower budget stuff, like The Creeper, which I yearn to see again.

 

I remember Captain Allen Swift, Gloria Okon, etc. Also Officer Joe Bolton (Channel 9, I think). I'm going to watch those Stewart Klein clips now. I barely remember when WNEW was Dumont, was that WABD?

 

 

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I recall what PBS used to be like as far as classic films go, and I'm talking about way back in the 70's. In Cleveland, we had a program I always watched with film historian Stu Levin called "Old Movies: The Golden Era". He always presented a mix of 30's and 40's classics, along with a great selection of silent films...all introduced in the manner that we've come to know from RO here on TCM. That's what got me into silent classics...that program back in Cleveland. This is when I was a young teen, incidentally...and I loved what I watched, even silents like INTOLERANCE and ORPHANS OF THE STORM.

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Yes, WABD was Dumont. I think that it was in 1958 that the call letters changed, I do recall that it was right around the time that school started.

 

I barely remember "Shock-O-Rama" as the films that they showed didn't have the Karloff, Lugosi, Chaney names that I was already associating with horror films, even as I was just becoming exposed to them. I never got to stay up late for the Zacherley shows on WABC, but usually one or two titles were rerun on the weekend without the host.

 

 

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My memory of much of this stuff is fuzzy, and I only remember 13 as WNET,

the public TV station. Some of the shows you mentioned I don't think I watched.

I do remember Soupy Sales scrambling up the ladder to put the name of the

show on the theater marquee, but I don't remember much of the show itself.

 

I do recall that just about every Saturday night I watched Zacherly, I believe on

WPIX. That was must see TV for me and most of my friends. I was surprised

when he later became a DJ on WNEW-FM. Now that was spooky.

 

I remember many years later when Bobby Fisher won the chess championship

and 13 had a giant paper chess board and the "host" would move the pieces manually

as they came in. Talk about low tech, but I guess that was the best they could do.

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> {quote:title=Bilgewasser wrote:}{quote}

> I remember many years later when Bobby Fisher won the chess championship

> and 13 had a giant paper chess board and the "host" would move the pieces manually as they came in. Talk about low tech, but I guess that was the best they could do.

I was thinking of that earlier today as it was 40 years ago, right around this time of year. I was still dating the woman who became my wife (and then my ex). Her father was a chess buff but had to work and thus could not watch the match. He had his wife monitor them and log each move on a sheet of paper - talk about low tech.

 

If he could have in those days, he would have recorded and watched them.

 

He bought one of those early computerized chess "toys" - it wasn't a computer program. He had it for a few weeks but always lost. I'm no buff, but somehow I managed to beat the thing on my first try and wow, was he upset. I thought he was going to throw the thing across the room and as far as I know, he never used it again.

 

I guess that's where his daughter's temper originated. ;)

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For me it is hard to remember exactly which old film came first but my vivid recollections are:

 

Wathcing Laurel and Hardy in "March of the Wooden Soldiers" ( aka Babes in Toyland )

My dad loved sharing with me the movies he enjoyed when he was young. First viewing for this one was around 1973 0r 1974 when I was 5 years old. WPIX/channel 11 in New YOrk usually showed this one around Christmas time and one afternoon when my mom was out Christmas shopping I watched it with my dad. One of my favorite childhood memories. My dad is completely responsible for turning me onto all the classics.

 

Also around this time I know I watched classic b&w horror movies on WPIX during "Chiller Theatre" on Saturdays and on PBS/Channel 13 New York City ( as was stated previously ). PBS is where I remember seeing "Dracula" for the first time, the whole way through. I was pretty young at the time as well and Lugosi really creeped me out. It is such an endearing memory. Also on WPIX they showed Abbott and Costello movies every Sunday morning at 11:30 am. My favorite was/is "A&B meet Frankenstein. WPIX was such an awesome channel in the 70's and 80's.

 

 

 

 

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Probably not the best way to endear yourself to your future father-in-

law. Some chess players can really go ballistic when they lose--to

another person or to a machine.

 

I remember I had a Satuday night ritual. I'd take a shower and then

get ready to watch Chiller Theater, and then a little while later it was

bedtime.

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