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has anyone sat through Godfather 1 and 2 non stop?


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> {quote:title=kriegerg69 wrote:}{quote}I actually have enjoyed Godfather 3. It's decidedly different than the first two, but still enjoyable.

I actually really enjoy 3 as well. Many feel it is not on a par with the first two, and arguably it is not, but I still feel it is a worthy conclusion to the trilogy. It is the only Godfather film I ever saw in theatres and it looked amazing. No one involved should be ashamed of their work in this film, except perhaps for Sofia Coppola. I don't think she is quite as horrible as many feel and does not deserve some of the awful things that have been said about her. But really she has no business in this movie ... thank you Papa Coppola LOL

 

 

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Right, I'm not sure Godfather lll deserves all the trashing and thrashing it got. Not up to the level of the first two, but not the deplorable rubbish many critics proclaimed it was, either.

 

About Sofia Coppola: True, she's not much of an actress. But she turned out to be her father's daughter in terms of another talent. She's quite a good director. Not as prolific or iconoclastic as her dad, perhaps, but not bad. *Lost in Translation*, at any rate, is a fine little movie.

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}My first thought is how anyone can sit through anything non-stop for 5 or 6 hours without a comfort break.

Didn't we have a thread a few weeks ago about portable toilets? ( A thread that you started, I believe.)

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}You mean somebody is supposed to be watching both movies while sitting on a portable toilet?

Some movies make you feel as though you need to be sitting on one. :^0

 

Not the Godfather films, though.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> About Sofia Coppola: True, she's not much of an actress. But she turned out to be her father's daughter in terms of another talent. She's quite a good director. Not as prolific or iconoclastic as her dad, perhaps, but not bad. *Lost in Translation*, at any rate, is a fine little movie.

I haven't seen that one yet. Been wanting to because of Bill Murray's nomination he got for it.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}I love the Godfather movies. I even kind of like the much-reviled third one.

>

>

> Shameless bump, because I think the Godfather movies are worth discussing.

>

I agree...and I'm pretty sure I've read over the years a few times where others have said they consider II to be even better than the first one.

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Two of my favorite movies of all time, The Godfather I and II. I actually haven't ever watched them consecutively. I'm not sure I could take it. Each of them is so powerful an emotional experience. I saw each of them as a teenager back in the 70's when they first came out. I was blown away then and continue to be. On a side note, I did watch that "Saga" televison version when it was first aired and I have to admit I was disappointed. Something was lost when the movies were shown in "chronological" order instead of the original form. For me, much of the sheer emotional impact of Part II is the cross-cutting between generations. I agree with Miss Wonderly about that great final scene in Part I. I would like to add a couple of scenes from Part II that I think are as amazing. First, the scene of the ship approaching Ellis Island with all of the soon to be new Americans standing and staring in awe at the Statue of Liberty. Also, the scene of the young Vito singing in his quarantined cell. Slowly there is a fade out to young Anthony Corleone (Vito's grandson) making his First Communion. (and a perfect example of something that was lost in the TV version).

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I've sure the Godfather movies have discussed in these forums before, but I think it's the first time for me that I've seen a thread about them. So here goes:

 

By coincidence, not really on account of the question posed in this thread, I watched the first two Godfather films recently. But not "non-stop". I watched Part 1 on Thursday, and Part 2 last night.

 

There really is a lot to say about these movies. It was interesting for me because earlier yesterday I'd seen a live performance of Shakepeare's Henry V, and although obviously it's very different from Coppola's films, there are some thematic similarities that really struck me. They're both about a leader, a powerful person, and how or even whether he balances his desire for more power with his obligations to his people.

 

More than anything, the Godfather movies are about power, acquiring it and maintaining it, and the things a person is willing to do to achieve those goals. It's about how someone can justify to themselves the evil things they do, how they can convince themselves that they are not "bad", they are "strong". They can use very sophisticated arguments for this purpose, usually to convince themselves as much as others.

The lead characters' rationalizing of their terrible actions, the way they can attend mass, talk about their families and children, and speak of friendship and trust, while at the same time ordering the murders of people they've just shaken hands with, had never been so clearly depicted in a gangster movie, or any type of movie for that matter, until The Godfather films.

 

A few people have mentioned the fact that that you can watch the earlier story, the one about Vito Corleone when he was young, and his rise to power, in sequence, chronologically, without the inter-editing of the 1950s Michael Corleone part. But I prefer the two stories interwoven as they are; for one thing, it highlights the difference between Vito Corleone and his son, how the former always values friendship and family, how he becomes almost a hero to the working Italian community he helps, and how the latter's first and foremost purpose is always consolidating and expanding his power; considerations of family and friendship come second, if at all.

 

But what makes the character of Michael Corleone fascinating is his intelligence, his self-control, and his utter ruthlessness, combined with his self-deception in his belief that he is doing his best for his family, and that he is , despite the many deadly decisions he makes, a good person.

 

These matters are addressed in the third Godfather film - but I've yet to re-watch that one.

 

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part 3 is a piece of crap when compared to 1 and 2. I always avoid watching it when it comes on TV. But the last time it was on , I tried watching it. I couldn't. I kept getting the urge to grab the remote control. After like 20 minutes through , the turned it off. I couldn't take it.

 

Copplola shoulda stopped the story in 1959 when Fredo is killed.

 

 

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Since most (though not all) American mobsters were of Italian descent and

since most Italians are Catholic, it's not surprising that they did their duty as

Catholics. That would add another thematic possibility to the Mafia as typical
businessmen trope, one that is probably best left alone here. They also played

up the family values schtick while having their mistresses on the side.

As spectacular and well-done as the Godfather movies are, when you come

right down to it, Vito and Michael are just murderous scumbags, maybe interest-

ing, well-dressed ones, but scumbags none the less. I like to imagine Michael

getting the same treatment as the Joe Pesci character in Goodfellas, though that

obviously ain't going to happen.
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That's why it's just a project in my imagination. Michael would of course

outsource the job (maybe even to someone outside the U.S.), and have a

solid alibi ready. AMC ran all three Godfathers movies a while back. I was

tempted to watch the third one, since I haven't seen it since it first came out.

Maybe it would be better than I remember it, and I've also forgotten much of the

plot details too. But it started very late at night and AMC has a whole lot of

commercials. Maybe some other time.

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For me, MissW, that theme was brought into perspective in GF1, the scene where Michael tells Kate his father is no different than any other powerful man, "...like a president or senator". When Kate replies, "Do you know how naive you sound? Presidents and senators don't have men killed" Michael sadly replies, "Oh, Kate. Who sounds naive?".

 

 

ALWAYS one of my favorite scenes!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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